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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
More pics added at the bottom of the thread.
I just got 137,139 1860 Colt.
Numbers all match. Brown patina.
It's missing the wedge screw, can they still be found?
Lodgewood.com, got one!
Can someone give me a BORN date please?
Thanks very much, Terry


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It's missing the wedge screw, can they still be found? Lodgewood.com
 
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Thank you! I used that for my year. Was hoping to find a month to go with it.

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To my knowledge the exact date of manufacturer is not available, only the shipment date to the customer through Colts Archive Service. These letters are not inexpensive and depend on the vintage of the pistol. There was a major fire at the Colt factory in 1864 and many records were lost. There were other subsequent records 'misplaced' over the years so there are gaps where some years are not available.

See this site for info and what a typical archive letter includes: https://www.colt.com/Customer-Services/Archive-Services
 

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Was hoping to find a month to go with it.
Urban Dictionary of STICKY. "Those topics which are always displayed at the top of the topic list in internet forums. Usually, a sticky topic is a topic that will interest a lot of users, so it is displayed first."

Look at the first STICKY in the Percussion Forum, Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver Date of Shipment Listing.

Mr. SWOwner appears to have put considerable effort into compiling the list. His post #5, 4-13-2016, 9:10 PM, should interest you. The only way to know for sure your exact shipping date is to pay Colt $300 or so for a letter. SWOwner's information is free and should give you a pretty close time frame.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Urban Dictionary of STICKY. "Those topics which are always displayed at the top of the topic list in internet forums. Usually, a sticky topic is a topic that will interest a lot of users, so it is displayed first."

Look at the first STICKY in the Percussion Forum, Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver Date of Shipment Listing.

Mr. SWOwner appears to have put considerable effort into compiling the list. His post #5, 4-13-2016, 9:10 PM, should interest you. The only way to know for sure your exact shipping date is to pay Colt $300 or so for a letter. SWOwner's information is free and should give you a pretty close time frame.
Ok, thanks guys for your help. It would be nice to know.
But the main thing is she's 1863 and has the inspector stamps on the hand grips. So we know she was probably carried by a soldier during the CW.
Thanks again!

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This STICKY is awesome! Thanks for telling me about it.
When said 137,114 has been identified, can you explain?
Is he just recording all serial numbers still around today?

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Congratulations on your Colt 1860!. The links above provide a great roadmap to knowing your firearm's history. I have an 1862 which I both display and shot. If your's is in good condition, I hope you will consider putting some rounds downrange. If you do, here are some of my thoughts.
1) Take your time. Don't set a "shot by date." Rather, be sure the gun is ready. It took several months to get the original nipples out and cleaned on my '62. Once out, they cleaned up great. Here is a link to my early posts and the ones about cleaning the nipples.
2) If you are concerned about dangerous cracks that are unseen, you can use Magnaflux to find any cracks. Since I work on guns as an FFL, I have a home Magnaflux kit. Sadly, some of their best products have recently been discontinued. Most engine replace shops will do this for a minimal fee. Otherwise, go to your auto store and ask for crack checking spray...they should have a two or three step process you can use at home. Follow directions and take your time. While doing this, read up on what constitutes "fatal flaw" verse small hair cracks that could have been there from day one. This is a great time to do your homework.
3) Use a light load and load just one cylinder at a time to prevent any chance of chair-fires. I used 22 gr. FFF, a 454 ball and 10# Remington primer. Perfect. I must confess that orginally I was too cautious and used a 12 gr. FFF, and the ball ended up in the barrel. Thankfully, it came out fine and a lesson was learned.

Enjoy your gun, whether it be an addition to a collection or a collectable shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Congratulations on your Colt 1860!. The links above provide a great roadmap to knowing your firearm's history. I have an 1862 which I both display and shot. If your's is in good condition, I hope you will consider putting some rounds downrange. If you do, here are some of my thoughts.
1) Take your time. Don't set a "shot by date." Rather, be sure the gun is ready. It took several months to get the original nipples out and cleaned on my '62. Once out, they cleaned up great. Here is a link to my early posts and the ones about cleaning the nipples.
2) If you are concerned about dangerous cracks that are unseen, you can use Magnaflux to find any cracks. Since I work on guns as an FFL, I have a home Magnaflux kit. Sadly, some of their best products have recently been discontinued. Most engine replace shops will do this for a minimal fee. Otherwise, go to your auto store and ask for crack checking spray...they should have a two or three step process you can use at home. Follow directions and take your time. While doing this, read up on what constitutes "fatal flaw" verse small hair cracks that could have been there from day one. This is a great time to do your homework.
3) Use a light load and load just one cylinder at a time to prevent any chance of chair-fires. I used 22 gr. FFF, a 454 ball and 10# Remington primer. Perfect. I must confess that orginally I was too cautious and used a 12 gr. FFF, and the ball ended up in the barrel. Thankfully, it came out fine and a lesson was learned.

Enjoy your gun, whether it be an addition to a collection or a collectable shooter.
Thanks so much for that information.
It would be really neat to shoot a piece of history.
Great forum here!
Thanks guys!

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Finally cleaned up! The left Hand grip had a repair top left. Has 2 little bitty 1/16" wooden dowels made of walnut drilled in to hold it. Still end piece broke off. Bore looks very good, pitting of course, I've seen worse!


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