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I bought it through an online auction its my first colt so I figured what the heck. How much do you think its worth? Its just called a trooper?
 

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Yes, this is the first model Trooper, so it's just called Trooper. They chambered it in .357 later on, and if my memory serves me right they renamed it "Trooper 357" and later on just "357". It's an E-frame gun (or it might have been called "medium frame" back then), same action that was later used in the Python. The only technical difference between the Python and the Trooper is that the Trooper has the firing pin on the hammer, whereas the firing pin in the Python (and the 357) is in the frame.
 

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Heck I would have purchased it. $450.00 is a great price, and it is probably a heck of a shooter. Enjoy. Here is a later version in .357

Colt Trooper .357 1962.jpg
 

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I cant tell by your pictures if its been refinished or not but even if it is its worth the money. I have several. Those grips alone are highly sought.
 

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The stocks alone are worth about $450, give or take. So many full-checkered sets with silver medallions have been "upgraded" to gold medallions that silver medallion stocks are worth nearly as much as gold medallion stocks.
 

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Here's a good website for information on Colt Revolvers. The link is for the Trooper Model:

Trooper
 

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Yes, this is the first model Trooper, so it's just called Trooper. They chambered it in .357 later on, and if my memory serves me right they renamed it "Trooper 357" and later on just "357". It's an E-frame gun (or it might have been called "medium frame" back then), same action that was later used in the Python. The only technical difference between the Python and the Trooper is that the Trooper has the firing pin on the hammer, whereas the firing pin in the Python (and the 357) is in the frame.
Actually, the Model 357 preceeded the Trooper series starting in 1953. After the Trooper and Python came out, the 357 Model was discontinued. You are correct in that the 357, Trooper and Python all use the same frame dimensions. Early on, this size frame was known as the .41 caliber frame. The first in this size and action type was the Army Special (1908-1927) later changed to the Official Police (1927-1969). There were about 15,000 total 357 Models produced in 4" and 6" barrel lengths.
 

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Actually, the Model 357 preceeded the Trooper series starting in 1953. After the Trooper and Python came out, the 357 Model was discontinued. You are correct in that the 357, Trooper and Python all use the same frame dimensions. Early on, this size frame was known as the .41 caliber frame. The first in this size and action type was the Army Special (1908-1927) later changed to the Official Police (1927-1969). There were about 15,000 total 357 Models produced in 4" and 6" barrel lengths.
While the above is generally correct, it is slightly off on the details. Both the Trooper and "357" were introduced in late 1953 as 1954 models. The Python was introduced in 1955, but the "357" continued until 1961.

Whenever there is a discussion of E/I-frame Colts, I am overcome with an attack of pedantry and feel compelled to try to list all of the E/I-frame Colts. I think they are:

Army Special, Official Police, Officers Model, Camp Perry, Officers Model Target, Commando, Officers Model Special, Border Patrol, Officers Model Match, Marshal, Trooper, “357,” Python. All use the same basic frame size.

The E-frame Colts with a hammer-mounted firing pin are: Army Special, Official Police, Officers Model, Camp Perry, Officers Model Target, Commando, Officers Model Special, Border Patrol, Officers Model Match, Marshal, Trooper.

I-frame Colts with a frame-mounted firing pin are: “357,” Python, Trooper .38, Trooper .357.

All E-frame/I-frame production ended in 1969, except for the Python, which was finally discontinued completely in 2005 after being a limited-production Custom Shop offering for its last years of production.
 

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1954 Trooper (according to your serial number) and I magnified the pictures on my computer and it does not appear to be refinished. At $450 it's a decent buy and you didn't get hosed at all. If mechanics are sound then you have a great shooter. I have 2 '68 Troopers and they are solid reliable and pretty darn accurate revolvers. Offhand I can't remember what a gave for each as they were bought a few years apart but as I recall both were somewhere in that price range.

If you haven't already, spray a recommended cleaner into the works and let it drain til clear. Small price to pay before you feel the need to tear into the innards. Perhaps it's been decently maintained and the action is crisp and smooth, all the better.

In single action both of my Troopers are scary light on the pull. First time I fired mine it actually caught me off guard as I was trying to determine how light the trigger was and had barely put any presssure on the trigger. probably missed the target I was aiming at. LOL . Once you get a feel for the action then work on your groups and you'll fall in love with the accuracy. Good deal for you IMHO.

J.
 

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I bought my first Trooper new for $108s about 1970?? It was a .357 4" with the wide hammer and target grips. I stupidly sold it after carrying it quite a few years on my guard job. I had other .357`s at the time, wish I had kept it. I own two more. A 4" OLD trooper in .22 lr and a 4" nickle in .38 special. From the standpoint of not having the heavier ribbed barrel and enclosed ejector rod housing of the expensive Python, I believe if I was still working I would carry the Trooper over the Python AND I own two Pythons. I have a 2 1/2" and a 4" Python. One of these days I would like to compare the weight between my Trooper and Python both 4"s. I also need to compare them off the bench. I know SUPPOSEDLY, the Python should be more accurate due to the tapered bore. Probably in the real world off hand, not off a Ransom rest, there will be next to no difference.
 

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If you do your job correctly, the Trooper will surely do its...same as with a Python.
 
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