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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)









Seeking your views on maker and age, please.

The lack of ribbon or square mounting holes suggests they may not be Ropers.

They would fit the wider trigger-guard New Service introduced in 1909 but they are a perfect fit on my 1902 New Service Target. They did not come to me on that gun.

Little imperfections I can see under a strong light suggest to me they are hand checkered and not machined but I'm no expert.

Thanks

Steve
 

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Hi ..so you are the guy who out bid me!!! I really wanted those. Personally I feel they may have been the work of Walter Roper but I cant confirm it. I wanted these to study and compaire to my other ropers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Hi ..so you are the guy who out bid me!!! I really wanted those. Personally I feel they may have been the work of Walter Roper but I cant confirm it. I wanted these to study and compaire to my other ropers.
Hi Skilled.

Sorry about that but I just had to have them!

At the time I had a pretty severe pang of buyer's remorse at how much I paid. I don't wish to "rub salt in the wound" but my doubts evaporated when I got them as they are real quality and a perfect fit. What I ignorantly assumed was a chip in the top of the inside of one of the grips turned out to be a carefully dished relief for the right hand side of the hammer pin.
 

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The dished relief is another reason it screams roper to me. Not many at that time period could make such fantastic stocks. I'm glad forum member got them. Notice the tool marks at the top. I have serveral pairs with these same scratch tool marks. While it could be just because they were hand done we can't deny the possibility that they were in the Roper shop. I am thinking a special order of some kind. I know they have no jig holes but some don't and you can't always go by that. The wood also looks right to be Roper. If so this would be the first set I know of with factory medallions. But with Gagne's talent he could accomplish anything a customer wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
The dished relief is another reason it screams roper to me. Not many at that time period could make such fantastic stocks. I'm glad forum member got them. Notice the tool marks at the top. I have serveral pairs with these same scratch tool marks. While it could be just because they were hand done we can't deny the possibility that they were in the Roper shop. I am thinking a special order of some kind. I know they have no jig holes but some don't and you can't always go by that. The wood also looks right to be Roper. If so this would be the first set I know of with factory medallions. But with Gagne's talent he could accomplish anything a customer wanted.
Skilled, it's generous of you to provide your comments and expert views like this.

You're a true gentleman and I'm feeling slightly bad about out bidding you!

Steve
 

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Hi Steve,
I have this pair I bought from the same seller as yours. I also believe that they are from the same maker as yours. Same distinctive markings and exquisite design and craftsmanship. These are for an Officers Model. Another maker could also be Griffin & Howe.











 

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As a point of interest I will mention that the man who owned these was a highly talented & skilled gunsmith/gun maker. He passed away about a year ago and will be missed. His collection of target guns was very impressive and had several highly collectable pre war Colt target pistols. I would not be at all surprised if he did not make the two sets of stocks that are shown above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Hi Steve,
I have this pair I bought from the same seller as yours. I also believe that they are from the same maker as yours. Same distinctive markings and exquisite design and craftsmanship. These are for an Officers Model. Another maker could also be Griffin & Howe.











Thanks for your post. Those are also wonderful. Whoever made the ones you and I now own was a remarkable craftsman. The same guy I am sure. The label on yours suggests to me that the gentleman from Alaska was not the maker but simply a previous owner. My hunch is still Mathias Gagne made them not only for the reasons that have already been posted but also since each seems entirely unique/custom-made, he's the only person to my knowledge who could produce such quality and the attitude of his employer, Walt Roper, was apparently "whatever the customer wants he shall get" Steve.
 

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Yes, I knew John and we used to talk at length about the Colt pre war double actions. He was very knowledgeable on the target models and had collected them for many years.
I knew John and his wife from my years in Alaska. I did not realize he had died. A real gentleman, a very knowledgeable collector, and a highly skilled craftsman. I don't know if he made those stocks, but he certainly had the skills to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)









Seeking your views on maker and age, please.

The lack of ribbon or square mounting holes suggests they may not be Ropers.

They would fit the wider trigger-guard New Service introduced in 1909 but they are a perfect fit on my 1902 New Service Target. They did not come to me on that gun.

Little imperfections I can see under a strong light suggest to me they are hand checkered and not machined but I'm no expert.

Thanks

Steve
Mystery solved!

Mike Poulin has kindly confirmed that these are his work on a special commission some years ago using pre war Colt medallions and stock blank. Mike only does FDL stocks for the 32/380 and 25 pocket pistols now. His site is at Ivory Grips for all Colt Automatics

I'm not sure if I'm glad or sad that mine will remain unique.
 
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