Colt Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,175 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
736 Posts
A nice looking 1st Model Dragoon! I like that "IXI" on the trigger

hello; that would be the first north carolina confederate infantry battle flag. 1st n c inf. was dominant in the army of northern virginia. like the dating of "artifacts" dug up at oak island, that flag could be engraved on the dragoon any time after april 1861, but not before.

regards, bro
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,175 Posts
The overlay that was posted brings it to life.
In your post #2. Yeah, I see that overlay now near the bottom of that string of pics. I have never seen that IXI on a civil war gun before, but then I don't specialize in CW.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Thanks so much for posting the link to that. I see those old guns, and wonder if my great-grandfather, James Snipes, might have carried something like that. He fought for the Confederacy after having enlisted in Lancaster County, South Carolina early in the war. He was wounded in a battle at Sullivan's Island during a battle with "Yankee ironclads", as described in the official Confederate Records. Well anyway, thanks again for posting this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
Interesting explanation, but I have never encountered someone claiming such a mark meant a Confederate flag. Strange, since this particular flag only became a popular symbol after the Civil War.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks so much for posting the link to that. I see those old guns, and wonder if my great-grandfather, James Snipes, might have carried something like that. He fought for the Confederacy after having enlisted in Lancaster County, South Carolina early in the war. He was wounded in a battle at Sullivan's Island during a battle with "Yankee ironclads", as described in the official Confederate Records. Well anyway, thanks again for posting this.
Glad you enjoyed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Interesting explanation, but I have never encountered someone claiming such a mark meant a Confederate flag. Strange, since this particular flag only became a popular symbol after the Civil War.
"The trigger guard wears a carving that I believe most will recognize and would never have been on a Union firearm." " I believe this ended up in the hands of Southern soldier at some point in the Civil War. No way to prove this, but highly likely." I'm not claiming , just my opinion as I state in the above quotes. The Dragoon is fully military marked and has the Dragoon rolled cylinder. This means it was issued to the 2nd Regiment Dragoons. The carving doesn't represent any kind of assembly or repair mark. From 1849 to 1861 this could have changed hands many times over, but we will never know. During the Civil War and before, arms were lost, captured or recovered from battle fields. The "Southern Cross" was widely used on flags during the entire war. I have no providence to prove that this particular Dragoon served on either side during the war, but as stated highly likely. Believe what you wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
"The trigger guard wears a carving that I believe most will recognize and would never have been on a Union firearm." " I believe this ended up in the hands of Southern soldier at some point in the Civil War. No way to prove this, but highly likely." I'm not claiming , just my opinion as I state in the above quotes. The Dragoon is fully military marked and has the Dragoon rolled cylinder. This means it was issued to the 2nd Regiment Dragoons. The carving doesn't represent any kind of assembly or repair mark. From 1849 to 1861 this could have changed hands many times over, but we will never know. During the Civil War and before, arms were lost, captured or recovered from battle fields. The "Southern Cross" was widely used on flags during the entire war. I have no providence to prove that this particular Dragoon served on either side during the war, but as stated highly likely. Believe what you wish.
Obviously you are vested in the theory that markings make it Confederate. Many marked their guns this way as they were illiterate and simply identifying their weapon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Gentlemen, This was posted only for your enjoyment of a surviving piece of early Colt History. I made no claim, nor to any provenance that this is a Confederate arm. This is only my own opinion as to it's possible History. Markings, at least mainly on long guns were usually initials. Therefore someone being uneducated as stated above, would not know one Roman numeral from another whereas their own initials probably. The only Roman numerals on the many that I have ever seen of early arms are marked on the inside surfaces to assist in matching hand fitted parts for assembly.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top