Colt Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I was looking for opinions on this Model 1917 U.S. Army. It appears to have, in my amateur opinion, a parkerized finish. Looking for an arsenal stamp, which would be indicative of a gun that was parkerized around World War II, I discovered a stamp, but it is the single letter "J". I have no been able to find any information regarding this marking, can anybody enlighten me on what it is? Perhaps just a sub-inspection mark?

Two questions. 1. Do you agree it is a parkerized, and what are your thoughts on it being an arsenal job, or civilian post war? 2. Does anybody have any information on the stamping of the letter J?

IMG_7788.jpg
IMG_7791.jpg

Let me know if the images are ok, or if I need to use photo bucket or another source.

Thank you in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,356 Posts
Looks like your photo was made in direct sunlight, and normally the true color doesn't show. Try making the photo in the shade.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,616 Posts
Apparently "Officially" parkerized Model 1917's were done in US arsenals and had arsenal stamps on the left side of the frame.
I have no idea what the "J" is, but it's no arsenal stamp I've ever seen.

What many people don't think about is not all US service firearms were refinished or repaired in US arsenals.
In the field, if a firearm needed repair or refinishing they were done by various levels of Ordnance organizations.
These ranged from repairs done by installing replacement parts done right behind the lines, to higher level echelons that could do major repairs and parkerizing.

When done by Ordnance NO stamps or other identifying marks were done. The gun was simply repaired or refinished as needed and returned to the unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Stay away from photo bucket, they are trying to charge their members $500 to post to third parties. Just go advanced and upload from your computer. Nice 1917, I just put one on layaway myself.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thank you for the information thus far. Let me try to upload some more photographs. That picture was not in sunlight, just under several lights I use to photograph portions of my collection for inventory purposes, i.e. where is this and what is this. I will try to get some photographs in the shade tomorrow though, thank you Johnny.

Dfaris: That is the is what I found in my research, I also have a list of the Arsenals and corresponding markings, and I'm aware it could have been done in the field or even potentially post World War II, and not in arsenal. That is partly why I'm asking, my uncertainty surrounding that, the parkerized finish, and the "J" Stamp.

Wolf:

IMG_7788.jpg IMG_7791.jpg IMG_7792.jpg IMG_7794.jpg IMG_7795.jpg View attachment 400609
Oldhand: Thank you! They are a handsome and massive revolver, I have a new appreciation for them. I'm more accustomed to firearms before the year 1900, so the subtleties of the Model 1917 are on lost on me, but usually I can definitively come to a solution to a question I have. However, this has me stumped, which is why I'm asking for more informed opinions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,356 Posts
If the revolver was refinished while still in military inventory it will have numbers on the major parts so that they can be put back together. Unlike the Model 1911/1911A1, the parts of the Model 1917 Revolver had been fitted together, and had to go back together after refinishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,411 Posts
It's hard to say, but your gun may have been refinished after WWII. The surface prep is quite good, but there is some damage (like buggered screw heads) that probably happened post-rebuild. I've seen parkerized finishes on them that looked like that. There generally won't be any refinishing parts numbers on the post WWII rebuilds. They are generally only on guns refinished by U.S.Armories after WWI. I've also seen Armory-refinished revolvers that had no rebuild numbers at all. Every rule seems to have exceptions.

Buck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
It looks refinished to me. It's missing the "cross-sanded" band at the front sight. As to the finish, I have a reblued 1895 that looks like that finish (left in the cooker too long).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice looking revolver.:cool:
Thank you Oldhand.

And thank you everyone else for your opinions, I greatly appreciate them.

I understand Bob Murphy wrote a book regarding this particular Model of Revolver, is it still considered the authority on the subject?
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top