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This gun in the 132xxx range was basically acquired in a junk box, and needing repairs. At one point I was going to junk it out and sell the parts. Some of the repairs would not be easy. For example, someone had drilled out an upper backstrap screw, and didn't stop in time. That's right, the screw head goes all the way through now. The arbor column was loose as a goose. The grips, although probably original, were discolored and just looked bad. The grips look better now, but several problems remain.

The stamped name on the butt was noticed - "Ed Hogue". The thing that impressed me about this name is that the stamps must have been made by a local blacksmith. They are not the expected Roman letters with serifs, or what some now call plain Arial. In fact, they are crude. If someone was going to add a name "to improve interest and value", where would they get these stamps?

The serial number indicates 1863 production. Nothing much was found on any Ed Hogue in Civil War records. But I subscribe to True West, and in the Feb 2019 issue was the attached article, as excepted for brevity. One Ed Hogue arrested Ben Thompson in Ellsworth in Aug 1873. In June 1877 the Ellsworth Reporter announced that Ed O. Hogue, former Deputy Sheriff of this county, had died of fever while in Wyoming Territory.

I may add additional info as it is found in old newspapers, and elsewhere.
 

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I have been in your spot before, and I am rooting for you, but unfortunately, unless you are able to, at the very least, connect "your" Ed Hogue to an 1860 Colt Army (as in, it's know that he carried one), then this all is just conjecture.... I have just gone to Ancestry.com and put "Ed Hogue" into a search for the United States, and came up with more than 85,000 records... Regarding the stamping, I seriously doubt it was added to enhance value, and I would totally bet that's the name of the gun owner... Having said that, the stamping does sort of look more early 20th century font type to me, rather than 19th century. Would love to hear updates us as your search continues!


Screen Shot 2020-07-10 at 12.49.12 AM.png
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I have been in your spot before, and I am rooting for you, but unfortunately, unless you are able to, at the very least, connect "your" Ed Hogue to an 1860 Colt Army (as in, it's know that he carried one), then this all is just conjecture.... I have just gone to Ancestry.com and put "Ed Hogue" into a search for the United States, and came up with more than 85,000 records... Regarding the stamping, I seriously doubt it was added to enhance value, and I would totally bet that's the name of the gun owner... Having said that, the stamping does sort of look more early 20th century font type to me, rather than 19th century. Would love to hear updates us as your search continues!
I totally understand what you are saying. Sometimes I think I'm chasing A Rabbit that Can't Be Caught!! I do not expect total success, but have fun trying -- for a while at least.

Those hits on Ancestry can be filtered down using the age range of someone who could own this gun 1863 to about 1878. I went down that road when looking for a possible Civil War vet. This is what I had found:

Ed Hogue:

1860 Census – Edward S. Hogue (w37) “Farmer?” PauldingCo., Georgia.

E.S. Hogue, Confederate, Private Co K, Floyd Legion, Georgia (State Guards), no date given.

Edward Hogue Confederacy, Georgia.

Edward Hogue, enlisted as Corporal Company C, Georgia 26th Infantry Battalion.

Edward Hogue Confederate, Corporal, Co C, 26th Battalion, Georgia Infantry.

Additional in Fold3, 4 records: Enlisted Sept 10, 1863 at Corrollton, GA under Capt Nathaniel Estes, for 3 years or for the (duration of) war. Present Nov & Dec 1863. Still in Co. C 26th Battalion Jan & Feb 1864, but absent with leave, last paid Dec 1863. 1905 Pension (for widow in Cullman Co., AL) Pvt Co C, 26th GA. No records after?

1870 Census – Edward Hogue (w45)“Farmer” PauldingCo., Georgia.

Edward S Hogue, born 1825, died May 1895 in Cullman Co., Alabama.

PART OF MY RATIONALE HERE is that IF this was a Georgia Colt, then maybe there are other Georgia guns marked with these Same Unusual Stamps.
 

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Pictures of "Killer" Billy Thompson and his brother Ben. A drunken Bill Thompson killed Sheriff C. B. Whitney.

An 1877 photo of Ellsworth, Kansas.

Another photo of Ellsworth, Kansas with story about policeman Ed Crawford killing Billy's friend Cad Pierce, an act of revenge for Whitney's murder.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have been in your spot before, and I am rooting for you, but unfortunately, unless you are able to, at the very least, connect "your" Ed Hogue to an 1860 Colt Army (as in, it's know that he carried one), then this all is just conjecture.... I have just gone to Ancestry.com and put "Ed Hogue" into a search for the United States, and came up with more than 85,000 records... Regarding the stamping, I seriously doubt it was added to enhance value, and I would totally bet that's the name of the gun owner... Having said that, the stamping does sort of look more early 20th century font type to me, rather than 19th century. Would love to hear updates us as your search continues!
I have been finding quite a bit more on Ed Hogue in early Ellsworth Newspapers. But this gun has no known provenance to rely on, so it will remain speculative.

One thing that occurred to me is that the man gunned down by Bill Thompson was Sheriff C. B. Whitney. Somehow I think that in an Ellsworth Museum there is a Colt 1860 Army conversion and holster that was used by Whitney that day. But I haven't found that picture yet. I can see it in my memory, but where did I see that picture? True West mag, American Riflemen, CCA magazine?
 

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Provenance is such a rare fact to find in these wonderful old pieces of history, but when obtained it is such a sweet victory . For me personally , the real reward is sharing with others . That's why I keep logging into this forum , it's full of people like ME 🙂
 

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Victorio,
I think you have enough info. now to make it a very interesting Colt.... don't let other's here cause you to lose intrest in your gun with their neg. comment's, their's always a few out there.
 

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I would also suggest you log into some of the old newspaper websites (most are pay-to-play) and read anything you find about Ed Hogue). A lot of times the reporters of the age would describe the guns of folks they wrote about, etc., and if you get a hit, saying your Ed Hogue wore an 1860 Army then you are ahead of the game.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Provenance is such a rare fact to find in these wonderful old pieces of history, but when obtained it is such a sweet victory . For me personally , the real reward is sharing with others . That's why I keep logging into this forum , it's full of people like ME 🙂
I totally agree! The chase and purchase is a thrill. But after acquiring, the history found and sharing that with others, is a lasting satisfaction.
 

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The Jan 16, 1873 Ellsworth Reporter indicates that Ed Hogue was a Deputy Sheriff at that time.

This is the August 21, 1873 Ellsworth Reporter mentioned in True West Magazine. It gives some details of Billy Thompson killing Sheriff C. B. Whitney with a shotgun, Ben Thompson taking a rifle shot at Happy Jack, the hours afterward when armed Thompson supporters gathered in the street, the Mayor firing the police force for inaction, and Ed Hogue's action of disarming and arresting Billy Thompson.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The April 23, 1874 Ellsworth Reporter notes that E. O. Hogue is the Ellsworth Constable.

The Dec 16, 1875 Ellsworth Reporter shows that Ed O. Hogue as Sheriff, has presented a $7.60 in expenses to the County Commissioners.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Most of what has been found on Ed Hogue has been from period newspapers. Strangely, I have yet to find any of this family in Ellsworth County, Kansas by Census records until 1920, when his widow surfaces. I have even looked for surname misspellings. I have looked for his wife on a nationwide basis after Ed reportedly died in Wyoming 1877.
 

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"LOOK BILLY, MY GOD, YOU JUST SHOT OUR BEST FRIEND"!– Yelled Ben Thompson.

A more detailed account of the August 21, 1873 Ellsworth Shootout was found in the Kansas City Star -Sept 10,1963. Happy Jack was John "Happy Jack" Morco, who received fire from Ben Thompson's rifle. Billy Thompson was eventually arrested in Texas and brought to Ellsworth for trial, but was acquitted. Ed Hogue must have retained much anger after this episode. In a liquored-up state, Ed was beating up unarmed Texans. Ed Hogue was apparently fired.
 

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Also worth checking out, to see if Ed Hogue's progeny is around today, and whether there are any family stories around his guns, what did he carry, any documents, etc. You can do this by posting on Ancestry type websites, requesting any information, or seeing if Hogue's progeny had posted about their grandpappy.... I once did that about a non-gun type piece, and found that one of the family members had created a whole website about their ancestor, with stories about his service, escapades, court martial, etc. There were 500 pages to download about the guy. I just about flipped out with happiness to see all the material.
 

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Also worth checking out, to see if Ed Hogue's progeny is around today, and whether there are any family stories around his guns, what did he carry, any documents, etc. You can do this by posting on Ancestry type websites, requesting any information, or seeing if Hogue's progeny had posted about their grandpappy.... I once did that about a non-gun type piece, and found that one of the family members had created a whole website about their ancestor, with stories about his service, escapades, court martial, etc. There were 500 pages to download about the guy. I just about flipped out with happiness to see all the material.
Some great ideas, in general. I have looked for Ancestry family trees on both Ed Hogue and his wife Louise Jane, and little or nothing was found. These families are having the same difficulties that I was - in finding more than two Census years of info. I often send notes to these tree holders, telling them how to find missing Census years of info etc.
 

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I live not all that far from Ellsworth and have been in that museum. If that gun is in there, I didn't see it.
 

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Just stumbled on to this website and thought I should share a few things about "Ed Hogue." Having researched him for many years, I am now sitting on an 86-page unpublished biography. He was actually born Olivier Edouard Hougue - at sea - while his parents were immigrating across the Atlantic from the coast of Normandy, France. I have to mention the significance of his heritage over there, which he learned when a teenager, having gone back to France for a while till age 17. Then he returned to
One of the most important things about the Normandy Coast was "The Legend of La Hougue Bie," and because of it Ed Hougue would never Anglicize his name to Hogue. Sometimes in the Ellsworth documents it is spelled correctly - mostly not.
After he arrived in Kansas in the late 60s he evidently decided to switch his name from O. E. Hougue to Ed. O. Hougue. However, on the 1870 Census for Hays City he still appears as "O. E. Hoague, 33 - Bar Keeper - born "at Sea"
Since he was born 1847, the age is exactly 10 years off. He is actually 23, which is verified by the 1875 Kansas State Census at Dodge City, which lists him correctly as 28. I assume he was wanting to declare his heritage by giving his nativity as "France" in his instance. Here we see that his wife Louisa J. (Smith) Hogue is a 24-year-old Georgia peach. They have one daughter Edna, age 5 months. They will have one more daughter, before Ed hightails it to the Black Hills in '76, gets sick with Mountain fever, drops back down to chjeyenne where he dies with Morgan Earp at his side.

Finally the point I want to make is that the name "Ed Hogue" engraved on the Colt M1860 would not not by his request, but more probably a gift, with the accidental spelling used, which he would not approve of.
 

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Just stumbled on to this website and thought I should share a few things about "Ed Hogue." Having researched him for many years, I am now sitting on an 86-page unpublished biography. He was actually born Olivier Edouard Hougue - at sea - while his parents were immigrating across the Atlantic from the coast of Normandy, France. I have to mention the significance of his heritage over there, which he learned when a teenager, having gone back to France for a while till age 17. Then he returned to
One of the most important things about the Normandy Coast was "The Legend of La Hougue Bie," and because of it Ed Hougue would never Anglicize his name to Hogue. Sometimes in the Ellsworth documents it is spelled correctly - mostly not.
After he arrived in Kansas in the late 60s he evidently decided to switch his name from O. E. Hougue to Ed. O. Hougue. However, on the 1870 Census for Hays City he still appears as "O. E. Hoague, 33 - Bar Keeper - born "at Sea"
Since he was born 1847, the age is exactly 10 years off. He is actually 23, which is verified by the 1875 Kansas State Census at Dodge City, which lists him correctly as 28. I assume he was wanting to declare his heritage by giving his nativity as "France" in his instance. Here we see that his wife Louisa J. (Smith) Hogue is a 24-year-old Georgia peach. They have one daughter Edna, age 5 months. They will have one more daughter, before Ed hightails it to the Black Hills in '76, gets sick with Mountain fever, drops back down to chjeyenne where he dies with Morgan Earp at his side.

Finally the point I want to make is that the name "Ed Hogue" engraved on the Colt M1860 would not not by his request, but more probably a gift, with the accidental spelling used, which he would not approve of.
You have presented some interesting and new (to me) information. I also have studied saloons in the west. One thing that was absolutely required of a successful saloon man -- is that he had to be capable of controlling the unruly among his patrons! If one killing occurs in a saloon, most likely in the days following no one wants to go there. Why? Because too many times the friends of the deceased will return for revenge.

Thus successful saloon operators were also often lawmen. Not at the same time, but before or after. It was considered a "conflict of interest" to be both at the same time. So Ed Hogue's qualities as a man who could exert control possibly got him that bar keeper's job at an early age. In fact, it was almost unheard of for a saloon man to be only 23! Most were 33 to 50+.
 
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