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I see a lot of people buying Colt boxes for theirc gun collections. My question is does a box really help increase the value of your gun even though the serial number will be wrong on it, and you can never lay claim to the fact that it came with your gun. Just curious what people think here.
Picking up my 6" Royal Blue next month and I can't wait.
Thanks again.
 

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Well I do buy boxes sometimes (not much anymore), when I can find them reasonable but most of the time I keep them. They are lying on my shelf lol. I have put a couple guns in a same model same period box but advertised as not correct/not numbered to that gun. Most of the time, the gun will bring a little more but not much more, probably about what the box is worth by itself lol. To me basically if it doesn't have THE ORIGINAL Box then it doesn't have a/the box. I think there are some collectors which as long as they have an original box, they don't care if its the original, however they are definitely in the minority of the "Box/Condition Collectors". JMHO.
Also there are some who buy boxes (original or fake) to fake/mislead the buyer as its original which will bring alot more money if the buyers does not catch/know it,especially on the higher value guns like a Python. I know of people who do it and I don't like it at all. Actually I have a gun from a guy right now which came from a local well known dealer whom does it sometimes. This guy bought the gun as an Original "NIB" Colt which it is not correct.
 

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The lack of a serial number on the medium brown leatherette hinged-lid boxes allows one to indulge in the fantasy that a particular box that matches the model of a particular gun is original to that gun. We all know of the rare reports of a box being bought off of one of the auction site that matches the buyer's gun. It is rare, but it happens.

I recently saw an auction with one of these boxes complete with all box contents, which included the serial-numbered target. It was clear to me that the serial number on the target had been crudely altered to match the gun.

Pre-War boxes with pencil serial numbers are particularly susceptible to having their serial numbers erased and a new number matching a gun being written on the box instead. That makes Pre-War pencil-marked boxes worth more than the ones with grease pencil numbers, which cannot be altered.

I would rather have a non-matching serial number box than no box at all. To me, the box adds value, but not much more than the value of the box itself.
 

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Back in my days as a Class 3 Dealer my rule of thumb was the original box for a modern newish gun still available at wholesaler weapon added $20 to resell price. Can't say about old guns but if a box is included it's easier to sell at least. Can make the difference if someone looking at your gun and others of same model, etc. A matching box with all papers, etc. adds a lot of value. If serial number does not match weapon, I'd rather see it in an aftermarket presentation case. I did that for my 1952 Woodsman Match Target since no hope of a matching serial number box. Bought a nice felt-lined English-style wooden box. Looks great!
 

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To me, a box helps with 'the presentation.' So they do help keep the price higher. Imagine two identical guns from the same year, at two different tables at a show. The price range for this model is 800-900 dollars. The one with the box may sell for 900, both the buyer and seller holding onto the higher value.

Now, if you mean for investment, I would say if your gun is coming without the box, don't bother. Unless you intend to resell it right away. If you intend to keep it and shoot it for 10 or so years, who knows what the box market will be like? Will the originals be more valuable? Will there be more fakes, so the originals are less valuable? Etc. I would say buy a cheap box if you like to 'present' your gun that way, but don't invest a lot in one. It will never be the original box, so why pay more than $50 bucks for one?
 

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The rule of thumb that I use is that a correct, matching box adds 15-20% to the gun value. For instance, an early 2nd Gen SAA that is worth
$2500 would add $400-500 for matching, correct black box. A later 2nd Gen worth $1500, the box would add $250-300. Of course, the condition of the box matters.
I just picked up a 2-1/2" Blue Python in about 97% condition in the correct two-piece box. I valued the gun at $2200 and the box at $400.

Each person has their own model for valuing boxes.
 

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To me the box and manual are pretty important for the intent of the purchase is for collecting
If it's a shooter I don't think it's a big deal if the gun isn't boxed

Last saturday I bought a Python and when I got home I realized the the manual and box weren't correct.... I'm trying to "fix" this problem out the the gun shop

if anyone has some photos of a box and manual for a Python in the V902xyz range it would be great for me
 

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I did that for my 1952 Woodsman Match Target since no hope of a matching serial number box.
Since a 1952 Match Target box does not have a serial number on it, NO 1952 Match Target will EVER have a matching serial number box. (The serial number was written on a separate sleeve, which is almost never with a given box.) I have a correct, slightly rough box for your Match Target if you want to put a correct box with it.
 
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