Colt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Colt 357 is the finest production handgun ever manufactured by Colt, and perhaps the finest production revolver ever manufactured in the world at any time by anybody. (No flaming, please, following this bold statement! It is just my personal opinion.)

The Colt 357, with a 4 inch barrel and the full checkered stocks with silver Colt medallions has become my favorite handgun. [Of course, all of my guns were lost in that terrible boating accident.] It is the most attractive, accurate, and well balanced of any handgun that I have ever handled. Colt's attention to details when constructing this gun is quite impressive. The bluing is magnificent, the weight and balance about perfect for a target revolver, the trigger pull is superb and the accuracy of the handgun far exceeds my abilities with it. The stocks are gorgeous, beautifully checkered and fitted to the revolver, fit my hands perfectly, allow excellent purchase on the handgun, and are arguably the finest production stocks ever manufactured. A Colt 357 is a bit too heavy for me to want to carry it for civilian self defense, and Crimson Trace does not manufacture a Lasergrip to fit the Colt 357. I see no reason why a LEO would not be proud to carry a Colt 357, and a few speed loaders, while feeling adequately well armed.

The Colt 357 is starting to be known as the Pre-Python. Maybe we should instead call the Python the successor to the Colt 357. Obviously, the famous, iconic, much-beloved and significantly overpriced (IMHO) Colt Python is also a magnificent revolver, considered the flagship of Colt's double action line. I am boycotting Pythons, as they are way overpriced and not as fine as Colt 357s. IMHO, the Colt 357 has every bit as great, or better, trigger pull, fit and finish, balance and accuracy as a fine example of the Python revolvers. I prefer the Colt 357 to the Python. I do not like the look or the additional unnecessary weight of the Python's rib on top of the barrel, or the Python's shrouded ejector housing under the barrel, and I do not like the over polished, melted look of some Pythons. The Colt 357 omits those heavy steel design elements, elements that do not contribute to better handgun performance, nor was the Colt 357 over polished to the extent that it looks refinished, even in its original condition.

I shoot the Colt 357 almost exclusively in double action, although I have shot it in single action as well. I shoot the Colt 357 in double action as accurately as I do in single action, out to about 50 feet. At 70 feet, the longest shot one can take at the range near my home, I shoot slightly better in single action than in double action. I need to keep practicing my double action shooting. Obviously, the targets shown depict some of my better shooting results; my lousy targets are discretely discarded at the range.

For many years, the Colt 357 has been underappreciated by Colt aficionados and, consequently, it has been underpriced. Now, many Colt enthusiasts are learning what a great gun this is, and as a consequence, prices of Colt 357s are rising rapidly. It would not surprise me if these guns eventually cost more than Colt Pythons, because Colt 357s are better guns than Colt Pythons, far fewer Colt 357s were manufactured than Colt Pythons, and because most Colt 357s are older than most Colt Pythons. LNIB Colt 357s, with box, papers, and Colt screwdriver, have recently been selling for as much as about $3,500. A high condition set of Colt full checkered stocks recently sold for $780 - just for the stocks! Soon, we will consider those high prices to be bargains!

I predict that the Colt Trooper 357 (NOT the Colt Trooper MK III in .357 magnum - that is a quite different gun) will soon be treasured equally as much as the Colt 357. That trend has already started. The Colt Trooper 357 is pretty much the same gun as the Colt 357, other than the roll marks on the barrel and the type of stocks used on the Colt Trooper 357.

I know we have had some recent threads about the Colt 357, but this thread has targets in addition to handguns.

Let's see those Colt 357s and Colt Trooper 357s!

Show off your shooting skills, and show us your targets, shot double action with Colt 357s and Colt Trooper 357s!



Gun Revolver Firearm Trigger Starting pistol Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Starting pistol Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Airsoft gun
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,768 Posts
Shooting sport Shooting Recreation Shooting range Sport venue Shooting sport Recreation Shooting range Circle Sport venue shot the gun for the first time today. target on left is at 50' slow fire (single action). target on right is from 30' double action. the 50' target was shot with 130g fmj. the target on right at 30' was shot with rem 158g lead. the action is slick in double action and the single action is lite. both loads are 38spl. the gun is all original and the grips are numbered to the gun. this is a keeper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
OK, here are four of mine..........the blue are both first year, 4-digit serial numbers, dual-tone blue.
The nickel pair are a 1958 six inch and a 1961 four inch. They are both refinished, I bought the 4"
as it is and had the 6" redone by Ford's. The 6" I found at a local gun show, lying on top of a pile
of rusty gun parts, I could barely tell it was a revolver. The nickel work by Ford's in phenomenal!!!
I really wish I had taken a photo before it was redone, you wouldn't believe it's the same gun.
You may notice the hammers on the nickel pair look ever so slightly larger than the blue 3-5-7.
That's because I was lucky enough to find a seller with two, bright stainless Python hammers;
they fit and work perfectly!

[Click each thumbnail for a larger image]

Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Starting pistol

Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Starting pistol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Another photo of my: 1961 chrome Trooper / / 1954 blue 6" 3-5-7 / / 1958 nickel 6" 3-5-7



The Trooper was refinished in bright hard chrome by APW Cogan, the Blue 357 is original two tone, the Nickel 357 was refinished by Ford's Guns.
Both refinishing jobs are literally flawless; great work. I had another revolver refinished in bright nickel by Colt's, perfect as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The days of getting your Colt double action revolvers refinished by Colt are over. What a shame!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,206 Posts
Orange Metal Rust Camouflage Here is my Colt .357 doing what it does best, clanging steel at 100 yards. A 38 Plus P works fine for this going out at 900 FPS. I cover the target with the front sight and can still see some orange on the side and just a smidge on the top. Squeeze....Bang and ting! So satisfying. My 1100 FPS lead .357 loads work fine as well and I can aim in the middle of the target for the same effect.

I believe this is my 5th and final Colt .357 revolver. I have owned both the 4 and 6" versions. The only reason I sold the others was getting another shooter hooked on Colts for 1/2 to 1/3 of a Python price. Now of course .357 models are noticed and are not $3-400 dollar guns anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,158 Posts
Nice, we have one at the range where I shoot. I love shooting that old Colt, I'll shoot some targets soon and post 'em here.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top