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During my daily GunBroker browsing I found item 881943200. I don't know if I can post links but if you go to GB and search that number the item pulls up automatically.

It's being offered as an Officer's Model Target from 1961. Based on the little I know, that doesn't exist. The OMT was replaced by the Special and that was replaced by the Officer's Model Match. If you look at the right side of the frame, there is the large single retention screw of a post war E frame. The barrel appears to be from an OMT.

Is this a Frankenstein gun?
 

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I'm guessing he has the year wrong...everything about it looks wrong for 1961. It does appear to have Python stocks or some facsimile of Python stocks. If they're true Python stocks they're worth in the $200-$250 area by themselves. The serial number isn't listed so it's difficult determine when it was made. It's possible it's a mixmaster but without the serial number there's no real way of telling.

Elite FIrearms...while I've never been there...it has a good name among MD gunowners in the Baltimore area. It's also a pawn store to the best of my knowledge and the people may not be that familiar with older Colts.
 

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This revolver is a post war Officers Model Target from 1948-49. It has the dual tone finish and all of the post war frame features. The Officers Model Special replaces this model in 1949. Early post war revolvers have a mix of some pre war frame features. The stocks are modern aftermarket replacements. The correct stocks would have been service type, made of plastic "Colt Wood" with a swirled light and dark brown finish.
 

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Also, the sights would be different on an OMS and it appears to have aftermarket stocks. I agree with 22_Matt on the years. There is a fairly heavy drag line on the cylinder, it might need some timing work. Price looks to be probably ok.
 

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Officers Model Target manufactured in 1949 with aftermarket grips made in Taiwan.
 

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Yep. I have a new in the box OMT manufactured in 1949. Colt is famous for rummaging through its parts bins and putting together frankenguns. I also have a 1911 OM frame with the old style numerals and a post 1935 heavy barrel that was oblivious assembled in the late 1930s. It’s 100% original factory finish from post 1935, with a 1911 frame. But it shoots great.
 

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The early post-war standards of finish were not up to the pre-war guns of the 1930's.
The 1930's were the peak quality of Colt and other gun makers, and all standards fell post-war.

The polishing was not up to pre-war standards, and the post-war bluing was changed to modern hot salts bluing, not the pre-war furnace bluing.
This by no means doesn't say a pre-war Officer's Model Target isn't a fine gun.
 

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Shouldn't the cylinder latch be checkered?
If the gun were earlier, it might have a mix of pre-war, post-war parts. Those are generally known as "transition" guns. This gun has all post war parts.
 

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If the gun were earlier, it might have a mix of pre-war, post-war parts. Those are generally known as "transition" guns. This gun has all post war parts.
Thanks for that info. My 1948 OMT in 22lr has the checkered latch. I believe the OMS came out in 1949 which has the smooth latch so I can understand how Colt would transition certain parts.

Same can be said for the cylinder retention screw on the right side of frame. My '48 has the older 2 piece system while this '49 has the single screw.
 
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