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Picked this up today national match was wondering what a fair value is and if the frame is correct it’s in ok condition thanks?? 7E2D897A-AB21-4495-BA34-45F6C33C6A5D.png
 

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The slide doesn't indicate manufacturer - that's the frame's job - a 'Colt' slide will fit any aftermarket frame, as you now know.

What value it may possess is in that of a shooter - nothing more.
 

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Concur with Rick. Would check to see if barrel says National Match. Trigger and frame not Colt. If it works $400. If it works and hits what you aim at $500...maybe.
 

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Frame looks like it is one of the AR Sales alloy frame. Federal Ordnance also offered a similar "Ranger" Frame. Look under the left grip.
 

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Before you shoot it also field strip it and check the bottom of the slide. The slide looks like it came off 1966-1970 Gold Cup National Match so it should have cut outs at the rear. You can see the extractor for example during a field strip. I would not shoot hot 45ACP loads in it if that is the case and if a previous owner did then there may be a crack in this area.
 

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Before you shoot it also field strip it and check the bottom of the slide. The slide looks like it came off 1966-1970 Gold Cup National Match so it should have cut outs at the rear. You can see the extractor for example during a field strip. I would not shoot hot 45ACP loads in it if that is the case and if a previous owner did then there may be a crack in this area.
I personally think that is pure mythology. My reasoning comes from the fact that all commanders from 1949 through at least 1972 and possibly beyond have those lightning cuts. All National Match pistols have them. The Gold cups from 1970 on past 1972 also have them. All conversion kits and SM Ace pistols have them. I've carried a 1952 commander since around 1973 as a Leo back up and have shot somewhere around 30,000 full power rounds through it and it isn't cracked. A very close friend of mine bought his new in 1954 and has carried it ever since. He and I have shot at least 50,000 through his and it isn't cracked either. As a matter of fact, he loaned it to me for a backup when I started in 1972 and I used it for that purpose and an off duty carry until I obtained my own. Some have cracked and I have seen a few in the years when I was building IPSC guns and carry guns from around 1978 up through 2002. But the ones I have seen have all been commanders and the frames were also cracked from the slide stop hole forward at an angle up toward the front of the slide rails. I have seen a couple of NM slides that had a small crack under the extractor slot. But those were as slides for sale at gun shows, stripped. All total I have actually seen 2 slides and 2 commander frames cracked. Of interest is that both of those had shok buffs in them to which I attribute the frame cracks. Considering that I have worked on and built well over 1000 guns personally and own a considerable number in my collection including 9 guns with light slides, I have to believe that while it does happen once in a while, I don't think it is any more than rare. Also, my personal thoughts are that the use of shok buffs by people who want to shoot high powered ammo for defense has been responsible for a lot of the battering that I have seen in Colts. The shok buff shortens the cycle by allowing the slide to contact it prior to the end of the cycle. This increases the duration of the impact on the frame. And while it makes the total impact softer, it does make it longer. Like an earthquake, it is not the level of the quake that does the damage but the duration of the quake which causes things to crumble. From the standpoint of the potential for catastrophic damage to a pistol, I personally avoid shok buffs and I would not knowingly purchase a pistol that had had one in it. The light slides by the way are not only lighter where the circular mill cuts are made on each side of the disconnector boss but are also cut out and thinner from the area behind the barrel bushing to the front of the locking lugs. If full power loads were the cause, the slides should be cracking forward of the locking lugs through the body. But they aren't. The cracks that are found are immediately below the extractor where the slide is very thin and it is the weakest point. The ejector side is also cut out but the slide never cracks there. Keep in mind that they are heat treated after they are machined. I know there are lots of shok buff equipped guns out there that have not cracked. That's great and I'm happy for the owners. But there are some owners who are not happy. The frame was never intended to take the pressure of the slide recoiling. The end of the spring guide shouldn't take it either. The total of the coiled springs pushed to the rear should prevent contact. But installing shok buffs then alows that impact to be transferred to the frame. A shorter or weak spring would also allow the same thing to happen. Keep in mind in National Match pistols and Gold Cups post 1970, they have a slightly shorter and lighter recoil spring and a shorter and lighter mainspring. If one shoots full power ammo without changing out at least the recoil spring then one was at the time asking for a problem. The closest thing to a shok buff Colt ever used were the leather washers that were installed on the spring guide of original Ace pistols. The washers were nearly an inch long in total. These guns also had a shorter recoil spring. I haven't owned one or ever examined one to see how well that system worked.

Keep in mind that this is only my opinion. But the facts to me are clear that the slides aren't cracking from full power ammo but from the negligence of the owners not springing them for the intended use and counting on a .10 plastic washer to prevent a problem.
 

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If you shoot any 1911 enough it will crack someplace. Both of my original Series 70's, a 45 and a 38 Super cracked at the dust cover barrel abuttment left side. Both were actually thin there. The 45 from extended use, the 38 Super might be my fault as I used a full length spring in it and it was probably a lighter one.

My old 45 as well as my brothers Series 70 have a small crack at the ejector tunnel. This is where the lightened slides are more then likely to crack.
 

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Sorry to ruffle feathers. I have been shooting 1911s for almost 60 years. Not THAT old as I started when I was 9. Owned well over 1,000 1911s but not all Colts.

I think what prompted my statement was back in the 70s friends of mine were cutting down 30-06 (or was it 308) rifle cases and working on making a 45 ACP magnum or whatever. Guys like this probably gave us the 451 Detonics and the 45 Super. I did see a number of 1911s damaged.

When I see what looks like a "franken colt" with what I think is a lightened slide I would tend to worry myself about the history and insides of the pistol.

I will admit ignorance of the IPSAC or whatever. In the late 70s a friend dragged me into practical police pistol I think it was called. I had been shooting bullseye in prep school and college. Anyway we couldn't use a pistol as it was revolver only. The old rich farts had Pythons or S&W 27/28s. Us kids had S&W 19s or my dad found me a deal on a Colt Trooper MkIII. Then the belt, the holster, the speed loaders etc. Anyway that so turned me off against the running, jumping, spinning, ducking, gyrating, etc; all to the beeping of a timer, that I had no interest in ever getting near something like that again. So ignorance in that area.

And, for bigger than 45ACP, there is the .460 Rowland conversions on a 1911.
 

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Dakota1911, I doubt if you saw any "rich farts" at a PPC match since most, but not all, were active LEO's and a few retired LEO's. Real cops never made enough money to be considered rich. The python's did OK but the S&W's were the kings due to the faster action and the ease of barrel changing. The K frame S&W with a bull barrel and a full length Bomar ribbed sight was the king and most of those who went to Nationals and were successful used such a combination. The distinquished match was shot with a 4" duty weapon without much allowed in the way of modifications. PPC is basically bullseye for revolvers with time limits and no alibi's. IPSC is a practical shooting exercise that could be shot with any weapon though people who wanted to compete and win had to use a semi auto and most often shot a 1911 in some guise or other. Nowadays that has degenerated into NRA action shooting and there are shoots or matches that are not NRA action shooting that are held by some one off organization to alledgedly claim as training by a practical shooting group. There is also 3 gun shooting competition etc. But no matter how hard these groups try it is still virtually a professionals game with sponsorships and professional shooters at every level. That's what killed IPSC and led to the NRA taking it over. There are a lot of conversions on a 1911 including those you named which probably started with Dean Grinnells 38-45 conversion and grew from there. None of those are really aplicable to anything except fun and interest for those involved. For my money, if you want more than a .45 ACP delivers in a 1911, I would go to a revolver and I have several for that purpose. For hunting, I prefer a rifle and consider that hunting with a handgun may be fun, but I used to go after animals that I planned to eat and I didn't want them to have me trailing them for miles. My son likes his "Robin Hood" hunts and enjoys it. So be it, but my rifle shoots farther and harder than a arrow will ever go. But I suppose that's why theres chocolate and vanilla. Each to his own.
 
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