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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a gun enthusiast with an ever growing diversified collection, I find it hard to beat colt both on the enthusiast and investment side. Of my colt vs non colt collection, the colt collection has and seems to be ever appreciating (fired and unfired), where as my non colt collection on average has not appreciated anywhere close. My father taught me to never sell, years later becoming that guy who used to have "Blank" model. He says u can always save more money to improve your collection. So when I was a little younger I took on a more quantiy rather than quality mentality. In retrospect I guess I should have done the latter. As I have learned more about investing, which I feel collection colts is a form of, I have been tinkering with the idea, of changing my portfolio around.

What are some of your opinions or experiences about dumping off some of the everyday items, in favor purchasing ie strengthening with colts?
 

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Bowhunter,
I recently re-evaluated my firearms purchasing habits. I, like you, enjoy my Colt collection (however small it may be at the moment) the most. I have made the decision to almost exclusively purchase Colts from now on. There are exceptions of course; a Henry Golden Boy Large Loop for example was a recent acquisition. I agree that Colt firearms are some of the most solidly appreciating firearms. Sometimes for not-so-good reasons; like discontinuation of some fine firearms!

I also have a bad feeling that Colt Manufacturing Company (firearms anyway) as we know it may not be around in a few decades or so, unless some major decision-making procedures are changed especially concerning the commercial market. Some may not agree with me and that is fine, but that is how I feel. I hope I am very, very wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its a tricky road to walk. Just for S and Giggles I took a couple of pieces (non colts) to a gun show a few weeks ago. I was shocked not by the amount of guys interested, but the amount of guys (mostly dealers), treating me like a crackhead looking to sell for a fraction in order to get a fix. Granted these aren't the best guns, but they were shot once a piece at the range. Very well cared for, wiped down and put in the safe for years. I was even compimented about the nice wood grips, how u dont see em like that anymore, and even the condition of the boxes. They compliment u then slam u when they insult u with a price. I know they (dealers) have to make money, but its very hard to sell my pieces to someone trying to low ball to make a buck.

I know how the show circuit works, but the same gun u sold them now becomes gold in their hands the week later.

Where are the interested private guys lol.

I realize that I havent made some of the smartest investment type purchases, and will probably loose money on some, but my god all of em.

I was so close on closing on a trade for a nib cobra, but I pulled the pin cause the guy was starting to piss me off with his arrogant attitude, and lies. Hey tried to give me the production date, and I knew better cause the box wasnt the correct era. He changed his tune when I pulled my date book out of my baggy short pocket. Some times being younger makes some of these guys think they can take advantage of you.

Eventually I will transition from quantity to quality, unfortunately I know realize it will take longer than I thought.
 

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Bowhunter; I feel your "frustration",but don't ever think for one moment a dealer is gonna offer you anywhere near "retail price" for a gun. Simple math will show this. Even if they make $100 per gun,and sell 5 a week,that is $26K a year, less expenses of doing business. Even if they sell,some ammo etc.,that ain't a good income! So,if you have a gun that usually sells for $300,don't even expect an offer of $200.

Dealers dream of the uniformed,naive,and totally ignorant person,who finds'inherits Uncle Fred's SAA Colt,brings it into the shp,and dealer gives them a smile,saying the gun is unsafe and $100. Don't laugh,it STILL occassionally happens!

No,I am not a dealer,nor even a "true collector",even though I have a "few" Colts and Smiths(with a side interest in Great Westerns),the great majority being pre 1960. I shoot my guns,work on them,and reload for them, My "estate" will reap "any profit" from my "investments",so I enjoy them while I am alive.

Even fine quality Colts etc. are NOT a liquid investment. If you need money quick,unless you have a nearby dealer,who "knows" your collection,and has a ready market for your guns,you have to take the best price,the vultures,


oops.dealers will offer you. Used to be that there were a couple of pawn shops,that gave the desparate sellers,so low a figure,they'd sell 'em cheap,including some nice pre wars that grace my collection,but you also have to watch out for stolen guns when dealing with pawn shops,unless you know the owner is fully honest,and checks with the police if the gun is "hot"

Selling to private parties is interesting....and can be risky. Yes,you can get 'the retail",but some people with criminal records,will buy this way to avoid the background check. With our society having too many lawyers(way too many!)a gun you sold,that is used in a crime,may get you sued by the victim's family. Plus,you "open your home" to strangers. I probably buy 1 gun every 2 years,or so from "private parties.

Yeah,focus in on one area,but don't be afraid to buy something you like to shoot,and it doesn't have to be just Registered Magnums as some S&W collectors do,or Pythons here.Thats a little too specialized,at least for me. I have been "seriously into guns for over 20 years now,and am fortunate in having a backyard range at my rural home.With only 50 yards,rifles are not a challenge to shoot,and I found it difficult to sneak them into the house,and hide them,from the wife!!! Even had a few Colt pre war semi auto pistols when I began buying again,but hard to chase brass,and "experiment" when I began to reload! So,these factors swayed me to "vintage" Colt/S&W revolvers.

Good Luck and ENJOY your Colts and other guns,because "the money" factor can cause unhappiness. But don't "overspend",set a "gun budget",like I have done,as I am far from a rich man,or else I wouldn't be working full time(and more!) at age 62!

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

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The gun show circuit can be most frustrating at times in terms of selling a gun for close to its value. As always, what ever you have is junk and whatever the dealers are selling is gold. I found that exact problem with a 6" Python which shocked me in terms of the willing price from a dealer. Some were nice in that they wanted to buy the gun, but told me that I might be insulted with their offer. In which case, I simply don't worry about it and move on. That said, you can do exactly the same thing to them. Their only advantage is having their wares displayed to more potential customers.

Unfortunately, I think a person is probably better off selling on-line with a substantial reserve or minimum bid that you are comfortable with. If it doesn't sell, you can always reduce the price.

I try to not sell anything, but when you look at your collection and there are pretty pricey things in it that you are not that interested in or that you feel the money is better invested in something else, I sell and try to not look back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lonewolf,

Trust me I understand the dealer mentality. I was just venting a little. Liquid assets are a totally different ballgame I agree. I have said it here and I'll say it again, that collections regardless of what it/they are, are unique. They are a hobby, but if u do it right, one can consider and manage it/them like an investment. I love it cause if I play my cards right I can have all the fun I want, and still walk away from it spending very little, if not making a little cash.

It seems like dealers have changed a bit over the last 5-10 years, maybe it was all the ban hype that did it. Regardless online seems like the way to do it, but I still like wheelin and dealin at shows, call me a little nostalgic lol.

I just have been thinking lately about shifting my money from multiple pieces that will appreciate very slowly if not depreciate, into fewer that will at the very least hold their value. Of course the sentimental ones I could never part with.
 

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Gun shows are a "meeting place" of all the segments. Most are there and in it to make the money, find a quick 'deal' or maybe even hit the jackpot. BUT there are also "collectors", some are out and open and most of the regulars 'know' them and then there are the 'closet' ,quiet, guys who just hang around.
The gun will "sell it self". If it is that rare and collectible, they will know, and just buy it, they will NOT let it walk away.
Then there are the "experts", walking around or standing at the door with a 'Blue Book' under their arm. /forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif
The 'cons' and the cheapskates, will make a piss poor attempt and only 'embarrass' themselves. You "smile and keep on walking". The serious person, reaches in and pays the money. I know , I see this every weekend for longer than I care to mention................/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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And then there is the collector who makes the rounds of all the good shows looking to add to his collection, and every once in a while, finds a really good bargain (on something he may already have) and jumps right on it, thinking "Ahah...I'll make a few bucks on this one to help support my habit!" ....Then, he carries it home, has second thoughts of "What the heck...it's not eating anything and it will only gain value", so into the safe it goes to never again see the light of day other than an occasional fondling and preservation check. Don't ask how I know, but there's at least one yahoo wandering around gun shows doing this and wondering if there are others who do the same.... /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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I would say there is more than one yahoo who does this, not that I have any special knowledge. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif I used to buy 38spl Diamondbacks to feed my 22 habit. Now, I want them all back.
 

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I have never bought a firearm from the perspective of an investor but rather from any of a hundred quirky reasons a collector has that causes a gun to be appealing. The downside for a collector when gun values appreciates is that by the time you decide you like something, it becomes to expensive. When I first started buying guns in the mid 1950's, I wouldn't think of purchasing a worn out old Colt percussion, junky old Henry Repeator....never said I had a brain.
 

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DP 6,
I agree. I have not been collecting as long as you have, but have been active for about 15 years. I remember passing up Winchester Model 1897's in riot length with police department provenance for $200-250 in the early 90's. Colt's, Winchesters and to a lesser extent S&W's seem to keep their value. Over the past two years, I have started to pick up 1960's NIB colts because they seemed very reasonable. 1970's NIB DS, Python's, and Diamondbacks are already up there in price. Colt Auto's seem to have provided some of the greatest return over the years (espeically 1911 and 1911A1's) althought I have kept every Colt Auto I have ever purchased. Although I collect for the history and craftsmanship, I have started to track my buy/sell prices over the years. Colt's always seem to stay on top, especially those in the 98%+ range. If you own the best condition of that model, you can often set your own price at a show. As for dealers at shows, I seem to gravitate to those who have similar items on their table. They understand and appreciate the same items as I do, and usually are collectors themselves. As for investement return, if I can break even or even make a few bucks over the years then cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
[ QUOTE ]
DP 6, As for investement return, if I can break even or even make a few bucks over the years then cool.

[/ QUOTE ]

I agree thats the benefit of collecting colts. If I wanted to make money at a hobby, it would be in the stock market. One good thing about colts is that they usually hold their value.

Just like putting your money in bonds or bond funds, chances are that your intial investment will always be there. Cant say that about my other hobbies.
 
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