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I know someone will say "you don`t buy guns for investment, they were made to be shot" well like collecting coins or stamps I think collecting quality(98% or better)firearms is just as good an investment, and far more fun than stocks(ever fondled a stock certificate? not nearly as much fun as fondling a python). Anyway, in the next 5 years what colts do you think will appreciate the most in value? I am also collecting older winchester and remington .22 rifles for investment, all to be sold in the next 5 to 10 years to finance my early retirement.
 

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Well Kennedy,
that same subject is the exact reason the Classic/Muscle car market took off like it did.
Those same thoughts came to people that thought driving an investment versus seeing some numbers on paper would be much more fun.
Classic cars have tripled & quadrupled in the past few years. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
Now, if your crystal ball will tell (only) the members of this board what guns will blast off within the next 5 years, I'll be happy to buy the drinks next time we all get together. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 

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I think collecting Colts should be first an investment in personal and intellectual rewards. I got into it purely for the history and contribution to firearms that Colts have given. That is where the 'money' is for me. Making great monetary gains is cool, but unlikely. You probably have a better chance of doubling the value of a index stock fund in 10 years than a handful of Colts (also probably have an easier time selling the fund also...no ATF!) I hate to sound like a doubting Thomas but if you want to invest real money in preparation for something important as your retirement fund...I would take the odds on favorite but boring stock market. If not, buy dem Colts like crazy!
 

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I think older Colts in really good condition will increase in value and I do view my purchases considering them a good investment. But I have no notion of ever selling them off. (Parish the thought!) When I am ninety, I still want to be fondling my 99+% 1963 4" blue Python. What a wonderful feeling. I hope I can find someone to pass them on to that will keep them and cherish them as they should be.

These are Colt lovers here and I don't think you will find many who will subscribe to the idea of using them for long or short term monetary gain (no offense intended).
 

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Hello all, This is my first post. I'm very pleased to have such large interest in Revolvers.....13 were viewing Revolvers when I logged on. I am also most interested in revolvers.

I do collect Revolvers and have been for only 4 years. A Colt guru took me under his wing for a couple of years and I learned so much from him. Now I'm on my own but he's there if I ever need him. The collecting community is always available to help the newbies. We were all there at one time.

I started out making mistakes. My first purchase was a 1959 Nickel Python. I was hoping for factory nickel and by the looks of the finish it appeared to pass for factory. Imagine a "possible" earliest known Python in Nickel knowing that they weren't cataloged until 1962. The factory letter came back with a blued finish. The nickel cleaned up very well and it looked awesome. It had the factory stocks and they were mint. I don't want any fakes laying around so I sold it for a 100% profit. I don't buy and sell for profit but the fake had to go.

My next mistake was a purchase of a 3" Python. It also turned out to be a fake. I was told that I would never recoup my money but I did and made a $100.

I guess there is always an unsuspecting fool (like I was) to unload the mistakes. To some people (non collectors) it doesn't matter if it's a fake or not.

I've learned a lot since and I now finding myself purging guns that no longer fit my "collecting mission statement". My last purchase that I am very excited about is a Shooting Master in a 45LC purchased for $1600. He also had one in a .357 mag for $1300. It wasn't a great deal plus I was gun poor with the purchase of the 45LC.

I'm now working on purchasing a prototype Detective Special in Nickel. Deals like this take a lot of time and patience. I just missed out on a very rare if no one-of-a-kind 1938 Officers Model in a Single Action with custom leather felt lined holster and it did letter as authentic. Oh well, you win some and lose some. Who knows what these guns are actually worth. The buyer and seller must come to an agreement.

A Courier is a great start if you’re on a budget. I wouldn't say it'd appreciate fastest in value but for the price and only 3000 produced it's a great start. I have found that there are errors including the "book of colt firearms". Look at the expired auctions and all you ever see is .22's for sale. Seldom do you see a .32NP for sale. I have 2 .32NP's. One with a steel cylinder and one with an alloy cylinder.

In closing, Do a lot of research either on line or and you must purchase the "Book of Colt Firearms" by Wilson/Sutherland. Good luck and enjoy the search. I get such a rush when I locate the "right" gun. BTW: I spend at least 1 hour daily searching firearms for sale. Only one is catch my eye currently. A Colt pump shotgun (only 2000 produced) in excellent condition for $239. This is a great price for a low production.

Later,

Addicted
 

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[ QUOTE ]
I think older Colts in really good condition will increase in value and I do view my purchases considering them a good investment. But I have no notion of ever selling them off. (Parish the thought!) When I am ninety, I still want to be fondling my 99+% 1963 4" blue Python. What a wonderful feeling. I hope I can find someone to pass them on to that will keep them and cherish them as they should be.

These are Colt lovers here and I don't think you will find many who will subscribe to the idea of using them for long or short term monetary gain (no offense intended).

[/ QUOTE ]

Amen Bro, Buy and hold. I may sell in 30-40 years or hand them down to my family if they have the same care and passion as I do.
 

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In 5 to 10 years most any Colt will give you a return for your investment, but probably not enough for any kind of retirement unless something drastic happens (even then only a few models may be affected). Investing for retirement is something that should have been started 20 to 30 years ago to be able to reap large rewards. Only a few models have drastically jumped in price.
Most of us collect/accumulate/amass our assortment of Colts (and other brands) for personal enjoyment. Now when I old and decrepit and funds run low I could probably turn a quick buck to tide me thru, but hopefully I will be able to leave everything to my youngest son. He keeps inventory every so often to make sure nothing slips by him. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

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Addicted: Nice to see some new faces on the board. You have a great little collection. I would probably be best described as an accumulator versus a true collector. Ocasionally, I have lapes and start to think I'm a collector. Then, I see what other folks have already and I have a long long way to go.

I hope my colt "collection" appreciates. Frankly, other than a few models, I believe you are better with mutual funds if money is your goal.
 

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22 rim: Mutual funds can go down in value. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

Your will never loose on the 'right' Colt.

What I posted was a partial. I hope to post the addiction in one photo in a couple of days.

Financially, the boxed Bankers Special was a hard cookie to swallow. At the last Tulse gun show there were only .38's, the buyers were looking for .22LR's

BTW: I admire those .22LR (and .22 mag) revolvers. Few were built (in some models) due to the lightweight caliber. Back in the day, most buyers went for the .38
 

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I collect almost exclusively 22 revolvers these days. Yep, I have a nice Bankers too and several Couriers! Every now and then, I have an urge to pick up something else. History has shown that I eventually sell everything other than the 22's.

With limited funds, you have to focus on what you like the best.

Yes on the mutual funds.... you know what they say.... history shows an average 10-12% growth.
 

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22 rim: What would be your dream .22? Maybe you already have your dream in your .22 BS.
 

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I would suggest collecting for the fun of it and not the investment. To show you how good or bad guns can be for an investment just look at 30 year old NIB guns for sale on the auction sites and adjust the price for inflation. You will see that most of them haven't gained much, if any. If you pick well you might make some money. An ex. would be for those who bought machine guns over 10 years ago. Some of those people can retire on the money that they made, but that is the exception. The nice part about collecting, especially if you keep them NIB (or excellent condition if you bought them used)is that you usually don't lose alot of money. That usually applies if you picked quality, desirable guns in the first place.

Good Luck
 

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My dream Colt 22 wants change from year to year. But currently, there are two that I want (alot) (1) First Generation SSA originally chambered for 22, (2) 2.5" Nickel Diamonback 22 Revolver in NIB condition. Both take deep pockets. I find that there is always another one that I want. I am not planning on going to any special trouble to acquire the DB... if it happens, it happens. The SAA is beyond my means.
 

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22 rimfire? Have you handled an SAA that is in .22 ?? Needless to say,they are very heavy-close to 3 pounds with 7.5" bbl.

Rude awakening to the guys who have always handled Ruger Single Sixes,and the Colt "Frontier Scout" series.

USFA makes a great reproduction of the .22 Flatop Target,pricey,but a helluva lot cheaper than an original 22 SAA.

Me,I am just content with a couple of 1950's Great Westerns,full sized. One a fix sighted 5.5" and the other,the very rare 4" Deputy Model with factory bbl. rib and adjustable sights.

Bud
 

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If I actually HAD an original 22 rimfire Firt Generation SSA, it would never be shot and I wouldn't care if it weighted 10 lbs. (I am not trying to be smart.) They are purely collector pieces. I don't shoot my Diamondbacks; why would I want to shoot something that is over a hundred years old? I would actually like to get a DB shooter; I love those revolvers-always have since I first became aware of them in the 70's. In general, I prefer double action revolvers although I would not mind owning a Freedom Arms hand cannon.
 

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Most things we spend money on are of diminishing value, a new car for example. Some things are of no value instantly, a meal at a nice restaurant. Money spent on quality firearms becomes a hard asset that maintains value and often appreciates, although I would quess that few guns can equal the stock market growth over the long term. One sad fact that we must all consider, whether we are collectors or investors, is the effect one really bad piece of legislation could have on us all.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Most things we spend money on are of diminishing value, a new car for example. Some things are of no value instantly, a meal at a nice restaurant. Money spent on quality firearms becomes a hard asset that maintains value and often appreciates, although I would quess that few guns can equal the stock market growth over the long term. One sad fact that we must all consider, whether we are collectors or investors, is the effect one really bad piece of legislation could have on us all.

[/ QUOTE ]

Dee, I don't think legislation will get through in my lifetime.

It's possilbe to collect investment guns and I do just that.
 

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Addict, I do hope you are right. My interest in firearms predates the Gun Control Act of 1968. Imagine today ordering a gun and it's delivered to your house, no license, no paperwork, low prices.... oh my, I'm getting flashbacks!
 

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As in the case of muscle cars, pony cars and anything that has a appeal to dedicated followers, Colt, or any other firearms, are an excellent investment if purchased right. Remember that your money is made when you buy the piece, not when you sell it. If you over pay for anything you reduce or eliminate its value as an investment.
The way I find many collectible items is simply looking in the right places. Don't expect to find great deals on desirable items on the Internet or in most stores.
I have scored big time driving the back roads and asking questions.
For example, I located two 1873 Colt SSA revolvers at a country home, in rural Alabama, in 1985. I purchased the pair for $2000. They were both .45 Colt caliber with 7 1/2 inch barrels and built in the late 19th century. One was excellent mechanically with little remaining finish. The other would almost pass for new.
That investment proved to be the single best I ever made when I recently sold the pair to a collector.
We bought an early Henry rifle, coated with grease, from behind a lady's stove in New Orleans, for fifty dollars, that cleaned up to excellent condition. I was hoping for an iron frame, but didn't complain when I uncovered brass.
Ask around and you'll find some pretty wonderful things in closets and trunks.
I'm not an expert on Colt products, but I've been an antique dealer for most of my life and was a firearms dealer for almost thirty years.
 
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