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I just picked up this little 22 from a gun show last weekend and it appeard to be in great shape. I finally got a chance to take it out shooting yesterday and I didn't think it was acting quite right. As I was shooting the rounds some seem to fire great and others appeared to almost fall out the end of the barrel with no power behind them whatsoever, they almost sounded like a dud. I was using Remington ammunition and I also had my 22 Sig I was firing the same rounds through and had no issues whatsoever. After I shot a few rounds it seemed to get harder to get they new rounds into the cylinder as well.

This is my first revolver so any help would be appreciated.
 

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I'll state the obvious and perhaps an obtuse question (forgive me) did you thouroughly clean the weapon prior to firing. Barrel, cylinder, cylinder bushing, etc? While not a gunsmith I have found that debris anywhere that involves the firing mechanism will cause burps. Others more knowledgeable will chime in.

Mtn
 

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If the priming charge is igniting, the priming charge is igniting. It doesn't matter what gun the ammunition is being fired from. The gun will not cause the main charge to falter as long as the priming charge is being ignited. If the bullets are dropping out of your barrel at all, the priming charge, at least, was ignited.

The only other explanation would be if the gases from the main charge were somehow being diverted or allowed to significantly expand within the gun somewhere to take the majority of energy away from pushing the bullet out the bore. I can't see that happening to this degree and would suspect the ammunition, not the gun. If you figure out otherwise, I'd really be interested in knowing what was happening. If I really though the gun was at fault, I would check the barrel to cylinder gap at each chamber, and for a bulged barrel and/or chambers at the least.
 

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I have a Great Western .22 LR caliber single action revolver that was doing about the same thing. Sometimes bullets were not getting to the back stop (50 yards) and I was getting a lot of unburned powder spitting out the barrel-cylinder gap. It was almost like a hang-fire and the report was soft. I looked at some of the fired cases and some looked normal but some had a very light firing pin hit. I talked with a friend who has a lot of experience fixing SA revolvers and he said that firing pin was probably too short. He made a new, over-length firing pin for me and I fitted it to the revolver. Problem solved. No more "semi-hang-fires" and the accuracy was a lot better, too!
Apparently, the light firing pin strikes caused the priming mix not to fire normally and it didn't ignite all the powder. This could be similar to the effect of very dirty chambers (mentioned in a previous post).
So, examine some of your fired cases and look for light firing pin strikes. Could be a FP with a broken end, too, I guess.
In the case of the Great Western revolver, the firing pin is retained in the frame by a stud with a slot in it. I ground out the center of an appropriately sized screwdriver and was able to turn out the stud, replace the pin and screw the stud back in. In the Frontier Scout, the firing pin is secured with a cross-pin. I've never tried to remove a firing pin from a Scout, so I don't know how hard it might be to do.
Good Luck,
Buckspen
 

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I have replaced/modified the firing pin on Frontier Scouts/New Frontier 22/Peacemaker 22. Short/broken firing pin was the cause for mis-fires in those cases, but the firing pin return spring may also be broken/damaged which would not push the firing pin back into battery. Push the exposed firing pin head with a finger to see if it travels freely and the spring remains under some compression. Look for firing pin hits on the back of the cylinder between the chambers. That's a sign of a gun that has been fanned. Fanning can damage several components including the firing pin. If you end up replacing the firing pin, replace the spring while you are at it. Beware of Numrich replacement firing pins requiring some fitting to get them to work reliably. (Voice of experience.)

Its possible to drive out the firing pin cross pin after soaking with penetrating oil, but one slip of the drift pin/punch and the shield or frame will be scratched (voice of experience again). Proceed with caution if you do it yourself.

I know your Sig is OK with Remington rimfire ammo, but it has a bad rep among target shooters for being unreliable and relatively dirty. Semi-autos are more fussy than SAAs regarding ammo, but I'd certainly try better ammo before taking out the firing pin!

Bill
 

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.22 rimfire cartridges are infamous for misfiring. All do it, even the most expensive target ammo will give you a misfire sooner or later. The problem lies in the way the priming compound is added to the case. The priming mix is added to the case as a liquid in a single drop to the center of the head of the case. The cases are spun to try to get the compound distributed evenly around the inside of the rim. Sometimes this works better than others. Misfires result when the firing pin hits a spot on the case rim that didn't get any priming compound. I think the cause of the "semi-hang-fire" is that the pin hits a spot on the case that has only a very little priming compound. This results in a weak primer flash and partial burning of the powder.

Back 30 years ago when I was shooting bulllseye pistol competition, Remington standard velocity ammo was considered very good. We burned up cases of the stuff. Then Remington made a change (don't know what) the the priming mix or the way it was put into the cases and ever since, it has had a very poor reputation. Personally, I like Federal target (711B I think is the product code) and CCI standard velocity.

The most reliable .22 rimfire ammo I ever used was some of the Federal match grade ammo with the dimple in the center of the case head. I suppose the dimple helped the priming compound disperse evenly around the head of the case, but whatever the reason, I have fired 5000 rounds of that stuff and never had a cartridge related misfire with it. It was expensive, but reliable. It hasn't been produced for several years but I bought 2500 rounds of it in an auction recently and I hope it is as good as the old stuff.

- - Buckspen
 
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