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Discussion Starter #1
Gentlemen,
I would like your opinions on the value of this Colt 1851.
It is in the original box. Engraving adorned on each side with two silver dogs applied in relief.
It would have been offered to general Jackson by Samuel Colt..and the son of JACKSON would have offered it to a French general (French letter of 1895)
This does not seem normal to me because General Jackson was LEE's assistant ... and JACKSON never had male children ...
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As they say, buy the gun; not the story. Beautiful gun and grips. I have never seen one with a silver animal attached like that. I can't help you with value, but if authentic, and add in the box and accessories, I would guess several thousand dollars at the least. Some of the experts will probably be along shortly with opinions toward value. Thanks for posting. I enjoyed looking at it.
 

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I wonder what the extra screws are for on the left side of the barrel, one to the left of the wedge and one near the bottom of the barrel lug.
 

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I wonder what the extra screws are for on the left side of the barrel, one to the left of the wedge and one near the bottom of the barrel lug.
There are three extra screws, which I believe are used to secure the silver relief carvings to the revolver barrel.

Jim
 

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I'm not an expert; but after zooming in on these photos, there are two things would concern me.

First the line of demarcation between the barrel assembly and the bottom of the frame. The photo of the left side of the gun shows the line in the side of the frame; however the photo doesn't show the line going completely across the separation between the entire bottom of the frame and the barrel assembly. In the photo of the right side of the gun, the line doesn't appear at all. Maybe it's just the photo, maybe it is just such a perfect fit the it looks like there is no separation line between the frame and the barrel assembly. I don't know.

The other thing is that in the photo, the three normally stamped serial numbers of the gun doesn't appear in the photo. The first should be stamped in the forward-bottom portion of the trigger guard, second on the forward-bottom portion of the frame, and finally the third on the aft-bottom of the barrel assembly just under the barrel lug cutout.

Maybe it's just the photos; however, maybe it is because revolver was such a custom build that it was meant to be like it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm not an expert; but after zooming in on these photos, there are two things would concern me.

First the line of demarcation between the barrel assembly and the bottom of the frame. The photo of the left side of the gun shows the line in the side of the frame; however the photo doesn't show the line going completely across the separation between the entire bottom of the frame and the barrel assembly. In the photo of the right side of the gun, the line doesn't appear at all. Maybe it's just the photo, maybe it is just such a perfect fit the it looks like there is no separation line between the frame and the barrel assembly. I don't know.

The other thing is that in the photo, the three normally stamped serial numbers of the gun doesn't appear in the photo. The first should be stamped in the forward-bottom portion of the trigger guard, second on the forward-bottom portion of the frame, and finally the third on the aft-bottom of the barrel assembly just under the barrel lug cutout.

Maybe it's just the photos; however, maybe it is because revolver was such a custom build that it was meant to be like it is.
you're right, we don't see a serial number.
I will ask the seller to give me pictures
thanks
 

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I have no idea on value or authenticity. I like it but I think I would like it more without the dogs. It does look to me like the silver dogs are not of the same high quality as the engravings on the gun and on the grips.

I am curious about the cylinder, is it smooth without any cylinder scene or engravings of any sort?
 

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Thanks.
I wonder why the cylinder has no marine battle engraving.
Could colt 1851 have been produced without cylinder engravings?
Examples of the ‘51 Navy do exist without the cylinder engraving. It looks like this may be one of them. I like the gun from what I can see.

jpn
 

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The gun has an E stamped at the serial number. That E looks like a correct Colt marking for a Colt factory engraved gun. But if the factory engraved the gun why no engraving at all on the cylinder? That is not normal. Also, The grips fit well but the bottom of the grips do not show age like Ivory from that period. I do not think the case is factory. To many red flags for me
 

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I will attempt an intelligent reply here. First, if the provenance could be verified, it IMHO would be worth on the order of $100,000. So it is nothing but BS. I personally do not think that dog belongs there. It may have been added at a later time. I sure hope all of the dog crap can come off. Much of the engraving must be very faded. I would otherwise expect an order of magnitude more detail. As an engraved pistol, it has seen better times. Because of that dog, I cannot see the engraving behind it. I would consider that an important part of the work to examine. I would think that the cylinder should have the regular roll stamp on it, or be engraved. Could this be a replacement cylinder? For that matter, where is the serial number stamp on the cylinder?

Can you have a picture taken of the engraving on the hammer? How about a closeup of the engraving on the frame below the cylinder where it spells "Colts Patent"? As an added bonus, how about a pic of the three serial numbers together, where the frame meets the trigger guard, and barrel? Apparently he got that one wrong.

At this point, this raises too many yellow flags for me, some of which I have not listed here. Personally, I would pass on it. I still am interested in what some of the experts here have to say.

FWIW

BTW I do not think the seller sells antique firearms for a living. He does not know how to display his wares in photos. So buyer beware. Oh yes, I find that dog really amusing. :)
 

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I believe it is "a real gun" with real period engraving that has had some wear, been cleaned up some and colored gray, and those dogs were added later for some reason. I don't think the grips are old, and I don't see signs that they are ivory. They look like modern thermoplastic in these photos, which are not the best. This is a gun that has a late enough serial number that it should be possible to letter this gun from the Colt historian. If it was factory engraved the letter would verify that.
 

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You are succinct in your observations. The color grey IMO helps to further give it that antique look to it. I am beginning to think it was “touched up” in broad enough ways in order to help fool the potential buyer, not just to fix small areas. The seller may have been fooled themselves. This has “bad news” written all over it.
 
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