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Anyone here have a Colt Double Eagle in 45 (or 10 would do) I am probably picking up one tomorrow and there is really not too much on here about them. I searched and came up with a few threads but not many or any recent.

First off, I know it is not a 1911. I will be getting it for range, fun, and add to my collection. I kinda like unique guns and my trigger style of choice is DA/SA.

1) Am I correct that they will take standard 1911 mags?

2) Will most 1911 holsters fit? From what I have read they are wider, but how much? The trigger guard seems larger than a standard 1911

From what I can gather the Mark Is has some issues, but anything bad about the Mark IIs? Do most owners seem happen with function, accuracy and lifespan? __________________
 

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Picked up a full size, 1997, Double Eagle Mk II earlier this year to add to the collection. I absolutely love it. You're right, it's not a true "1911A1" but I'm glad I replaced my Sig P220 with it. Okay, I have Colt bias but it's a fine weapon. It uses standard mags but... interestingly enough, only Colt branded mags properly function the slide held open when empty. Aftermarket, even very good brands, simply don't. What's also very interesting is that it's our only 1911 my wife can cycle the slide on (we have a variety of others). Mine has the sand/dark earth colored VZ double diamond style grips that are beautiful against its stainless finish and make the pistol look even "cooler". From additional research prior to my purchase, the Mk II version is the better of the two. There's different sizes and calibers. It's fired flawlessly so far with 230gr ball.
 

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Just shot my 2 officers lightweight ( blue ) and 10 mm govt on Tuesday . Funny how it was said about slide remaining open after last shot. I tried out 2 unmarked stainless mags for the 10 one locked slide open after last shot . The other one didn't, I'm positive of this . .45 8 rd "shooting star mags "have kept slide open for last 10 years ( maybe I'm lucky ). Also , Kramers made me a double holster rig 10 years ago and an IWB ( both black leather ) . Quality , price and delivery time were all excellent . Fitment was /is PERFECT ,and I didn't even need to send a pistol to construct them ....... I highly recommend .
 

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Thanks guys, is that OD Viking a double action?
I once owned an ODI Viking and I now own a Colt Double Eagle. As far as I am concerned, they are identical in principle and operation. The ODI can be fired double action. I suspect Colt licensed the patents from the original owner or the required 17 year patent life expired before Colt started their production.
 

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The Double Eagle and the ODI with the Seecamp-licensed double-action mechanism are far different in design, so there are no patent license issues. In my opinion, Colt would have been better off to license the Seecamp mechanism since it is much simpler and no parts fall out if the stocks are removed as can happen with the Mark I.
 

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The Double Eagle and the ODI with the Seecamp-licensed double-action mechanism are far different in design, so there are no patent license issues. In my opinion, Colt would have been better off to license the Seecamp mechanism since it is much simpler and no parts fall out if the stocks are removed as can happen with the Mark I.
JudgeColt: Thanks for the comments and clarification on the ODI Viking versus the Colt Double Eagle. I never took either of the guns apart for examination, so your comments on this matter are illuminating.
I kept my ODI Viking for many years and really liked it, but since very few were made, there was practically no market for it once I decided to sell it. That is not the situation with most anything that Colt makes. There always seems to be a secondary market.
 

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I've owned double eagles since early nineties. I read whatever I can on them ....I once read that Colt gave a poor effort because they modified an action - when they should have started from scratch. If this is the case , I feel the ODI Viking is much worse for a production gun. It looks to me like some basement machinist/ gunsmith did the same thing only on a much greater scale. It looks to " ME" like o production firearm with an "extra " trigger in DA config. Still looks like there is a single action trigger present on firearm.Some machining , a trigger held on by a roll pin and yes some skilled work.Just looks like more work should've been done like - removing the "SA" trigger.Also the thread mentioned. Sig 220, I had one . " I " think it's the best in the world , and to compare a double eagle to this is unrealistic.Had to sell because of financial problems , but kept in family.Function is same with decocker - that doesn't look like one on the Viking.Lastly, the sig came apart easier than any SA or DA pistol I've ever field stripped. People say glocks are easy - but not like the sig. The desert eagle was the second easist in my opinion.Bottom Line - 3 Double Eagles for me , 0 sigsI miss mine , but I'm Colt to the Core 🔫🔫🔫
 

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I've owned double eagles since early nineties. I read whatever I can on them ....I once read that Colt gave a poor effort because they modified an action - when they should have started from scratch. If this is the case , I feel the ODI Viking is much worse for a production gun. It looks to me like some basement machinist/ gunsmith did the same thing only on a much greater scale. It looks to " ME" like o production firearm with an "extra " trigger in DA config. Still looks like there is a single action trigger present on firearm.Some machining , a trigger held on by a roll pin and yes some skilled work.Just looks like more work should've been done like - removing the "SA" trigger.Also the thread mentioned. Sig 220, I had one . " I " think it's the best in the world , and to compare a double eagle to this is unrealistic.Had to sell because of financial problems , but kept in family.Function is same with decocker - that doesn't look like one on the Viking.Lastly, the sig came apart easier than any SA or DA pistol I've ever field stripped. People say glocks are easy - but not like the sig. The desert eagle was the second easist in my opinion.Bottom Line - 3 Double Eagles for me , 0 sigsI miss mine , but I'm Colt to the Core 
ColtsDad: I like your comments about the Sig 220. I also own one. I own several of the WW-2 Sauer Model 38H automatics that seem to be the forerunner of many such decockable guns. I keep my Colt Double Eagle, but only rarely shoot it. Your comments about the ODI Viking are 'right on,' but when it first appeared on the market, it met a need that many people had. It was just too bulky as is the Double Eagle. I feel certain that if Colt had started 'from the ground up,' they could have come up with a better design.
 

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I had my P220 for about 10 years and its a nice gun. I sold it because I wanted to consolidate magazines. It was an accurate pistol and easy to take down but it didn't fit with my 1911's and it didn't say "Colt" on the side. Had no complaints about it. Even added a Millett adjustable rear sight and front sight, both with tritium inserts.
My 1911's all say "Colt" except for one that says "Remington Rand". I'll just have to live with that. :)
 

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The Colt DE Mark II was an excellent shooting pistol, but many Colt 1911 purists were put off by the looks. It just didn't look like a 1911. It seemed heavy, and bulky compared to a trim 1911. That being said, I've had an Officers DE and a Government DE (both Mark IIs.) They were good pistols for the money, unique and worked well compared to the ill fated Colt All American 2000. If you are going to buy a DE, the MK IIs are the only way to go. The prior models would pinch you finger against the frame and and were uncomfortable to shoot. Another issue was the non-DE MKII's, were not user friendly if you took the grips off. The Mark IIs corrected the non retained parts in the grip issue. Look at holsters made for Sig Sauer P220s and others for a good fit for your DE.
 

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I feel the ODI Viking is much worse for a production gun. It looks to me like some basement machinist/ gunsmith did the same thing only on a much greater scale. It looks to " ME" like o production firearm with an "extra " trigger in DA config. Still looks like there is a single action trigger present on firearm.
As I stated above, the ODI Viking is a licensed production version of the Seecamp Double Action Conversion of the Model O design, NOT a "clean sheet" design. In the early 1970s, Seecamp designed a CONVERSION that allowed a double action first shot out of the formerly single action Model O design. That was done by machining a channel on the right side of the pistol frame to allow a drawbar to run from the added pivoting trigger to a stud on the side of the hammer. The drawbar has a "hook" that catches the stud on the hammer and pulls on the stud to raise the hammer. When the hammer reaches a certain point, the drawbar slips off the stud and the hammer falls, firing the pistol.

The reason the original trigger is left is because the original fire control parts are still present, and need to be present to allow the pistol to function with the single action pull the pistol had before the conversion. The new pivoting trigger contacts the modified original trigger and continued pulling fires the gun. The trigger guard had to be enlarged to provide room for the pivoting trigger. Seecamp added the popular-in-the-1970s "hooked" trigger guard to all of its conversions, but ODI did not keep that design feature on its clone.

The Seecamp conversion is a simple, brilliant, patented design. I had a Combat Commander converted in the Mid-1970s and I still have it. I used to take it to gun shows and encouraged people to dry-fire it so that they would want to order a Seecamp conversion through me. It has literally been dry-fired tens of thousands of times. Even now when I pick it up, after checking the chamber, I pull the trigger a few times just to experience the wonderful, smooth pull. I believe there is a Seecamp-converted Colt up on GunBroker right now.

The ODI Viking is a bit crude, but I have always wished I had bought one to compliment my "real" Seecamp-Colt. Someday I might.

The SIG P220 (SIG is an acronym so all upper case letters should be used instead of "Sig") was one of the first .45ACP-chambered pistols to be offered with a double action mechanism. I actually believe that the design was FIRST sold by Browning as the BDA 45 before the design was finally marketed by SIG-Sauer as the P220. I believe SIG-Sauer sold the design chambered in 9mm before adding the .45ACP chambering. A few were chambered in .38 Super.

As an aside, my Browning BDA .45 is the hardest-kicking .45ACP pistol I have ever fired. I was therefore shocked when I fired a new P220 a decade or so ago and found the recoil to be "normal." In comparing the two pistols, the only difference I could seen was the twisted double-strand recoil spring in the P220. That has to be the reason the P220 does not kick any more than any other similar .45ACP pistol. Such a spring will not fit in the BDA (too "fat"), but I did buy a heavy Wolfe custom spring for the BDA and that tamed the recoil to about that of a P220.

During the 1970s, the Heckler & Koch P9S .45 and the Browning BDA .45 (and later the P220 .45) were the only double-action pistols chambered in .45ACP until the advent of the Seecamp conversion of the Model O Colt design. The conversion got a lot of press at the time. The success of all of those pistols FINALLY induced Colt to come up with a double-action mechanism for the Model O - FIFTEEN years later! One would think with FIFTEEN years to work on a double-action design and other successful designs from which to copy design features, that a better design than the Double Eagle would have resulted. No such luck.

Of course, Colt SHOULD have put the SSP design it submitted for the 1985 Service Pistol Trials into production and then enlarged it to handle the .45ACP cartridge, but instead Colt thought the Model 2000 All American was the way to go! :bang_wall: Oh, what could have been ...

Sorry about the thread drift, but the Seecamp is one of my favorites. Anyone with interest in the Seecamp conversions should go to the Seecamp website and read all about them.
 

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I kind of take offense of you calling out my post incorrectly , Judge. Specifically , because I was responding to saint Clair's post - not yours . So your as I stated , or whatever it was is is incorrect because your post hadn't even been written yet. As far as "sig " goes - yeah I know , I bought a brand new one and I believe it was all over the literature including the clear , plastic magazine wrap with black letters. Also was translated on my red , white and yellow circular sticker.It was a typo - just like my o model should of been "a " model . browning BDA , yeah - I know that. You seem VERY gun smart , I will admit smarter than me . I've actually been very impressed with more than one of your posts. I'm no lawyer , but if you are a judge- I would make valid points in your court. As far as SEECAMP goes, maybe YOU should have worked there........ Because I did . Off Woodmont Rd. in Milford , for Lueder, not Larry. Lets end this, have a good night . SINCERELY and GENUINELY - EdBlack
 

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ColtsDad, lighten up, Sir! If I misunderstood your difficult-for-me to understand post, I apologize. I have reread your post and cannot see that you are quoting anyone else. I do not see any quotation marks around any phrase or sentence in reference to the Seecamp conversion, or anything else for that matter. I do not find anything in saintclair's post that contains any semblance of what you claim to be quoted.

You are new here and maybe do not yet understand that what we do here is exchange information, each trying to contribute what we can and learning from the contributions of others. That process involves give and take. Do not be so quick to take offense when you think someone is challenging what you have posted. Respond to the challenge with a clear, concise and logical argument in support of your point. Just like if you are in court!

If you actually worked at Seecamp in the 1970s, you of all people should understand how the conversions work and how they were done. (What was your function at Seecamp, and why did you leave?) How would my working at Seecamp have changed anything that I have said? Please explain.
 
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