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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to share a pic of the latest and oldest Colt to be added to my collection. I just bought what I believe to be a model 1892 New Navy (granddad of the Official Police). It is chambered in .41 Long Colt with a 4 1/2" barrel. My dealer got it a little over a year ago from an estate along with a second issue Officer's Model in similar condition. I promptly bought the Officer's Model then for a good negotiated price, but left the 1892 to languish on the shelf for lack of funds, and my reservations about ammo availability. Well, it finally came home today to join its partner after a little convincing on my part to let me "make some room" in his case and get it out of the way. The serial # is 220xxx, dating it to 1903 according to proofhouse.com. The last patent date on top of the barrel is Mar 5, '95. There is barely a turn line on one set of locking notches, the other set does NOT have a turn line. The bore and chambers are mirror bright. I believe that there is a chance that it might be unfired as I would think that a cartridge being fired would leave a ring, even in the straight through chambers of the .41 Long Colt. From what I have read here, I believe it is a navy because the hard rubber stocks have a small Colt with the rampant horse, as can be seen in the photo. The stocks are numbered to the gun with the same assembly number scratched into the inside of each as is found in the cylinder crane. Original asking price was $700, but I got him down to $500. Two questions: How did I do valuewise? Any suggestions as to a source for ammo? More than likely it will be for display only. I probably will not fire this revolver due to the exceptional condition.
 

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Congratulations on this find. I probably wouldn't fire it, either, in the condition you describe. I also don't even turn the cylinder when there's not already a line.

I'd want a period box of ammo. If you know what you're looking for, gun shows can be a good source for that. Also, try Ray Giles' site: www.rtgammo.com; I'm sure there are others.
 

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Beee- utee -iful gun,N Frame! Does look unfired. Based on the stocks,it is the Army model. Navy had the word "COLT" spelled out in an ovel at the top,very similar to the New Services,1898-1926,or so. Some of the Army Models had the 1892 date under the "pony". For commercial guns,thats the only difference 'tween the Army and Navy models; of course those guns sold to the military,usually had smooth wooden stocks.

As far as ammo,factory loads are expensive,like $75 a box of 50 when you can find them. I have an SAA and an Army Special,that I reload .41 Colts for,and have tested all types of loads over the past dozen years. They are NOT as inaccurate as some would lead you to think,especially with a well cast hollow base bullet with a quick blow from some fast burning smokeless that allows it to expand. Plus they have a "wallop" at under 25 yards or so,as several one shot nocturnal raccoon kills have shown to me!

These "left wheelers" still remain "sleepers" and great buys for collectors. Compare its price with a New Service of the same vintage/condition!!!

Although I have been known to "deflower" some virgin revolvers,I'd probably leave this one alone,especially with the price of ammo,and its condition.

Bud
 

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Amazing how these century plus revolvers keep turning up in mint condition.

My congratulations, you sure did get a buy on that. I agree with Lonewolf, this type of revolver is the collectors sleeper. Most have not survived in anywhre near that shape.

We shoot a most of our old guns carefully with low pressure loads, but that one in 41, I would probably make it a safe queen, even though I dislike that expression.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the kind words and the info telling me it's an army and not a navy! I was thinking along the same lines as all of you as far as leaving it unfired.
 

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Hi NFrame_is_no1,

That's a really nice looking .41 DA! I collect the early Colt DA revolvers ... you said the assembly number on your gun is marked on the inside of the grips and matches the other assembly numbers on the gun... can you tell me if there is a small "N" or "j" inside the crane cutout on the frame? I am researching markings on the guns with matching grips and it would be interesting to know which one of these letters your's has. Thanks in advance for your help! Bob Best
 

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Here is one for your research,Bob. I have a 32/20 6 inch bbl., "Transistion Model",non rebated trigger guard,as you know. Serial # is 2890xx,assembly number is 9161,and is scratched inside one of the black "Navy" type stocks("COLT" name in oval.) Letter "N" is inside crane area.

Hope this helps the research.

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bob,
The assembly number 862 appears inside the crane area of the frame and also on the crane itself. A letter A is present next to the 862 on the crane area of the frame. The 862 is also on the cylinder latch and is scratched into both grip panels. Hope this helps!
Paul
 

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Hi Bud,
Thanks for sending along the information on your 32WCF DA New Navy revolver. The reason that I was asking about the "N" or the "j" is that Colt offered two models to their coustomers, The New Army Model with the "Rampant Colt" (horse) grips and the New Navy Model with the word "COLT" in an oval on the grips. Colt recorded the two models seperately in their ledger books so the serial numbers are mixed between two different record books... Makes it really tough to track down shipping information.
The only difference in the two models is the type of grips that they wore... I have found a correlation between a small "N" that appears in the cylinder yoke cut out of the frame and the New Navy Model revolvers. The New Army Models seem to have a small case "j" and no "N"... It would be helpful to Kathy if she knew if there was an "N" on the frame to start her search for record information in the New Navy Model area of the records... So far, all of the guns that I can verify that have the original Navy pattern (COLT Oval)grips that it came with, also have the "N" on the frame. THANKS for the research help! Bob Best
 
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