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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Colt Detective Special on an auction site and when it arrived, as I always do; I checked the gun and found that the timing was off in double action, when pulled into single action fast, the cylinder failed to revolve. After taking it apart, I found that the hand had been filed too short (Top) and that the trigger pin was loose. I obtained replacement parts from Numrich Gun Parts and when they arrived set down to custom replace these parts. As all colts are made by hand, they have to be repaired with a temper as a watch repairman is since the parts have to be hand-fitted. Fortunately, I listened to many of you in this forum and got a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's book on The Colt Double Action Revolvers shop manual and discovered exactly what needed to be done to the new hand that I was replacing, and at which points the hand needed to be fitted. I replaced the trigger pin and finished the hand and when I tried it and followed the directions from the manual it works perfectly! I highly recommend to anyone who has decided to do gunsmithing on their own with a Colt Double Action revolver, to get a copy of that shop manual from Jerry Kuhnhausen...it is a life saver.

Al Marin
 

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Nice job. Did the seller ever mention that the gun was way out of time? Probably not. Glad you were able to rescue that one. They are fine little revolvers. Sure would like to see some photos of it.
 

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The truth is, despite the reputation of the old Colt's being "watchmakers guns" most anyone with good hand skills can repair much of the older Colt's problems.

The hold up is understanding what's wrong and what's needed to correct it.
The Kuhnhausen Shop manuals can teach you the what and how, but you still need to have the hand-eye skills and understand about paying attention.
It's the lack of paying attention that causes even professional gunsmiths to botch the job on Colt's.

I consider the Kuhnhausen Shop Manuals standard equipment for Colt owners even if you don't intend to work on them. Just knowing that there's a problem is a major aid to protecting a valuable Colt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
"Nice job. Did the seller ever mention that the gun was way out of time? Probably not. Glad you were able to rescue that one. They are fine little revolvers. Sure would like to see some photos of it."

No, but then I sort of expect that considering the value of colt revolvers; first thing I always do is diagnostics on the gun.

Detective Special.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
"The truth is, despite the reputation of the old Colt's being "watchmakers guns" most anyone with good hand skills can repair much of the older Colt's problems.

The hold up is understanding what's wrong and what's needed to correct it.
The Kuhnhausen Shop manuals can teach you the what and how, but you still need to have the hand-eye skills and understand about paying attention.
It's the lack of paying attention that causes even professional gunsmiths to botch the job on Colt's.

I consider the Kuhnhausen Shop Manuals standard equipment for Colt owners even if you don't intend to work on them. Just knowing that there's a problem is a major aid to protecting a valuable Colt."

I agree with you on the point of hand skills. Paying attention to all of the inner workings is very important to diagnose what is actually wrong with a Colt. Since the parts intermix (so to speak) with each other, one item functions a certain way, while another adds to the complete functioning; it is really important to understand how each part works to determine where the culprit is. As certain guns get older the parts become harder to find, so obtaining good resources are imperative in keeping a Colt working. It takes a great deal of patience to repair a Colt, but the outcome is rewarding.
 

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I absolutely love the V spring action, and wish I could work on them for a living.

Too bad I got into this hobby a little too late for that "path".

Amarin, if you ever need any more information for V springs, check out my Sticky threads in this section. I also have a pretty good collection of gunsmithing manuals/videos available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I absolutely love the V spring action, and wish I could work on them for a living.

Too bad I got into this hobby a little too late for that "path".

Amarin, if you ever need any more information for V springs, check out my Sticky threads in this section. I also have a pretty good collection of gunsmithing manuals/videos available.
You might not know it, but I have and watched them very closely - you are one of the members who do a lot to help and I appreciate it; Thanks! Al Marin
 
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