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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. Today I was shooting Blazer .44 Mag 240gr JHP ammo and a round ruptured and ruined my cylinder. My I'm so p.o'd right now that my hands are still shaking.How do I make a claim against them for damages? Have any of you done this? I need help.
 

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Man, that Sucks! Did it crack the cylinder or just scar it some? I cant tell much by the pic. Exactly what did get damaged? I know this dont help much, but be grateful you had a high quality firearm! Things could have been a whole lot worse for you...
 

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Just grab some Oil and a Bronze Bore Brush and have at it a little...should clean up just fine. It just has some vaprized Aluminum Alloy deposited there on the Cylinder Chamber face edge.

A ruptured/burst Shell should not cause any harm to the Cylinder or anything else, but it can leave deposits from the propellent Gasses carrying more or less vaporized molecules of Cartridge Case material from when they were escaping through the crack or opening.
 

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Just grab some Oil and a Bronze Bore Brush and have at it a little...should clean up just fine. It just has some vaprized Aluminum Alloy deposited there on the Cylinder Chember face edge.

A ruptured/burst Shell should not cause any harm to the Cylinder or anything else, but it can leave deposits from the propellent Gasses carrying molecules of Cartridge Case material from when they were escaping through the crack or opening.
I agree. Your Colt isn't hurt. I've had brass cases rupture too. As long as the round wasn't overpressure, no harm was done.
 

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I can't see any definite damage, clean & take another look, as mentioned above.
A ruptured case like that shouldn't "ruin" a cylinder.
DEnis
 

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I stopped using blazers for that reason. I fired 100 rounds of 38spl and each one was slightly cracked in some way shape or form. I stick to brass casings now.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the input guys. Unfortunately, the cylinder chamber is scored right where the rupture occured. You can see and feel a very clear dpression and edge where the damage is.Even if I find a relacement cylinder, I still feel that the gun must be sent to Colt to inspect the frame for any unseeable or microscopic fractures.I called CCI/Speer and left them a message. I also wrote a message on their website.What is going to be REALLY interesting is that my son was video recording me when the round malfunctioned. You can see 3 shots fired, then on the fouth shot you can see the sparks and flames come out of the firing pin side of the cylinder. It is definitely a video that CCI doesn't want on youtube.I hope they suck it up and pay for the damages. I don't care how they do it. They can send a check to Colt for all I care. I miss my baby already.THIS SUCKS.
 

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Oh yeah, if anyone is interested in seeing the video then send me a txt requesting it. My number is 479-216-1988. Also,if anyone has a source for replacement cylinders then I would appreciate if you let me know.
 

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I am missing something - an aluminum case ruptured and made a depression in a steel cylinder? Aluminum is softer than steel as is brass. The bullet was not obstructed so there was probably no pressure build up. That cylinder was designed, engineered and manufactured to handle pressures greater than from a ruptured 240 gr load. Something does not make sense. I am with above clean it real well. That cylinder started as a solid block of steel. I am very surprised it was "damaged"as you indicate.BlackDog
 

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I would really clean it and double check the cylinder because alluminum is softer than brass or steel and absent a event where higher pressures were generated it shouldn't have been damaged.I would definately drop a line with CCI and see what they will do about it......Mike
 

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I think the OP is making a mountain out of a mole hill and there is nothing wrong with the gun that a good cleaning wouldn't cure. That gun was made to withstand more than just a split casing. I don't think Speer is going to do anything about it and sending it back to Colt is a waste of time and money.
 

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IF the picture is not misleading, then it appears that the metal WAS cut away by the hot gases escaping at the rim of the cartridge case. It is not the aluminum in the case that eroded the steel cylinder, which is impossible. It is the same phenomenon that is at work when the top strap of a revolver gets cut by hot gases at the cylinder-barrel gap. Think of it as a cutting torch at work.

It is doubtful that a cylinder can be found. If one cannot be, the gun is not ruined. It may bother you cosmetically, but a brass cartridge will still chamber and fire fine. Semi-automatics have a lot more of the cartridge case unsupported than this tiny bit of non-support, and they do not have the heavy rim and web area that a revolver case has. If you want to go to an extreme in restoring the cylinder, the eroded area could be welded back and then refinished to original contours.

I would not be posting on the CCI web site. I would be taking good pictures and sending a well-written letter by certified mail and ordinary mail to the CCI legal department. Clearly state the problem and what you expect CCI to do. Include a video still of the frame that shows the gases escaping from the rear of the cylinder.

In the meantime, try to find a cylinder from Colt or one of the parts houses so you will have a dollar damage figure in mind. There will be no "microscopic" damage elsewhere since pressures will be lower because of the gases escaping and bleeding off pressure.
 

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We had a gun blew up with CCI ammunition at my range a couple of years back, We contacted CCI with the lot #, unfired rounds, sent pics. They were very cooperative and ended up replacing the firearm.
geichal
 

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IF the picture is not misleading, then it appears that the metal WAS cut away by the hot gases escaping at the rim of the cartridge case. It is not the aluminum in the case that eroded the steel cylinder, which is impossible. It is the same phenomenon that is at work when the top strap of a revolver gets cut by hot gases at the cylinder-barrel gap. Think of it as a cutting torch at work.

It is doubtful that a cylinder can be found. If one cannot be, the gun is not ruined. It may bother you cosmetically, but a brass cartridge will still chamber and fire fine. Semi-automatics have a lot more of the cartridge case unsupported than this tiny bit of non-support, and they do not have the heavy rim and web area that a revolver case has. If you want to go to an extreme in restoring the cylinder, the eroded area could be welded back and then refinished to original contours.

I would not be posting on the CCI web site. I would be taking good pictures and sending a well-written letter by certified mail and ordinary mail to the CCI legal department. Clearly state the problem and what you expect CCI to do. Include a video still of the frame that shows the gases escaping from the rear of the cylinder.

In the meantime, try to find a cylinder from Colt or one of the parts houses so you will have a dollar damage figure in mind. There will be no "microscopic" damage elsewhere since pressures will be lower because of the gases escaping and bleeding off pressure.
Bravo! There's you answer.
I completely agree the fact that aluminum is softer than steel but that their relative densities has nothing to do with the scarring on the cylinder face. The super heated gas is what caused that scarring. DFW's comparison to a cutting torch is perfect. This is also similar (but not exactly the same) to how armor piercing shells penetrate armor. A stream of molten metal and super heated gases are traveling at high speed and focused on a very narrow axis enabling it to penetrate the armor. In the case of APS, the metal is depleted uranium which is a very dense metal from a molecular view, so in that aspect lies the difference in comparisons. The main theory is the same, though.

I hope you get satisfaction from CCI and if needed, some help from Colt. Also, I'm very sorry you had this experience but very happy you didn't get injured.

I've always been very leery of aluminum cased ammo, and I've never bought or used any because of my concerns. I will continue to avoid Blazer for that reason.
 

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Even if there is actual damage, there won't be any to the frame & Colt won't "inspect" it any further than you can yourself. They certainly won't do any in-depth materials analysis to check for "unseeable or microscopic fractures" that won't be there.
I've never heard of a split case's gasses eroding chamber walls. I can understand the principle, just never heard of it.
Denis
 

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JudgeColt's answer makes sense and Malysh your analogy to depleted urnaium APS is even better for a dumb guy like me.

FWIW - I have shot Blazer ammo in my Sig 229 in 40 Caliber and Beretta 92 in 9mm and never had a problem.

BlackDog
 

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I've never heard of a split case's gasses eroding chamber walls.
It is not the chamber wall that is eroded. It is the top edge of the chamber. If the case split along the side, which many aluminum cases do, the gases cannot escape because of the pressure sealing the cartridge to the chamber wall, so there is no "cutting torch"effect. This freak split served to concentrate the gases along the thin top edge of the chamber and they just cut a bit off in "cutting torch" fashion.

Malysh, are you sure DFW made the analogy you quote?
 

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i have been to ranges where they had signs posted to the effect that the aluminum cci blazer ammo was banned due to problems that had arisen in the past.
i thought that was just their way of not having to pick up "worthless" non reloadable casings as opposed to the brass ones they could resell or reload.
this has opened my eyes to the possibility of the ammo being potentially problematic, something i never took seriously before.
 

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I would save any unfired ammo and the box with lot number on it. First deal politely with CCI and of course don't fire anymore of it. If brass ammo fires and ejects OK, I would believe your gun is still safe to fire until you hear of what your options are with a claim. It should be safe to fire the 5 other chambers if the one chamber sticks empty BRASS cases. Colt may still have cylinders for in-house repair if that is what is needed. It may be possible to polish the one chamber and still be in spec. but Colt would know what to do. Other than brushing out the chamber with a wire brush, I wouldn't do any polishing on it myself. I had a bunch of old 38 CCI match wadcutter ammo that was corroded on the outside. Some of it split but at the pressure of 38 match ammo no cylinder damage was done. I have had only a few split cases on high pressure brass cases such as 30-06 in my lifetime and it was noticable but the gas escape hole worked on the 1903 springfield as intended and no visable damage to the chamber or shooter. We are not allowed to fire any aluminum cased ammo out of our duty H&K compact 40 cal. Cartridges of the World 8th edition wrote a whole chapter on aluminum case ammo and the pressures that it can operate safely. I believe it has its applications, one of which is to save money and does work fine in many applications or calibers.
 

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Did you buy the gun used? If so there is also another possibility that must be accounted for. Perhaps a previous somehow owner gouged the cylinder there and left the depression you are feeling now. It was no problem and never noticed with brass ammo but with an aluminium case it ruptured there. ie: the cylinder caused the case to fail, not the other way around. Do you have any empties from before the rupture? either brass or aluminium? Examine them and see if any show bulging in the area affected. Not saying this is what happened...just saying this is a possibility and CCI will want to know all particulars about the gun too! Glad you were not hurt. I have had case ruptures too but all were with brass (recently in a 348 Winchester) and never suffered any gun or personal damage, but they are scary and definitely not what is supposed to happen! Shoot blazer a LOT in my 357, 40, and 45 and never had one of them rupture that I can recall.
 
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