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Discussion Starter #1
I bought one of these when they first came out and admittedly it was a good shooter. That said it looked like crap compared to a SAA finish wise. Over time the Cowboy was a failure with weak sales but now watching various auctions they are bringing prices like $1300/1400 for NIB examples. Now I wish I would have bought one in each barrel length. What do you guys think of the Cowboys as potential collector items with the prices they are bringing. A friend of mine has a NIB 4 3/4" Cowboy he offered to sell me and I'm thinking about buying it and just tucking it away.
 

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The Cowboy has become a collectible piece because collectors and/or investors think it's worth the investment. As far as a shooter goes...they're fine...the problem is that they're simply not an SAA in construction, finish, etc. For its original MSRP and purpose the Cowboy fulfilled what was intended but the market decided otherwise. I think it deserved a better fate but Colt rarely has stuck with a product that didn't sell well immediately. Maybe it should be resurrected and be better finished at a price competitive to the Italian copies and it could find a better market...but I doubt if the millennial crowd will be interested...it's not made of plastic and have tacticool accessories hanging of it. It's a design for traditionalists and that seems to be a declining breed.

I had both a 5 1/2" and a 7 1/2" Cowboy...still have the 7 1/2" NIB. It amazes me some of the dollars they're bringing in but the market doesn't have to make sense. When my wife and I begin down-sizing in earnest within the next two years mine will go on the market but for now I'm hanging on to it...unless the market value gets too high to resist.

But as a true collector's piece...I think values are overblown but those who can't find or won't pay the price for a SAA will buy the Cowboy because it says "Colt" on it. If they set the price that high I can't hold it against someone for selling one at that price.
 

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I think now is the time to sell a Colt Cowboy if you can get anywhere near the dollars mentioned above. I think that they may fill a niche for a collector who has everything else and just has to have one, or two, or more to fill a collection. If you can buy one at a favorable price (to you), go ahead. But I personally don't see them gaining in value over the current quoted market in your first post. I think quality always sells, but don't think the Cowboy is perceived as a quality Colt product. I could not bring myself to buy them when they first came out, and have looked at a few NIB examples in the past few years. I still can't pull the spend trigger on one. I choose to spend my money on something else. Not trying to be argumentative, just my personal view of the situation. Good luck to you sir.
 

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I'm on the other side the fence with my Cowboy. I have a 5 1/2" I bought new for around $450. It was all I could scratch together and legitimately justify spending at the time and to me, at the time, it was a real Colt. I know the purists say it's not a real SAA. Guess what? You're right. It's not. It's a Colt Cowboy. Mine shoots good, has killed a lot (at least in my imagination, dreams and while sitting around a camp fire talking shit...it's at least knocked over its fair share of beer cans), it shares a shelf in my safe with other "real" Colts... I have to admit, the prices they are getting now are way beyond what I thought they'd ever sell for..

Is mine for sale? Nope. If I had 3 or 4 of them, sure. I only have one. It's been with me a few years. It carries along a few memories. Unless someone offers me absolutely silly money, it'll be around for my daughter to do something with.

Now, is there anyone with silly money to tempt me? ;)
 

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I had one bought new when the price was almost as low as an Uberti, around $500. And at the time I think the fit & finish was better than the Italian clone. It was a good shooter. I sold it a few years ago for $800 or $900 and was happy as a clam. There is no way I would pay more than $500 today for a new one, not when I can get a nice Uberti for the same price. I think the people paying $1300 don't know the difference between a Colt Cowboy and a Colt SAA.
 

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Bought NIB. Might have to start considering moving it along if some feel the need to be
so very generous with their money. Awful lot of money for what it is.
View attachment 658151 View attachment 658155
If you are ever in the market to sell that cowboy I would be interested, Provided it is a 45LC 2002 production. I have a 2002 4.75 and a 2002 5.5, I want the 7.5 to round out the trio. Then I would have a set of colt single actions in all three barrel lenghts and matching calibers, to complement my SAA trio.
 

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As witnessed by the testimony in the previous post, there is a collector niche for the Colt Cowboy model. I have a few that added a few years back for the possible collector potential. I knew something was on the move recently. I stumbled across a Colt Cowboy in a gunbroker auction that was in strictly shooter condition. Many finish blemishes, and the bid prices was already over $1K with much time remaining to bid. That used to be the top shelf price for a NIB example just a few years ago. Prices may level off for a while, but I also think because of its limited production, it’s well secured to remain a Colt collector and will continue to slide upward in price. Commemoratives and/or the more artificial limited production runs of may only see spotty interest, but the Cowboy fits the bill as other regular production guns have ... the Viper, SF-VI, magnum carry, etc .. all production guns that really didn’t perform in the market at the time, but have that exact standard model low production criteria that us Colt collectors get the Colt collector bug to seek one for ourselves.
 

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If they want to revive the Cowboy idea, they should bring out a SAA with a lower quality polish/finish, but without the stupid transfer bar safety. But with current SAA pricing a 'budget model' is non existant.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Is any particular barrel length more desirable with these. I've never seen a 7 1/2" Cowboy, mostly the 5 1/2" examples. Does the barrel length affect the value at all?
 

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As witnessed by the testimony in the previous post, there is a collector niche for the Colt Cowboy model. I have a few that added a few years back for the possible collector potential. I knew something was on the move recently. I stumbled across a Colt Cowboy in a gunbroker auction that was in strictly shooter condition. Many finish blemishes, and the bid prices was already over $1K with much time remaining to bid. That used to be the top shelf price for a NIB example just a few years ago. Prices may level off for a while, but I also think because of its limited production, it’s well secured to remain a Colt collector and will continue to slide upward in price. Commemoratives and/or the more artificial limited production runs of may only see spotty interest, but the Cowboy fits the bill as other regular production guns have ... the Viper, SF-VI, magnum carry, etc .. all production guns that really didn’t perform in the market at the time, but have that exact standard model low production criteria that us Colt collectors get the Colt collector bug to seek one for ourselves.

In Ben's posting (above) he mentions the Colt Viper. I see these selling for about $2000 when NIB. To me that is a crazy price for a that model, but due to very limited production (just like with Colt Cowboy), Colt collectors keep running the price up on them. In collecting Colts,
always place bets on low production items.
 

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What about replacement parts? I almost bought a Colt Cowboy a year or two ago but then decided against it as I was told that I would never find a replacement bolt or hand etc. I guess I was looking at them just before the prices jumped up. I wanted one as a shooter. Of course I missed the boat as usual. They should call me "A dollar short or a day late Dave"..
 

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What were the biggest differences between a SAA & a Colt cowboy? I've never personally handled one, but understood it was Colts idea to compete with the Ruger shooter market.. was there internal differences vs a saa, spring changes, upgrades, etc??

Wouldn't mind reading it straight from the board here. Some of yous are pretty well versed in these things, and probably have better answers than other forums could come up with on the subject. Specifics about the Colt cowboy model has always intrigued me.
 

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What were the biggest differences between a SAA & a Colt cowboy? I've never personally handled one, but understood it was Colts idea to compete with the Ruger shooter market.. was there internal differences vs a saa, spring changes, upgrades, etc??

Wouldn't mind reading it straight from the board here. Some of yous are pretty well versed in these things, and probably have better answers than other forums could come up with on the subject. Specifics about the Colt cowboy model has always intrigued me.
Presence of a transfer bar is a major difference, the finish was plain jane.
 

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Here’s a little something that Dfaris wrote up some years ago. The Cowboy model has been the topic of discussion many times, and thusly makes it hard to find the hard facts within the pages of posts....

Hers some good stuff.

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The Colt Cowboy was an attempt by Colt to offer a lower cost single action revolver to people wanting a single action, but wouldn't spend the money for the high end and expensive semi-custom Single Action Army.
The Single Action Army was and is a Custom Shop model, the Cowboy was a standard production model.

It was a modern transfer bar safety-ignition type action. It was introduced in 1999, and discontinued in 2003.
Barrel lengths were 4 3/4" and 5 1/2".
Finish was blue with color case hardened frame.
Caliber was .45 Colt.
Grips were black composition similar to early SAA's from the 1870's.

There was a limited run of 1,000 guns with a bowie knife and a silver medallion, in a fitted case.

Originally, major parts were going to be made for Colt in the Czech Republic, but that was changed to Canada.
The guns were assembled and finished at Colt.

The gun was apparently not a success against the Ruger and various Uberti single actions.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, the Cowboy has chemical case hardened coloring rather than true color case hardening from the forging process.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, the Cowboy has chemical case hardened coloring rather than true color case hardening from the forging process.
That's my understanding as well. The photos I posted here in the thread are a bit dark but it's very easy to tell the difference between the coloring on a Cowboy and an SAA. Some nice blue colors, but I consider it splotchy.
 
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