Colt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Are they any good? I saw one today in the gunshop probably unfired for $225. I'd really rather have a steel frame and a DS. But I'd hate to let something good slip away.

J Dzurinda
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
794 Posts
joed, the price you listed makes for an attractive purchase, especially if unfired! Was this the older unshrouded version or the newer shrouded type?

Either way it's still a darn good price for a high condition gun. I also prefer a steel frame gun. However, there is nothing wrong with a Cobra & I do own several alloy frame guns including a Cobra. I do not run any hot handloads through the Cobra or any of the lightweight guns as this will accelerate wear & decrease service life.

To net it out, if I found the gun you described here in my neighborhood, I'd buy it in a minute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It doesn't have the shroud. Looks nice but when I picked it up I couldn't believe how light it was. That has got to be brutal even with a 38 spl. I take it that it is more of a carry gun then something to shoot.

I'm just not nuts about light weight guns.


Joed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I carried one for fifteen years and qualified with it at every shoot. Recoil is not that bad. It got out of time & nobody in town would touch it. Colt was going through some very bad times, so I used it as a trade for something else. Yes, I told the buyer that it was out of time, but he still wanted it.

For recoil, ask me about the "beast": a S&W 340SC, 12 oz,

John

[This message has been edited by JCM298A (edited 11-10-2003).]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,469 Posts
joed, if you do not want the Cobra, how about letting me have it? Any Cobra is worth that, and, should it be an old full-frame model, is worth a lot more. I will take it if you do not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JudgeColt:
joed, if you do not want the Cobra, how about letting me have it? Any Cobra is worth that, and, should it be an old full-frame model, is worth a lot more. I will take it if you do not. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I can tell you where it is if you're interested. Myself I want a DS as my next Colt. I don't know what you mean by full frame model though. It doesn't have a barrel shroud so I really couldn't tell you how old it is.

If you're interested I can put you in touch with the place selling it. Really nice gun, actually looks like it has never been fired. I just don't like alloy frame guns.

Joed



[This message has been edited by joed (edited 11-10-2003).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
I'm a Cobra fan, too, Joed. I bought one new in about '72 and carried it for my, "off-duty," weapon. I was always amazed how well it shot. I never did use it for serious qualification but I have no doubt it would not fail any reasonable expectation. Sadly, I traded it off for a .45 auto after I got scared -by Guns and Ammo Writers - about alloy frame guns. "dfarriswheel," an all-too-infrequent visitor to these pages wrote that from the 30's to the 60's, the DS and Cobra were about as defining as a badge. They're, "cop guns." But that's before the onslaught of these Siberian sissy-pistols, as I call them, for cop guns. (Now, THAT'S just gotta' tee someone off! Uh-oh!) The price for yours, based from this part of the worlds' prices, is mighty cheap! Grab it and enjoy. As long as you're not after Kodial bears or a massed Bansai attack, I think you'll be OK!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rcwambold:
I'm a Cobra fan, too, Joed. I bought one new in about '72 and carried it for my, "off-duty," weapon. I was always amazed how well it shot.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sadly it got away, someone bought it yesterday. I guess it's the one I missed out on. This one was a gem, had the full frame with wooden grips and it was unfired.

Can these guns fire a full 38 spl load? I wouldn't want to put a +P through it but can it fire a full 38 spl load or does it have to be reduced?

Joed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Fate?? I just got a phone call from the store owner, the person that bought the gun yesterday didn't pass the back ground check and it was available again. I told him to set it aside and I would be in for it today.

Looks like I now own a Cobra, luckily the store owner takes care of his good customers.

Joed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
794 Posts
Joed, you are very lucky. As you can see from all the responses, that is a great price for what you described. Do NOT run +P through it. It was designed to handle factory 38 Special. If you handload you can develop a reduced load in the 650 to 700 fps range to give you some piece of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by WS23:
If you handload you can develop a reduced load in the 650 to 700 fps range to give you some piece of mind. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I do reload, that's why I was wondering how powerful a load the gun could handle without disintegrating.

And I have just returned from picking up the gun. Really does look unfired.

Joed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
I picked up a used Cobra made in '73. It has the Pachmeyer type grips with the gold Colt medallion inset in them. Finish is 95% or better, mostly holster wear. At $125.00, felt I got an extremely good deal.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,893 Posts
joed:

The +P "sea Change" took place in 1972 with the introduction of the shrouded barrel model Colt "D" frame guns.

The post-72 aluminum Colt's were factory rated for up to 1500 rounds of +P ammo, then needed to be returned to the factory for inspection, and probable frame replacement.
The steel guns were rated for 3000 rounds of +P.

The older pre-1972 guns, SHOULD NOT be fired with any appreciable amount of +P ammo. They were not built to handle the stress of the hotter loads.

The aluminum Colt "D"'s were "carry much, shoot little" guns.

To be fair, many shooters practiced with standard .38 Special ammo, and carried the guns with +P level ammo for "business".

Since Colt no longer has any replacement frames, I suggest sticking with standard pressure loads.
I'd pick a good defense load in the standard area, and stick with that. Shooting hot loads will accelerate wear of the aluminum frame.

A load that would work well for defense is a standard pressure load using a 158 grain, lead, semi-wadcutter, hollow point bullet.
This is basically a non-+P version of the FBI/Chicago/St Louis/LAPD load that ended the police complaints about .38 failures-to-stop.
For practice, a good cheap bullet that is easy on the aluminum "D" is the 158 grain cast lead.

If you intend to shoot lead bullets, buy a Lewis Lead Remover kit. This safely and quickly removes lead from the bore, forcing cone, and cylinder, without risking damage like other methods do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I've had someone tell me mine was made in 1957. I figured it wouldn't take much to kill it, so plan on using 158 lead SWC's if I shoot it at all. Right now it's unfired and I may never fire it, but only use it for carry.

Thought I'd load up some ammo for it in the event I decide to shoot it. I'm thinking the lead 158 SWC by Speer at about 700 fps.

Joed
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top