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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently picked up this Colt New Army and Navy model 1895. The gun has about 50% blue with the rest turned. In .38 Long Colt, the gun is mechanically tight. All matching numbers. Made in 1901, a much better gun than the contemporary Colt Lightening. It has a 4 1/2” barrel and a number were purchased by Wells Fargo in this barrel length. The gun came with a nice early flap holster that has formed to the gun. (The gun is resting on a copy of “Firearms Identification, Vol II,” by Mathews)
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I recently picked up this Colt New Army and Navy model 1895. The gun has about 50% blue with the rest turned. In .38 Long Colt, the gun is mechanically tight. All matching numbers. Made in 1901, a much better gun than the contemporary Colt Lightening. It has a 4 1/2” barrel and a number were purchased by Wells Fargo in this barrel length. The gun came with a nice early flap holster that has formed to the gun. (The gun is resting on a copy of “Firearms Identification, Vol II,” by Mathews) View attachment 704487 View attachment 704488
A Study Of Colt’s New Army And Navy Pattern Double Action Revolvers 1889-1908” by Robert Best is the definitive work on this model. You might want to look for a copy. Some of the military issues saw lots of action, and rework for further use.

The continued repairing and refinishing of these 38 caliber revolvers continued into both WWI and WWII. Just a few interesting notes received from Bob Best in 2009: “Over 19,000 guns were reworked by Remington in 1918. Some were also turned over to the British Purchasing Commission in 1940 and received a blue-black painted finish. Some were reworked many times and others not at all”.
 

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I recently picked up this Colt New Army and Navy model 1895.
With that style of original stocks, it should be a commercial New Navy. According to Bob Best, besides the stock style, only a small N below the assembly number in the crane cut distinguished it from the New Army. So that was basically a marketing gimmick. Technically, the 1895 New Navy was identical to the Army Model 1894.


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Discussion Starter #4
Great information! The pistol has the small N below the assembly number. Though I have had a number of these commercial versions of this model over the years, this is the first with a 4 1/2” barrel.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
A quick look on Amazon and there is available Robert Best’s book for a paltry $429 plus shipping.
 
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Not to be gloating, but for once I got lucky and was paying attention back in 2015 or so when Bob had the second limited run done, and got an autographed copy for about $100.
That is a hard book to find. My copy came from a TGCA friend who somehow wound up with two copies.
 

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Not to be gloating, but for once I got lucky and was paying attention back in 2015 or so when Bob had the second limited run done, and got an autographed copy for about $100.
Not to be gloating either, but I picked up a copy of Best’s book for $9.95 at a used book shop about five years ago. Mine is not autographed though. :)

I have no interest in these guns and don’t own a single one, but the book came in useful a few times in helping people identify their guns. I also collect gun books.
 

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Interestingly, unless the author held back copies of his book, the high prices never benefit the author.
 
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Interestingly, unless the author held back copies of his book, the high prices never benefit the author.
I think you get that paradox with this specific type of book, expensive to produce with lots of photos.

It is not of enough interest to enough people to make it economically feasible to get a publisher interested in printing more copies, and thus making the author more money.

But then there are a limited number of people, like present company, who are REALLY interested, and unless they get lucky like Winston and “inherit” a copy from someone who doesn’t care, may be willing to lay out big bucks for second hand copies.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
One thing, I find it strange that no one has noted the book I mentioned in my post. Also, to be clear, paying a high price for a book one needs as a reference I find acceptable. However, in this case, for me, I seldom have this model and do not see this as viable at a high price.
 
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One of the ones that were turned over to Britain in 1940 or 41. This one had a harder life.

Was your gun painted blue? I had one that was painted blue after re-work, and it went to Britain about that same time (1940). For the British Navy, I think.
 

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This much reworked Colt has the deeply-struck main serialNo 150354” on the butt, right below the “U. S. Army Model 1901” and the lanyard ring. On the left side of frame is “R.A.C.” with the cylinder latch marked “K / 354”. Again, on the frame inside the crane, is “R E / 354”. On the crane, just forward of the cylinder is “K / 354”. The rear of the cylinder indicates that some rework has occurred with “R.A.C. / 3204 / P / C”. Just ahead of the frame, on the underside of the barrel, is “RAC”.

Under the grips, on the right side of the grip frame is a larger “22” (of unknown meaning), and on the left side is the Colt inspector “2”. The grips have no visible number, but fit extremely well. Wear over the years has erased the government inspection letters and final inspection cartouche.

The two-line rolled barrel address ends in “Mar. 5. 95.” and contains an unbelievable number of die breaks! These die breaks accumulated over a number of years, using the same roll die. The left side is stamped “Colt D.A. 38”, using the same roll die as on the Colt Model 1877 “Lightning / Thunderer”. This barrel was set back at least one turn, during one of its past re-works. Notice how close the barrel address is to the front of frame.

Many untold years of rework and re-issue have left the lock-up very poor at this point. The chambers are for the original heeled-bullet 38 Colt, which required external lubrication. Essentially, the case mouth and major bullet diameter were the same. The front of each chamber (throat) on this gun measures 0.381”.
 

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One of the ones that were turned over to Britain in 1940 or 41. This one had a harder life.
Your picture's resolution is a bit low to distinguish any stampings. Does it have the 38/380 marking indication it was bored out for .380 British?
 
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