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The threads Colt used on revolvers in those days were .5634-32 tapered.

These are not standard dies or taps so you'll have to find a company that makes them.
Do an internet search for tap and die makers.

A fast search turned up this company that advertises gun maker tooling. No idea what the pricing would be........

 

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I'll ask why you want to chase the threads - and I'll suggest that you might want to hesitate.

If you have the barrel and frame from a gun that was assembled properly, chasing the threads can lead to a change of the 'thread timing' when you go to reassemble the parts

That will/would affect the position of the front sight once everything is settled and tight

There are ways to clean the threads without chasing them with taps and dies
 

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Thank you for the advice. The frame was without barrel and the replacement only threads half-way.
You're going to need a better-than-usual gunsmith who understands revolvers (specifically these) to properly set that barrel

There's more to it than simply screwing it on the gun

The cost and effort will be worth it
A typical gun mechanic (most people who call themselves gunsmiths barely qualify for that) could end up screwing up your revolver and the replacement barrel
 

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Can anyone tell me the tap & die sizes for an early Colt Detective or where they may be purchased?
Thank you, Merry Christmas.
To my knowledge they are no taps or dies for the tapered threads on these older revolvers. Whoever it was that decided to use tapered threads must have been smoking too much evidence. To my knowledge no other manufacture ever used that style of threads. I have delt with quite a few barrel jobs and for the most part the threads in the frame just need to be cleaned up, use a wire brush. Now to the meat of the situation, I have a separate tail stock for my lathe, and it is set up with the proper amount of off set to match the angle (taper) of the threads. Then the threads are single point chased so it will screw into the frame hand tight with the front sight about 2 o'clock so when barrel s tightened the front sight is sitting at 12 o'clock the torque will hold the barrel tight to the frame. A lot of the barrels I have run into even if new will not screw into the frame properly, most will not screw all the way in. Sometimes the shoulder of the barrel will need to be set back also. So how much? One complete turn with 32 TPI threads mounts to .03125 so if you only need a half turn divide that number by two. The amount of travel with threaded parts is easily figured by dividing 1 by the number of threads per inch. When chasing threads just skin the threads for the first time then see where you need to go from there because as with all tapered objects a small amount removed will cause the tapered object to inter way out of proportion to the amount of material removed.

Frank Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To my knowledge they are no taps or dies for the tapered threads on these older revolvers. Whoever it was that decided to use tapered threads must have been smoking too much evidence. To my knowledge no other manufacture ever used that style of threads. I have delt with quite a few barrel jobs and for the most part the threads in the frame just need to be cleaned up, use a wire brush. Now to the meat of the situation, I have a separate tail stock for my lathe, and it is set up with the proper amount of off set to match the angle (taper) of the threads. Then the threads are single point chased so it will screw into the frame hand tight with the front sight about 2 o'clock so when barrel s tightened the front sight is sitting at 12 o'clock the torque will hold the barrel tight to the frame. A lot of the barrels I have run into even if new will not screw into the frame properly, most will not screw all the way in. Sometimes the shoulder of the barrel will need to be set back also. So how much? One complete turn with 32 TPI threads mounts to .03125 so if you only need a half turn divide that number by two. The amount of travel with threaded parts is easily figured by dividing 1 by the number of threads per inch. When chasing threads just skin the threads for the first time then see where you need to go from there because as with all tapered objects a small amount removed will cause the tapered object to inter way out of proportion to the amount of material removed.

Frank Glenn
Hello Frank, thank you for your expertise, I found that to be exactly the case. Up the creek without any paddles.
 
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