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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
Just found my Grandfather's revolver in a shoebox in aunts basement. Looks to be in good condition considering. Just looking for information about the gun since I have very little knowledge. I've been told it is possibly a 1892 martial model of Colt New Army New Navy that has been altered.
What I know:
k 3446 stamped on frame.
Also found silver bullets labeled RP 38 SPL with the gun. Are these the correct bullets for the gun?
What is the value? My plans are to keep the gun for sentimental reasons. One of the grips has a chip. Are there replacements out there?
Thanks
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RP 38 SPL denotes Remington / Peters .38 Special cartridge. No front sight on barrel. Grips are some nicely aged ivory, you may be able to find some new / old replacements but you won't like the cost. Appears in decent shape except for the front sight issue. The real value is in the sentimental value.
 

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The gun has been refinished and I believe the barrel has been cut, that is why it has no front sight. The correct ammunition is 38 long Colt, which is harder to find and more expensive than common 38 special. Some have fired standard 38 special ammunition in these with no issues but it is loaded to higher pressure than 38 long colt. The best 38 special ammunition that works is 38 match hollowbase wadcutter ammunition, which is not loaded to as high of pressure than other 38 ammo. If the gun locks up correctly, it is probably save to shoot.

As stated, its value is best by what it means to you. The ivory stocks are worth more than the gun as they appear to be original colt.
 

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smkummer is correct. I am more cautious, though. Even lower pressure 38 Special loads like the wadcutter worry me in such an older Colt with a less robust frame and action designed before the 38 Special was introduced. I would stick with shooting only the cartridges this gun was originally designed for.
BTW: from what I read, 38 Long Colt commercially loaded ammunition is pretty expensive. Colt factory ivory stocks are quite rare. So are Colt factory pearl and stag stocks, but ivory is even more so; stag being the rarest.
As stated, the gun has been refinished, which affects value.

Nice gun. Welcome to the Colt Forum.
 

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The grips are worth having restored if its possible. I don't know if anyone restores ivory grips but as Malysh stated real Colt ivory grips are quite rare. I bet even in the damaged condition the grips are worth more than the gun. The gun alone is probaby worth only about $200-$250.
 

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Collect older handguns from Colt and S&W primarily
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Your revolver looks like it could have been military issue with what looks like an inspectors stamp on the frame above the left grip panel. Is there any other markings, like on the barrel beneath the ejector rod? If military, it would have had a 6" barrel and your gun's barrel has been cut off. If you want to shoot it, there are a few ammo companies like Black Hills and Ten-X that make .38 Long Colt cartridges for cowboy action shooting. I use them in my Model 1895 Colt civilian revolver. Looks like a great keepsake...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, there is a stamp above the left grip "RAC". I agree the barrel has been cut off for some reason. The only numbers are 3446 in 3 places. Two on the carrier arm and body and one on the carrier release. The barrel has "COLT. D.A. 38". I plan to keep it. I don't think I will attempt to fire it. I may look for a nice shooting revolver for that. I like the Colt Python (but not the high prices) I just picked up a pistol cleaning kit and a lockable case. Cleaned up really nice. Hard to get into the recessed areas of the medallions and screws. But I am new to this. First gun I ever cleaned.
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Since you did not mention markings on the butt, I assume there are none. The full serial number was located there, as well as U. S. Army stamps. Many of these old guns had their serial numbers removed when they were refinished at a later time. The other numbers you mentioned are assembly numbers, and they may be part of the serial number depending on which model it is.

Buck
 

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I agree. Gun started out as a New Army/New Navy US issue with a 6" barrel. The barrel has been shortened removing the front sight. Gun has been reblued. Stocks have been replaced with terrific ivory and they are repairable and worth the money to do so. Are the ponies on the medallions both facing forward? If so that makes them even better. Contact some of the ivory stock fitters about repair work. If I recall, the bore diameter on these early .38's was tighter than the later ones that were chambered for .38 spl. I personally would not want to shoot specials in it but find some .38 Colt ammo in cowboy loads. I think I bought a box at Cabelas a year or so ago. Get the stocks repaired, buy a few boxes of cowboy loads in .38 Long Colt then shoot and enjoy Grandpa's gun. Keep it clean and oiled and it will be a nice family keepsake. Do not use any abrasives or chemicals in cleaning it, just bore cleaner if needed and oil. Don't worry about cleaning the medallions in the grips; the aged look only enhances their beauty. Thanks for posting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sounds good to me. I would like to have the broken stock repaired if possible. And yes they are both facing forward. Do u have any suggestions on a reliable company? One other question is can the barrel be replaced or should I just leave as is.
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