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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just acquired my first 1911, serial number begins with a "G70" then 02xxx so it has a serial # under 03000, the blue book states that it was manufacured in 1970 new range! Can anyone tell me what changed with the "new range" series 70 COLT 1911 compared to 1969 and before?? Pic soon!

 

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The major change was the switch to a different type of barrel bushing. This bushing dramatically increased the "out of the box" accuracy. I bought one of the original 700 series 70 that were made up of left over frames before the new serial numbers. These were marked with a "BB" stamped after the serial number. Instant "collectable".....however since I was a shooter, not a collector, I had Jim Clark add a set of Smith & Wesson revolver sights,, re-work the feed ramp and stipple the grip. when I went pick it up in Shreveport he told me how amazed he was that it shot so well with literally no internal work done. He then proceeded to give me the test target....10 shots into 2 inches @ 50 yards! Needless to say, I was pleased.

The 70 series is outstanding...much better than the 80's. I wish I sill had mine.
 

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As mentioned the primary difference is the barrel bushing. It's called a collet bushing. It has 4 fingers grasping the barrel instead of a typical cylindrically shaped bushing which goes around the barrel along the entire length of the bushing.

The minor differences are generally cosmetic. The slide stampings of post war Govt. Models from the resumption of civilian production to 1969 are different than the Series 70 stampings, commonly referred to as "billboard stamped" because of the large size of the Series 70 stamping. At some point, Colt made the "billboard" stamping somewhat smaller. Another difference is the material and look of the grips. Again (as with the slide stamping), from early post war examples to 1969, Colt used plastic grips called Coltwood. There are two basic types of Coltwood grips. Colt decided to go back to wood grips when they introduced the Series 70, replacing the Coltwood grips used for approx. 23-24 years. With the Series 70 wood grips there are two basic types, checkered walnut with silver medallions and ones with no checkering and medallions that are sandblasted instead. Other minor differences concern the using of left over Colt 1911A1 parts in the commercial Govt. models in the period immediately after WWII when civilian production was resumed. The surplus A1 parts ran out in a fairly short period of time.
There's an awful lot to cover in this topic and I have to be briefer than usual (I hear other members clapping!). I have a boat out back to clean up. Besides, there are other members with far more expertise than I who may decide to provide you with some information :)

I'd suggest doing an advanced search with keywords like Coltwood, pre Series 70, collet bushing, etc. to get into more detail about the differences.
 

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What makes a Colt Government Model a true MKIV/Series 70 is the MKIV collet barrel bushing and barrel.
There are no Series 70 Commanders.
The new Colt Series 70s are only Series 70s because the don't have the Series 80 firing pin safety. And even this is incorrect because the pre-Series 70 pistols have the same lockwork, and firing pin system as the original 1911 and ommercial Gov't Model.
 
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