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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I'm new here and recently became the proud owner of a Colt Model 1895 New Navy revolver in .38 Long Colt. The Colt was at a local shop for $250 mainly because it was broken and the cylinder did not rotate when pointed slightly upward. Opened the sideplate to find the issue was a broken rebound spring on the hand that rotates the cylinder which is a simple fix since I found a replacement part already.

My main question however is regarding the Colt 1889 cartridge feed pack. This was a brass stamped speed loader with a wooden dowel in the middle to hold the cartridge inside the brass cartridge pack. I saw one selling on ebay and tried contacting the seller to get dimensions on it for the purpose of reproducing two for my replica pistol cartridge box (Spanish American War US Navy reenactor here!). Never got the questions answered and the only reply was that it was being sold for the father and he didn't want to give out the measurements which was rather odd.

So since I couldn't get an answer from them the National Museum of the US Navy in Washington DC suggested I join this forum to see if any collectors on here happened to have one in their collection and would be willing for forward dimensions to replicate one. I realize these are rare since they were basically made to load the revolver and then be disposed off. If there is anyone interested in forward all the dimensions possible to replicate the 1889 cartridge feed pack feel free to PM me them?

Thanks in advance!

Richard
 

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This interests me also Richard.

I hope you can get the info you need, and, also, share it with us.

I have come across some info on these at times, but only in passing, and I did not print any of it out.
 

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Welcome to the Forum!

While it is too late now, the logical course would have been to buy the feedpack offered, no matter what the cost. If you could not afforded to keep it, you could have resold it after getting the information to reproduce it. If you are in a reenactor group, surely someone in your group has a feedpack. If not, that is another reason to have bought the original, because you could have manufactured them for resale to your group.

If you know what the feedpack looks like, and you believe you could duplicate the design if only you had measurements, then it would seem that you could interpolate the dimensions based on the cylinder in your revolver.

Hindsight is always clear, but, if another ever appears for sale, don't miss out on the next one.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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'Quick Loaders' aren't new.

When the Schofield was in Service, there was a wooden 'spool' that was cut to fit the round and they were held in place by a glued paper strip, or a brass one.

They were called the 'Kelton Pistol Pack' and they were invented by Brevet Brigadier General John C. Kelton, who was granted two Patents - #331,891 - issued on December 8, 1885, and # 394,373 - issued December 11, 1889.

A similar device was manufactured by Colt - Patent # 402,424 granted to Carl J. Ehbets - and was patented on April 30, 1889 - and they were sold to the Navy, along with the Model 1889 .38 revolvers.

A search of the Patent will give you drawings and specifications.

No record of the number that Colt made, but it's doubtful there were many produced, and though they made 200 of the 'Kelton Pistol Packs' for Trials with the Schofield - none were adopted - none were made for civilian use.

Back then, as now - the primary weapon was the long gun.

These sold for .25 - at a time when that was considered 'real money' - and most were discarded upon initial use - necessitating new purchase at a time when the military budget was well and truly strapped.

The 'Model 1896 Revolver Cartridge Box' is what was issued at the time of the Spanish American War - the earlier ones were phased out by then - it features a wooden block bored to hold 12 rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
dogface6; The 1889 pistol cartridge boxes were actually still used in 1898 believe it or not by both the US Navy and US Marine Corps ship detachments. There is enough photographic evidence from the crew of the USS Olympia just after the Battle of Manila Bay to prove this. Thanks for the helpful info as well with other patent dates and number. Yes the style by Carl J Ehbets on April 30th, 1889 is not the same as the production design that came out.
 
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