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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Cases Getting Stuck In The Extractor: lately this was happening frequently but was due to viscosity of grease I was using (comes in three mixes depending on temperature) and I was using one too thick. Have ordered another that is lighter for colder weather.

BUT: there were occasional times before this, when I was just using oil as a lube, when the case also would lie flat - mostly in the chamber - not stovepiped and sticking up - and the case rim be stuck in the ejector "claw". Had to wiggle the case a bit to free it.

Could that be caused by limp-wristing? Far as I know that usually can be one reason for stovepipes, but in the case of lying flat? Or if mechanical problem, any good idea what it might be?

The gun is a Colt WWI Repro. When I first got it, after a short while there was a problem with the slide remaining open as if the gun was empty; in reality, there would still be one live round in it. Kind of dangerous problem! Colt fixed this. They put in a new extractor; I don't know if that was the fix or another issue they found. Anyway, this was but a few months ago, hard to believe this extractor is also bad.

Any ideas?
 

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Here is a link to the best article on extractor and ejector tuning I have found.

Brazos Custom click on tips and tricks then click on ejection perfection. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
From op

Here is a link to the best article on extractor and ejector tuning I have found.

Brazos Custom click on tips and tricks then click on ejection perfection. Hope this helps.
FROM OP:
Thanks, i'll check that out.

I did a test on it - the live round test - with two variations: you break the gun down, and with just the slide itself with no other parts in it, move a live round under the extractor. Then see how loose or tight the round is held by the extractor when you shake the slide. Many know that part. But the first variation is that it's OK if the bullet sags a bit due to the weight, but instead of shaking it you rotate the slide slowly end over end (like a propeller). The bullet will sag the way gravity pulls it but the rim of the case should be retained in the ejector "claw" and the bullet not fall out. The second variation is to
then to do the same with just a case. The case should be flat against the breech-face and should not move when the slide is rotated end over end.

Anyway, mine passed that test so maybe it was just limp-wristing - before I used the wrong grease that is and there were many FTEs caused by that.

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I read the article you posted. Sounds great but having 0 mechanical ability, I'd like screw up all those tweaks but good.

That one extractor with the springs sounded interesting.
 

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I adjust my extractors about the same as you, except I keep it simple. With a empty casing i shake the slide and if it does not fall out it is fine. (It can move around). With a live round it should fall out with a shake of the slide.

Also, it does take awhile to break in a new pistol. After initial clean and lube they break in better if you just use it for 3 to 500 rounds before cleaning again.
 

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GVF, where exactly are you putting grease? This whole lube thing ain't rocket surgery; as long as there is lube (as in 'oil'; there's no need for something more viscous) on the frame/slide rails, locking ribs, link and barrel, you will be fine. If you really have to use grease on anything, the sear is a good place, tho' oil the disconnector.
It's entirely possible that the grease is slowing your slide cycle enough to prevent ejection.
In my experience, it's tough to make a locked-beech pistol (especially a heavy, all steel LBP) malf by not holding it firmly. If your gun is passing the extractor test, try using ordinary oil (Mobile 1 fer' pete's sake) and see how it runs. Use a needle oiler; the lube need not be dripping off.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
GVF, where exactly are you putting grease? This whole lube thing ain't rocket surgery; as long as there is lube (as in 'oil'; there's no need for something more viscous) on the frame/slide rails, locking ribs, link and barrel, you will be fine. If you really have to use grease on anything, the sear is a good place, tho' oil the disconnector.
It's entirely possible that the grease is slowing your slide cycle enough to prevent ejection.
In my experience, it's tough to make a locked-beech pistol (especially a heavy, all steel LBP) malf by not holding it firmly. If your gun is passing the extractor test, try using ordinary oil (Mobile 1 fer' pete's sake) and see how it runs. Use a needle oiler; the lube need not be dripping off.
Moon
Thanks, I will.
 
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