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This was given to me from my father in law many years ago.
I have not ever shot it, but will unless it would devalue it.
looking for thoughts on the value, guesstimate on year made.

I will be keeping this, just would like to know more about what I have, an advice on what not to do.
thanks Ed
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You can't shoot what you have here as you don't have a complete firearm. You would have to purchase either a .45 or .38 cal. 1911 (see tag on end of box) and install this conversion kit to fire .22 cal. ammo.

Randy
 

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You can also check on Ebay under Colt .22 Conversion, there are always a number of these listed there too.

Randy
 

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I've been following these on the different auction sites for a few years. Post war era (like your's) sell in the $500 range with box and box contents. I can't enlarge your pic's, but it looks like it's from the mid 50's. The tell being the flat Colt-Accro rear sight body and the "Colt's Manufacturing Co" on the bottom-inside of the box. If it were mine, I would shoot it without hesitation. In my opinion, you're not going to devalue it by shooting it a few times. These aren't worth big money anyways, so why not use it as intended. They are actually quite fun to use. I have 2 of them that I've posted many times with targets on the Forum.
 

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Lube the floating chamber well, and keep it clean - use 'good' ammunition (Remington's 'Golden Bullets' work well in all of mine - lube the slide rails -
 

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The FLAT Accro was used from 1954 through 1964. The left roll-stamp was the same throughout that range. The Right roll-stamp changed in 1959. If the Box is original to the unit,...it is from 1959 to 1964. A better picture showing the detail of the right roll-stamp would nail it down.
 

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Agreed with the valuation of at least $500. I too keep an eye on the assorted Colt conversion kits on ebay. The original box helps, the wax paper also looks original. If the instructions are missing reproductions are available cheaply.
The earlier versions with the Coltmaster rear sight seem to bring a bit more, but maybe because owners who have guns made in the very early post war period who want the correct kit are willing to bid higher.
If I had a nice pre-Series 70 I'd sure pay $500 or more for a kit like the OP's. Especially given the cost of firing factory .45 hardball these days, if you can even find some for sale.
 

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The best way to value your Conversion Unit imo would be to follow the listings on eBay.
Even though the prices seem to have increased some for these conversions $500 still seems to be a good base price for a nice boxed Unit.
Someone had listed quite a few conversions in the 7-8 hundred $ range and they didn't seem to be moving.
 

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Nice "conversion kit" if I were you I would use it sometimes with good ammo.
 

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Don't hesitate to use it. Judging by several clues from the pictures, it is probably not NIB. If it does have a #2 (stamped on the back) slide stop you are in good shape for having a proper kit. I ask sellers whenever I see one on GB at a reasonable price if the slide stop is marked #2 and more times than not it isn't.
 

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Lube the floating chamber well, and keep it clean - use 'good' ammunition (Remington's 'Golden Bullets' work well in all of mine - lube the slide rails -
I agree with lubing it well & cleaning it often. I neglected to do that once & had a heck of a time getting the floating chamber out of the barrel.
 

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I like shooting my Colt Conversion! I've also got 3 or 4 stashed away--maybe if I ever had to cannibalize one for parts...lol...oh wait, I did buy a slide a couple of years back and had the parts on hand to complete another kit.;)

The asking prices for a complete kit, with original box, have gone up dramatically--what used to sell for $500 flea-bayers are now asking for $700 +/-. Magazines are $150 or more, Triple K's are up to $90! Most of the kits/magazines don't move at those prices--it seems like an auction will set a "high water mark" for a popular item and within a week everyone's asking for the moon! With the box and wrapping papers, all the parts plus the original instructions I would have to have at least $700 for me to even consider selling it, if it were mine.

When I shoot mine, I put a drop of Kroil between the floating chamber and the barrel to lube it and when I'm done I use more Kroil and a "big 45" stainless steel "wool" ball to clean off all the crud. I can usually shoot it 500-700 times (over 3-4 outings) before needing to "deep clean" the kit but it's worth the effort--they're fun to shoot.

BTW, use good ammo, get good results.
 

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Mine has been working just fine, its a hit or miss on the brand of ammo it wants to eat. As most have said, keep it clean and it will work fine. As for price, got mine for under the 500 mark, got lucky, and its in excellent condition.
 

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Like just about everything else gun-related, complete NIB items usually bring the highest prices when they're sold. Well-used and cared-for guns/items may sell for less, but you can't even begin to put a price on the satisfaction of the owner.

If the money will get you something you can enjoy, sell it. If you want to have fun, shoot it!
 

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This may be obvious but no one has brought it up. There are 22 conversion units for Series 70 and Series 80 pistols. Make sure you match the conversion unit up with the correct frame. If yours is from the 50-60's..your donor receiver will have to be a 70 Series with no FPS mechanism.
 

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Just to clarify, the post war era Colt .22 Conversion Units will work with a Series 70 Colt frame, however you will need to use a non Series 70 collet barrel bushing on the Conversion Unit.
 
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