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Discussion Starter #1
I picked this up Friday from a buddy. Hammer and trigger swing freely, bluing has been buffed off, cylinder won't swing out, ejector rod broken, and the only external markings are a faint horse on the sideplate, ".32 Colt" on the barrel (I assume .32 New Police), serial number 51447X (circa 1949, I believe) with a "V" below it, and under the left grip panel there is an "O" or "0" in the center with an "N" on the lower part of the frame. Can anyone tell me what the V, O/0, and N indicate, if anything? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'd like to fix all of the mechanical troubles, then I was thinking about reaming it to .32 H&R Magnum since it isn't going to affect any collector value. Top it off with a nickel finish to hide some of the pitting, then use it as a carry pistol to alternate with my 1st series Agent .38 I carry regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I like hard chrome a lot, but was just thinking the nickel would look a little more authentic to the period it was made. I can also probably nickel it myself, but am not set up to hard chrome. I did forget to mention one other step. I'd like to have the markings re-engraved on the sideplate and barrel, though I would mark the barrel to the new caliber and put under the grip "Custom by: " to avoid it ever being found with authentic looking markings in a caliber Colt never made it in and someone trying to pass it off as authentic.
 

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If the gun has no finish as found, then I assume someone polished the bare steel to the bright shine shown. Apparently, the gun has done fine as is, so why change that? A little Ezzox will maintain it fine without finish. Even if some surface rust does develop, so what? Just polish it off again.

The gun has no collector value, so just fix it mechanically and carry or shoot it as is. The money it would take to engrave markings and apply a finish would just be wasted.

It sounds like the mainspring may be broken. That could easily be observed by removing the stocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This is a project for fun and learning, rather than just a means to an end state of a functional carry pistol, which you have correctly stated how to achieve in the most practical manner. I'm working on a number of projects lately to test out restoration processes, so I want to see this through as if it were a customer's gun. A friend of a friend is an engraver and I'm sure wouldn't charge much to re-trace the horse and mark the barrel properly. My buddies, who have far more Colt expertise than I, are set up for hot bluing and nickeling, and wouldn't have a problem doing either for me, I'm sure, if I don't end up electroplating it myself. It's actually missing the mainspring, but the gunsmith a buddy took it to before I bought it from him said it needed a new trigger and/or hammer, but I haven't inspected them beyond a cursory look, though I see no issues so far with them.
 

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Sounds interesting - Please keep us posted on your progress. The internals of these can be pretty tricky.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've got a solution to the broken hammer/trigger and ejector rod, over-buffed sideplate, missing mainspring, and pitted cylinder. All for less than a new spring and trigger from Numrich.
 

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I hope you bought this parts kit. Could solve alot of the concerns. Also, any thought of a "real" project gun--a Fitz Special. Could be a neat project.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I did buy the kit. I'd like to get a hammer shroud before the Waller & Sons ones dry up. I'm just not comfortable carrying a Fitz Special, but I'll think about it.
 

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I did buy the kit. I'd like to get a hammer shroud before the Waller & Sons ones dry up. I'm just not comfortable carrying a Fitz Special, but I'll think about it.
Neither was Ed McGivern (fast and fancy revolver shot of the '20s and '30s). He thought an forward-extended trigger guard was a better idea.
 
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