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Since the GCNM is already used, you won't hurt the value by shooting it. The pictures are terrible, but actually the pistol looks better than 85/90%.

Many more pistols are now being kept in the original box, and collector value won't be as dependent on it being a 99% in the box pistol as with the older pistols.
 

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The pre-70Series GCNM had quite a bit of metal taken out of the slide, primarily ahead of the locking lugs, and a smaller amount behind the breech face. In all I think it was about three ounces. This was done to make them reliable with the 185 gr. SWC ammo as it was designed and built primarily a target pistol. As far as I know the 70 Series GCNM slides did not have these lightening cuts.

Your 70 Series GCNM will work fine with a 16# recoil spring. Even with the 16# recoil spring mine doesn't hiccup with anything down to 185 grain lead SWC's, but all are fired from a locked wrist and elbow or two hand hold.
 

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Depends on what you want it for. Colt produced some beautifully finished pistols and revolvers between the wars, the likes of which we will never see again. You can find examples that would make good shooters, and you can find those that are too rare in model and condition to use as a shooter.

Shipped December 15, 1936.

 

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Sounds like a previous owner abused it. The 70 Series GCNM's had match barrels, and you can bet Colt never let one go out with a scarred up chamber. The 70 Series never had a tight slide to receiver fit, but the barrel to bushing and bushing to slide fit was always tight which contributes more to accuracy than any other single feature.
 

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Doesn't the buffer go between the recoil spring guide and the recoil spring? Strange location to prevent "battering". The genius of the buffer is that it costs a cent of less to manufacture and sells for a dollar.
 

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The recoil spring tunnel on the front of the slide contacts the spring guide at full recoil, the buffer prevents metal on metal contact and absorbs some of the shock.
This is where the brunt of the metal to metal contact is made, and the buffer does nothing for this. How is it that Colt and Kimber never saw the need for the Shok Bufs, and Colt invented the design?

 
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