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Discussion Starter #1
I have a .357 Model that is approx 1960 vintage. It is in what I think is the original box complete with test target and warranty card stub. The grips on it are like on the Trooper model of that era as pictured in the 1960 Gun Digest. I thought all .357 Models came with the target style grips like on the Python. Can anyone confirm that the smaller grips came on some .357 Models? TIA

I am a regular on some forums and collect the 1922 Series Springfield Rifles and 1903 NRA Sporters. I am a newcomer here and am looking forward to being part of this group.
 

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Mine has the full checkered stocks and target trigger, it was made in '61. I was told mine not be original since the consensus is the stock change occured sometime in '60, as your pistol would cooreborate. The letter from colt on mine says that it was ordered with target stocks and target hammer but makes no mention of whether they were full checkered or not
 

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Thanks for the prompt responses but I just found the answer in the 1960 Gun Digest. The .357 Model pictured had the full target grips but the caption beside the photo gave a price of $75.00 and beneath that it said it was available with wide target hammer and target stocks for $84.95.
 

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I believe you will find examples with narrow hammer and service stocks as well as models with wide target hammer and target grips. The same seems to apply to Troopers of the same era.

I tend to gravitate towards the the guns fitted with the target options and I like to take these guns to the range as much as anything else in the safe!
 

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As stated, service stocks and service hammer were standard on the "357" and Trooper. Target stocks and target hammer were optional at extra cost on the "357" and Trooper.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A1A, Thanks for the PM with links to previous threads. They were indeed interesting. It is for certain that the revolver I bought could have the original stocks. I am convinced that the ones on the pistol are original to the gun. When I bough the .357 yesterday I did so with the assumption that the service stocks were replacements. My first thought was to find some of the target stocks, probably a difficult and expensive thing to accomplish. I am happy that will not be something I have to do. Thanks to all who have responded with prompt and useful information.
 

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There's one way to "possibly" determine what grips shipped on a Colt that offered the option of Target or Service grips.

Guns that shipped with Target grips had a flat head screw in the rear side plate hole.
Guns that shipped with Service grips had a rounded or dome head screw in the rear hole.

The flat screw was to allow the Target grips to fully seat flat against the frame.
This is not a guarantee, since it's easy to change side plate screws.

Colt usually installed Service grips and hammer or Target grips and hammer as a set, BUT..... on special order they'd install any combination a customer wanted, which is why you often see guns with Target grips but Service hammers.
 

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Colt Model 357

My 4" model 357 (1957) came with service stocks which I thought was sort of unusual. I believe they are original as they have the serial # written on the inside in pencil. It also has a round headed side plate screw. Curiously, it has a target hammer. I took the original stocks off and the gun now wears repro target stocks as I didn't want to risk putting any dings in the originals when I shoot.
 

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I just found 2 model 357’s today,One 6 “ one 4 “. Bothe close to new condition. Any idea of the value of these? 6” has box and paperwork. Also original reciept and military shipping order.
 

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Pics would help along with the year of production. The early guns tend to be more valuable.
 

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When I picked up my 1966 .357 Trooper a while back, it came with service stocks and service hammer.

I've forever destroyed its originality by swapping the domed screw that came on it for a flat screw (See? D was right about that. You should listen to him more often.) so I could put oversized Hogue wood on the gun, and having my gunsmith install a white outline rear sight blade in it. :)

Need to further butcher it with a red front sight insert.
After which I need to actually shoot the thing.
Denis
 

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Sounds kinda like me. Some years ago I sent my 6" Anaconda to Colt to receive their "ultimate" finish, polished trigger and ported barrel. It came back so pretty I've never been able to actually shoot it.
 

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This one's unfired, but no box or papers.
My gunsmith took it in from a retired HP trooper who'd had it since '66, but never shot it, and was letting some guns go.

I need to shoot it sometime before I die. :)
Denis
 
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