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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My .22 New Frontier was manufactured in 1974, serial # L233XX. The barrel is 4.375" and it has two cylinders - one for 22 magnum and one for .22 rf.
The problem I have with it is that it shoots 4" high with 22 rf at 50 feet, with the rear sight adjusted as far down as possible. 22 Mag shoots a little lower (higher velocity) but is still high. It appears to me that the sights were set up for the long barreled New Frontier and never changed in specs for the short barreled model (just a guess).
I really like this revolver but the sight problem makes it not much fun to shoot. Any suggestions other than modifying the sights (too much of a collectible piece to do) ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[ QUOTE ]
Maybe I'm not thinking straight but, bringing the rear sight down would make you hit your mark higher. Right? Wouldn't you want to bring the rear sight up do shoot lower? Maybe you're doing the right thing and I am just misunderstanding the terminology.

[/ QUOTE ]

Bringing the rear sight down makes the bullet hit lower
Bringing the front sight down makes the bullet hit higher
 

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Hi, I have the same gun from 1977.Mine shoots high as well. Have you tried differant brands of ammo first to see what tight groups come of it? Mine seems to like CCi Stingers ,Winchester Super X 40gr hp,and Rem Yellow Jackets.So shoot for groups and let us know how tight you get at say 25 yards.The Stingers shoot the flattest and almost deadon at 10 yards thru 25 yards.My rear sight is also at its lowest.There is a little bit of meat on that rear blade to grind down the top and recut the depth of the notch which should also do the trick.You can get a new rear blade from Numrich so you dont alter the stock one. unscrew the windage screw out and with a punch insert it in while pushing the blade all the way left and it will come out from the top I think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
[ QUOTE ]
Hi, I have the same gun from 1977.Mine shoots high as well. Have you tried differant brands of ammo first to see what tight groups come of it? Mine seems to like CCi Stingers ,Winchester Super X 40gr hp,and Rem Yellow Jackets.So shoot for groups and let us know how tight you get at say 25 yards.The Stingers shoot the flattest and almost deadon at 10 yards thru 25 yards.My rear sight is also at its lowest.There is a little bit of meat on that rear blade to grind down the top and recut the depth of the notch which should also do the trick.You can get a new rear blade from Numrich so you dont alter the stock one. unscrew the windage screw out and with a punch insert it in while pushing the blade all the way left and it will come out from the top I think?

[/ QUOTE ]
Thanks for the info. I'll try the different ammo first and then maybe modify rear sight blade.
Will let you know how she groups. Haven't shot it much.
Colt made a beautiful little .22 when they turned out this piece. We won't see anything like it again.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
Maybe I'm not thinking straight but, bringing the rear sight down would make you hit your mark higher. Right? Wouldn't you want to bring the rear sight up do shoot lower? Maybe you're doing the right thing and I am just misunderstanding the terminology.

[/ QUOTE ]

Bringing the rear sight down makes the bullet hit lower
Bringing the front sight down makes the bullet hit higher

[/ QUOTE ]

Your right. Both my wife and my mother swear that I'm dyslexic (sp?). Maybe they're right. /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif
 

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Hello everyone I just traded a couple of my Damascus knives for this and I was just wondering about the value and if the missing N in new frontier was something that happened allot and if that affected the value in anyway? It’s not been fired nearest I can tell and both cylinders have had very little rotating and haven’t been spun any that I can tell. Thanks for any info
 

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Welcome to the COLT Forum from the Cradle Of Liberty...Pennsylvania !!



Enjoy Our Community Sir...and Congrats on your Colt New Frontier !!

Now I will leave you with the forum experts as far as condition and value.
.
 

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I'd say value around $550 to $600, maybe a little more if you have the extra cylinder, box and papers. I've looked at a lot of New Frontier .22 revolvers and have never seen one missing the "N". I wonder how that happened? It won't hurt the "shootability" of the gun, but certainly detracts from the collector value.
- Bruce in Ohio
 

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I'd say value around $550 to $600, maybe a little more if you have the extra cylinder, box and papers. I've looked at a lot of New Frontier .22 revolvers and have never seen one missing the "N". I wonder how that happened? It won't hurt the "shootability" of the gun, but certainly detracts from the collector value.
- Bruce in Ohio
I don’t know how it happened but you can tell it was never even tried to be stamped. All the other letters are perfect but it reads “EW FRONTIER” instead of normal.
 

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That's an uncommon factory error.
Either the "N" portion was damaged and failed to make in imprint, or more likely the roll stamping die was miss-aligned and the "N" simply wasn't stamped.

This probably won't affect the value one way or another.
Some people might not want to pay a fair value due to the defect, some collector might pay a little more for a factory error gun.

The stamping was applied with a roll stamp die. If it was damaged, or if the die was improperly rotated in the jig the "N" would not be stamped.

Here' what the dies look like.......
Wood Font Rectangle Belt Metal
Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Rectangle Artifact Font
 
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