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Discussion Starter #1
I have a NOS Baby Dragoon 2nd Generation that has a stuck barrel from old grease. I have tried various solvents, 12" screwdriver level and tapping. All to no avail. I have not tried heat. Anyone have suggestions to get the revolver barrel off?
 

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I don't know what solvents you have tried, but I would try to soak it very well in whatever you have tried before. Then I would put the pistol at half-cock and drop the load-lever, and tap it hard with a wood block. It should come loose. I cannot imagine why it would not let loose.

Your call.

Jim
 

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I don't know what solvents you have tried, but I would try to soak it very well in whatever you have tried before. Then I would put the pistol at half-cock and drop the load-lever, and tap it hard with a wood block. It should come loose. I cannot imagine why it would not let loose.

Your call.

Jim
2nd Generation Baby Dragoon does not have a loading lever. The hair dryer method sound appropriate. First, make sure the wedge is all the way out/off.
 

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Make sure the wedge is out far enough, put the revolver on half cock so that a chamber wall is in alignment with the bore, stick a wooden dowel down the bore so that it rests on the chamber wall, tap the dowel with a mallet. Make sure to do this over something soft.

This worked for me with a Uberti Walker and the reason it was stuck was because the arbor was too fat.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
High and Tight, here, no hairdryer in the house. Might try the heat gun at distance. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Progress Report: Tried Break Free CLP, WD-40, and Hoppes 9 Lubricating Oil. Today I ran it through my sonic cleaner with solution. Then I tried the wood dowel mallet method three times. No joy. I think I will try Evapo Rust. i have enough to submerge it. After that I will get out the heat gun and stand back a ways.
 

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I'm a retired gunsmith. I had an original 1851 come into the shop a couple years ago in the same condition. I put in my padded vice about 3" from the muzzle, with the barrel pointing down(see pic). I heated it up where the arbor goes into the barrel assembly with the heat gun set on low. When the metal got hot I sprayed Deep Creep on the arbor where it goes into the barrel assembly and continued with the heat. The heat will suck the oil into the barrel assembly/arbor hole. I then turned it upside down and chucked it in the vice with the trigger guard out(see pic), and while still applying heat to the area, I gently tapped the trigger guard until it broke loose. I had to repeat the process to get the cylinder loose and off the arbor.

DSCN3464.JPG DSCN3465.JPG
 

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NO EVAPO RUST!!! It will totally remove the bluing!!! It does take awhile so I sincerely hope you read this in time.
And make sure to remove all the WD 40
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No Evaporust. Yet.

NO EVAPO RUST!!! It will totally remove the bluing!!! It does take awhile so I sincerely hope you read this in time.
I was concerned about the bluing even though Evapo Rust says it is safe. I used it on a terribly corroded Dutch Mannlicher I have, but I was going to reblue it, anyway.

Meanwhile, I am going to try the heat gun. And I have seen some suggestions for alternative solvents.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm a retired gunsmith. I had an original 1851 come into the shop a couple years ago in the same condition. I put in my padded vice about 3" from the muzzle, with the barrel pointing down(see pic). I heated it up where the arbor goes into the barrel assembly with the heat gun set on low. When the metal got hot I sprayed Deep Creep on the arbor where it goes into the barrel assembly and continued with the heat. The heat will suck the oil into the barrel assembly/arbor hole. I then turned it upside down and chucked it in the vice with the trigger guard out(see pic), and while still applying heat to the area, I gently tapped the trigger guard until it broke loose. I had to repeat the process to get the cylinder loose and off the arbor.

View attachment 218273 View attachment 218281
Will get Deep Creep and hit the heat gun. Thank you, Sir!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Success!!! Deep Creep and low power heat gun finally did the trick. I heated and Deep Creeped several times, used a wood dowel and gave some healthy slugs with my rubber mallet. I thought it had to let go, sometime, and it did. All is well. One of the thoughts I had was how I am not overly fond of people who buy a firearm, put it in a safe untouched for 30-100 years and then someone sells it to people like me who want to use it. My profound thanks to BisleySteve for his expert advice.

I still have a Colt 1860 fluted Army, 2nd Gen, that was also NIB that after a couple of cocks locks. Inspection showed the bolt and arm were both chewed up. I finally discovered that when the wedge is fully in it jams the barrel to the cylinder and back to the frame. It seems to me that the factory tolerances were too tight. What say you experts as to how to make it functional?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I was successful using your Deep Creep/heat gun method, Thank you very much. What I learned on close examination after the parts were separated is that there is a diagonal tool mark on the bottom of the base pin about 1/4 inch long and deep enough it raised shoulders above the base pin. It effectively stuck the barrel tight. There was no rust on the base pin. The base pin had a partial serial number that is covered by the barrel. The tool mark was under the case hardening making it a factory error. There appeared to be either dried grease or a small amount of rust on the frame to barrel pins. There was no grease or oil under the cylinder on the base pin. The Baby Dragoon has no grease grooves on the base pin. As an aside, the backstrap and trigger guard are not brass colored. They appear to be silver/nickel coated and have the number 804 on them, if that means anything to anyone. I know I am simple minded, but I think these variations are fascinating. Thanks, again.
 

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Success!!! Deep Creep and low power heat gun finally did the trick. I heated and Deep Creeped several times, used a wood dowel and gave some healthy slugs with my rubber mallet. I thought it had to let go, sometime, and it did. All is well. One of the thoughts I had was how I am not overly fond of people who buy a firearm, put it in a safe untouched for 30-100 years and then someone sells it to people like me who want to use it. My profound thanks to BisleySteve for his expert advice.

I still have a Colt 1860 fluted Army, 2nd Gen, that was also NIB that after a couple of cocks locks. Inspection showed the bolt and arm were both chewed up. I finally discovered that when the wedge is fully in it jams the barrel to the cylinder and back to the frame. It seems to me that the factory tolerances were too tight. What say you experts as to how to make it functional?
Check the wedge to slot first. With the wedge out look thru the slot, with the barrel attached properly to the frame, and see if the arbor slot is lining up to the barrel slot. If not, you will usually see the barrel slot is further out than the arbor slot even though the barrel is up tight against the frame. If this is the case, gently file the 'muzzle' side of the wedge off a little at a time. Check the fit often by re-assembling the gun and seeing if the cylinder is still binding. Just gently file it until it's been narrowed enough that the cylinder no longer binds.-Steve
 
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I was successful using your Deep Creep/heat gun method, Thank you very much. What I learned on close examination after the parts were separated is that there is a diagonal tool mark on the bottom of the base pin about 1/4 inch long and deep enough it raised shoulders above the base pin. It effectively stuck the barrel tight. There was no rust on the base pin. The base pin had a partial serial number that is covered by the barrel. The tool mark was under the case hardening making it a factory error. There appeared to be either dried grease or a small amount of rust on the frame to barrel pins. There was no grease or oil under the cylinder on the base pin. The Baby Dragoon has no grease grooves on the base pin. As an aside, the backstrap and trigger guard are not brass colored. They appear to be silver/nickel coated and have the number 804 on them, if that means anything to anyone. I know I am simple minded, but I think these variations are fascinating. Thanks, again.
Silver plate on the back strap and trigger guard are standard according to the Russell book. My Baby Dragoon conforms to this and also has no grease grooves, so I'm assuming that is normal also. The number you see on the back strap and trigger guard are assembly numbers. If you look in slot of the wooden grip that the trigger guard fits in you should see the same 3 digit number penciled into the wood. On the opposite slotted area of the grip that the back strap fits in, you should see the full serial number of the gun penciled in. This is how they matched all the parts to the correct gun between fittings and/or plating.

Cheers
 
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