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I was just given this pistol by my wife’s father. It is in basically new condition, like it just came out of the box, and appears to never have been fired from going through it in detail. The scene on the cylinder retains 100% of the detail and no rust anywhere on it. Every serial number matches. Based on my research, this serial 168204 was made in 1867. It has a “K” stamped in many places and has cartouche of BH on the grips so assume it was first provided to the military?

Colt’s archive request in PDF show up to serial numbers 140000 so it doesn’t look like I can order a letter on it but no idea why. Any other ideas on how to find any history on it or would anyone else have info?

I am assuming it is legitimate and not a fake but the immaculate condition gives me a second of pause given the pictures I have been seeing of 150 year old examples.

Thanks for any insight!
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Sorry I can’t help much. I’m a total novice when it comes to percussion. I have a Pietta 1860.

The first thing I noticed with your 1860 is while the frame is notched for a rifle stock the frame does not have the 4th screw to support it. Was this common?
 

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Sorry I can’t help much. I’m a total novice when it comes to percussion. I have a Pietta 1860.

The first thing I noticed with your 1860 is while the frame is notched for a rifle stock the frame does not have the 4th screw to support it. Was this common?
The later models did not have the 4th screw
Hopefully the experts will reply
 

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Welcome to the COLT Forum from the Cradle Of Liberty...Pennsylvania !!



Enjoy Our Community Sir...and as far as your questions, I'll defer to the experts on that being a 150+year old firearm given it's magnificent condition.

.
 

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Welcome to the Colt forum . The barrel address should read New -York U. S. America . I believe yours reads , New - Yore . Wear the piece of tape is should be the U . S . The B H cartouche is incorrect . Ben Hannis did inspect 3rd model dragoons until Nov. 1861. No record of him inspecting 1860 Army's . Sorry . The good news is, it may be a shooter . Happy Easter
 

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The later models did not have the 4th screw
Hopefully the experts will reply
Thanks! I didn’t know that. Apparently it was found that they were not needed at some point in production. I always thought the 1860 looked too busy with four screws.
 

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hello, in 1857 colt was on the way to the firearms manufacturing "terlet" it was expected that s&w would receive an extension on their metallic cartridge patent which was keeping the door shut on that new and expanding market for colt and others. this may have been an update of the 1960 in an attempt to sell some arms. were it mine, i would contact one of the remaining few experts in the field for their opinion as to whether they think it was actually made by colt. i believe it has a good chance of being legitimate. colt were laying off workers, and sometimes employees were gifted special arme in lieu of salary or bonuses. some of those were never touched. also may have been set to a trooper in the west which arrived too late and could have been returned to the family.

regards, bro
 

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It looks to be an original 3-screw Army which has been, er, “enhanced” in recent years. Many markings are modern hand stampings, the military markings are spurious, and it has been totally refinished. Still displays well, just not much collector value.
 

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It looks to be an original 3-screw Army which has been, er, “enhanced” in recent years. Many markings are modern hand stampings, the military markings are spurious, and it has been totally refinished. Still displays well, just not much collector value.
desron, do you think the serial number is legitimate? it is true refreshing does hurt perceived value, but i am reminded often the colonial glassware that was chipped selling for actual pocket change in the '50's and 60's now bringing fabulous prices (especially south new jersey glass) so eventually, scratches of any type give character.
regards, bro
 

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It looks to be an original 3-screw Army which has been, er, “enhanced” in recent years. Many markings are modern hand stampings, the military markings are spurious, and it has been totally refinished. Still displays well, just not much collector value.
It also has new bolt, trigger, hammer, and rammer pivot screws. Some one has taken great pains to refinish this revolver.

Originally, Colt tried to sell his Type 3 attachable stock, mostly through US Army contracts: one stock per two revolvers, basically giving the stocks away and hoping the idea would catch-on, which it did not. The civilian market wanted nothing to do with it. That left Colt with many frames that had the recoil shields CFS (cut-for-stock) left in inventory that Colt needed to use. The frames were not drilled and tapped for the "4th-screw" escutcheons, thus many were produced this way. There were actually some 1851 Navy .36 revolvers made this way.

Regards,

Jim
 

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the color of the case hardened frame looks not good for me, almost like the chemical color of Italian revolvers
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
At first I thought this might be a 2nd or 3rd generation Colt from the 1950's to 1970's but the serial numbers don't make sense. This serial number was only used on the 1867 manufactured gun. ** I just looked and the "York" definitely has a "k" at the end, not an "e".

Any idea where I can find an expert that could help tell me what I might actually have here?
 

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As I recall, the last shipment of the Colt Army to the government was made in 1863. There would have been no need for cartouches on grips after this date, and certainly not in 1867. Does the number on the grip match the serial on the gun? Also, no other military acceptance marks (such as the ‘PP’ on the cylinder) would have been appropriate. Something here doesn’t seem to fit.

jpn
 

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At first I thought this might be a 2nd or 3rd generation Colt from the 1950's to 1970's but the serial numbers don't make sense. This serial number was only used on the 1867 manufactured gun. ** I just looked and the "York" definitely has a "k" at the end, not an "e".

Any idea where I can find an expert that could help tell me what I might actually have here?
hello, you could contact greg martin or ellis at nra. your cylinder appears to be pristine. if no sailors can be found on the decks of the american ships the cylinder roll is most likely bogus - according to colt cylinder scenes by tobias page 110. of course, the original dies may have been destroyed or lost after the fire.
regards, bro
 
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