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Roy Jinks owns the Smith & Wesson records, and has great personal knowledge of the guns about which he writes. He sets the price, which he chooses to keep inexpensive. When he passes the records on, the price will certainly be higher.

Much of what Roy provides in his letters to make them two pages long is just a summary of a particualr model, such as the .44 Magnum, where he describes the development and who got the first ones, etc.. The specific shipping information about a particular gun is just a few sentences at the end of the letter, which is about the same information as found in a Colt letter.

Colt letters used to be $10. I bought dozens at that price. If you think the letters are too high priced, do not buy them. While I would love to only pay $10 per letter, clearly the letters are worth a lot more. If you can authenticate a $7,500-$10,000 or more Colt revolver with a factory letter, how much is that worth? Colt gets $300 for the oldest letters for the most valuable guns. The cheapest letters are $75 for the "modern" guns.

I love to get the letters and find them worth the money. The Smith letters are a bargain just because Roy does not choose to charge what they are really worth.

[This message has been edited by JudgeColt (edited 07-31-2004).]
 

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I got my information directly from Roy Jinks at the 2004 SHOT Show, where he was visiting with showgoers and selling signed copies of his last book.

After thanking him for the wonderful service he performs for collectors, I inquired about the mechanics of factory letters and Roy volunteered that he owns the records. I did not challenge him by asking if he owns ALL the records. I did not take his statement to mean that he owns "modern" records, whatever that might be, but that point was not addresssed. (We can argue about what records those might be.)

I would speculate that when computer recordkeeping began, the physical keeping of records (ledgers, etc.) ended. I could imagine that Roy could have "saved" those manual records from destruction when they were thrown out, perhaps at one of the ownership changes such as Bangor Punta to Lear Sigler to Tompkins, etc., and now owns them as treasure trove or the like.

I did get the impression that Roy runs the historical department exactly as he wants. I am quite sure that he sets the price of the letters.

The checks for letters are made out to Smith & Wesson because Roy is an employee of Smith & Wesson and he writes the letters as part of his job for which he presumably is paid a salary, with perhaps a commission as well.

I am a Colt guy with an interest in Smith & Wessons as well, and I was just repeating what I was told by Roy Jinks himself. If he is at the 2005 SHOT Show, I will ask him for clarification.



[This message has been edited by JudgeColt (edited 07-31-2004).]
 

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Mr. Paine, come on! If you owned or were contemplating the purchase of a valuable Colt with odd features, having a factory letter confirming the odd features are original would be worth many times the cost of a letter. Verifying that the odd barrel length on a Model P is factory would add far more than $300 to the value of the gun. Because Colt knows that, the "value" of the letters sets their sale price.



[This message has been edited by JudgeColt (edited 08-02-2004).]
 

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Mr. Paine, I am glad to hear that you will not take advantage of a fellow fellow gun enthusiast. I take that to mean that you will not charge a fellow gun enthusiast market price for your best gun when you are selling it because, according to your logic, that would be taking advantage of a fellow gun enthusiast.

What a great guy you are! I am a fellow gun enthusiast. What do you have for sale? I am a little short right now, and can only afford to spend about ten percent of market for anything so it is nice to know there are people who will not take advantage of my economic situation.

Just kidding of course, with no offense intended. This issue is a little like seeing "wanted" advertisements seeking something, usually a scarce item, with the requirement that the price be "reasonable." What that usually means is that the seeker does not want to or cannot pay market price, which he or she thinks is "unreasonable." By definition, the market price is reasonable. To sell it for more or less is "unreasonable." By definition, the Colt letter market prices are reasonable, while, one could argue, the Smith & Wesson letter prices are unreasonable, since they are worth more than they cost.

You do not pay the stallion for how long it takes him. You pay him for knowing what to do and getting it done. When Colt knows what to do and how to get it done, that is what you pay for. I think I had better letter some more Smiths before their letter price is raised to its true value!
 

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I remember seeing some clocks like that when I was in the Army. As I recall, the hour hand makes one complete revolution in one day, while the minute hand makes one complete revolution in one hour. Now we have digital clocks that can show 24 or 12 hour cycles.
 

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This thread is taking an ususual turn from expensive letters to odd clocks!

At my age, I cannot remember what I had for breakfast, so, when I saw what I recognized as a 24-hour clock, I just made a comment about seeing them in the Army. I have not seen one since.

I did not analize the position of the numbers or the length of the hands. Now I realize the difference when it is mentioned. Do you know the answer to the riddle, or are you looking for the answer?

At the risk of looking stupid again (a common situation for me), I never felt I could glance at a 24-hour clock and know the time without thinking about it and reading the numbers. (In two years, I never thought about 24-hour time without "translating" into civilian AM and PM time.) If others have that same limitation, it would not make any difference where the numbers are.

Still, if someone offered a 12-hour clock with numbers located out of the traditional positions, I can understand the problem that would create in using it in the normal "glance" fashion. I prefer a watch with traditional hands over a digital for the reason that I do not have to "read" the numbers to get a feel for the time.

Knowing the nature of kwill1911's interests, I suspect there is more to this story. kwill1911, please tell us more.
 

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Bummer! If the clock is so early, perhaps the 24-hour convention had not been established, or the maker did not know about the convention.

I just realized that the lower half of the face has a dark portion, which often corresponds with the hours of darkness from 1800 to 0600 hours. Maybe that is part of the "glance" factor before the convention was established.
 
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