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Not 'Springfield Armory' - it's the Ordnance 'wheel' found on the M1911A1s as an acceptance stamp.
Correct, and to put a little finer point on it...the formal name is the Ordnance Escutcheon. It consists of a cannoneers belt around crossed cannons. It was applied to lots of U.S. martial arms, not just M1911A1 pistols. The "flaming bomb," aka "shell and flame" is known formally as the Ordnance Insignia and was also used on quite a few U.S. martial arms. The commercial company known as Springfield Armory appropriated the escutcheon as their logo.
 

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Could this be as advertised and depicted?

A 1946 prewar/postwar Super,...with some (depicted) added stamps. ?

Did the 1946 prewar/postwar Supers have Swartz Safety parts installed,...what main spring housings did they have?

Did the 1945 Supers have Swartz Safety parts installed,...what main spring housings did they have?

How would this letter?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sold today for $14,000 + 18%. (Not to me.)

I found that other examples sold at auction in the low $20Ks.

Personally, I find the collecting interest in this model a bit extreme. Internet research indicates that some 400 were delivered in 1945 to the government. So, they clearly didn't really get any OSS use during the war. Apparently not many have shown up, so they are rare. But the residue of that 400 is probably just sitting there in some crates in that giant government warehouse, right next to the Arc of the Covenant.

Thanks to the experts here for enlightening me on what was going on here. I was very curious.
 

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One of 400 on an OSS contract. That gun is still way under the money. Very few of these are known.

There are some red flags on this gun. As always, due diligence is warranted.
I have been told that no guns were shipped in a block after 1943, was this a block of guns in a serial range?
 

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Sold today for $14,000 + 18%. (Not to me.)

I found that other examples sold at auction in the low $20Ks.

Personally, I find the collecting interest in this model a bit extreme. Internet research indicates that some 400 were delivered in 1945 to the government. So, they clearly didn't really get any OSS use during the war. Apparently not many have shown up, so they are rare. But the residue of that 400 is probably just sitting there in some crates in that giant government warehouse, right next to the Arc of the Covenant.

Thanks to the experts here for enlightening me on what was going on here. I was very curious.
Whether the OSS ever used them isn't even a consideration as to their market value, and in fact the better the condition the higher the price. Just like some of the Colt Pocket Hammerless, the fact they were OSS shipped is all the pedigree they need. Maybe most still exist, or maybe most were reduced to scrap metal during the huge weapons destruction of the Clinton years. The market still finds them highly desirable.
 

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This pertains to the OPs auction link in post #1, for Super .38 serial number 36883.

That auction description,..."38 CAL PISTOL, MFG 1946, B41-P16" and it includes 15 pictures. Also, the "Terms Of Sale" are posted and are quite lengthy. (Basically, AS-IS.) NOTE: "MFG 1946" !

Sheldon does a Very Good Job covering COLT'S SUPER .38, from 1929 through 1971. His Chapter 15, (pages 115 - 128), covers the "1946" (and others) Pistols (note the table on page 127).

(Chapter 14, covers United States Government Military Purchases in 1945.)

On page 10, Sheldon has the Serial Number range for 1945-46 Pistols as 32000 - 37835. (New postwar production starts at 40001 in 1947.)

On page 115, paragraph 9, Sheldon has,..."Shortly before the war ended, Colt's had in inventory 1,948 Super .38 receivers,.... 400 of these were used for the government purchase shipped in June and July of 1945. Assembly began on the remaining 1,548 in late August of 1946...."

Table 15-1, on page 127, lists the summary of the shipments of the 1,548 Prewar Serial Numbers that were shipped POSTWAR. So, All of those 1,948 SUPER receivers are (mixed) in the range 32000-37835.

Super .38, serial number 36883, is advertised as a 1946 Pistol,...a Prewar/Postwar Super. ? Apparently, pictures 4 and 10, show close-up damage to the receiver. ? Prewar/Postwar Supers are collectible, however, most likely, this one might be a little pricey.?

P.S. Super 36883, the pistol in the auction, could have been assembled in 1941, 1945, or 1946. It has the characteristics of a 1946 assembled Super. (Also, would a 1945 assembled [18 June 1945 or later] military Super have the late Style
Ordnance Escutcheon? What Style Ordnance Escutcheon does the known 1945 Supers have? What Style does 36883 have?)

 

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The OSS ceased operations and was disbanded at the end of September 1945. If the pistol in question was shipped in 1946 it must have been ordered before operations ceased and the order didn't get cancelled or was redirected to another agency.
 

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The OSS ceased operations and was disbanded at the end of September 1945. If the pistol in question was shipped in 1946 it must have been ordered before operations ceased and the order didn't get cancelled or was redirected to another agency.

NEVER, trust a sellers statement of when a gun was shipped unless they have a letter to back them up. There is so much bad information out there on manufacturing and ship dates. According to Pate these pistols were shipped: 24 to Remington Arms Company on June 19, 1945 and 376 to OSS on July 20, 1945.

Sellers and ship dates are a pet peeve of mine especially if the seller doesn't want to provide the serial number. I am tired of seeing most United States Property model Ms and Commandos as being made in 1942 when in actuality very few where.
End of rant.
 

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FAKE It is not of the 400 ! there are wrong parts on it to start the buyer should have had enough since to call Colt and get a expedited letter and would have known in 24 hrs or less 200 $ could have saved him lots of $ !! I have 2 friends who have all 400 serial numbers and it was not on their list and the GHD did not look right and the cross cannons did not look right and I bet it did not have the Swartz Safety installed ,it looks like a prewar -postwar ruined to me and its not the first one I have seen the same guy who faked them ruined some other original prewar -post war supers he also faked some Match .38 supers that were minty original finish guns that he had the Match added to the roll mark like the early Super Matches were marked but he used serial numbers of 38 supers that were to late for just the Match roll mark and to cover his tracks he put white epoxy paint in the roll marks so you could not get the white out of the roll marks no match barrels no polished parts ect and what a shame because the ones I seen were original finish guns and were 99%.By the way this person has shown up in one of the closed FB groups saying a fire took out his last gun shop well that maybe true but he is flashing pictures of guns and other gun related things, most in the group have no idea who and what he is and I have no doubt he will try to make some sort of come back using younger guys who have no idea who he is!
 
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