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There's a pawnshop near me that has had this revolver for some time. As I recall, the finish is about 70%, has decent grips and the lanyard ring is missing. It also has had adjustable sights added (long ago and they look like 30s/40s target sights). What would one pay for such a gun? I think the price as marked is $329, but it could probably be had for less (a year or more ago I offered $275 and he just put it back in the case). Thoughts?

Rob
 

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Teddydog,the BB as you probably know says that that piece even in 70% condition is worth about $550. I probably would not go that high, but I try to be frugal(read cheap). If it's not selling at that price, what else could be wrong with it?
Maybe you need to investigate a little more.



------------------
Dick

IN GOD WE TRUST,
BUT KEEP YOUR
SIDEARM HANDY!
 

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It appears as if there is no market for a butchered New Service and rightly so. What would you want it for? You can probably find a NS in 70% that has the lanyard swivel and original sights or integrity if you want to get it for a collection. It is hard to find parts and to get it repaired. The cost of restoring it could well exceed the cost of one that is complete. The NS went out of time just as easily as the other double action Colts and retiming can involve new triggers, hammers and hands or ratchets so be sure the timing is good on any prospective purchase. Ben
 

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I think CC overstates the timing problem, and what it takes to repair it. It is common to find double action Colts that are out of time, but it does not impair their function much since pulling the trigger always pushes the cylinder into lockup before the hammer falls. Brisk cocking will also cause the cylinder to roll to lock up from inertia as well. Usually, all that it takes to fix the problem is replacement of the hand, or stretching of the hand. I have fixed lots of them over the years and it has never taken more than a hand.

I agree that the modified NS is worth little, except for parts. (Since no mention is made of it being out of time, the hand would be of value to someone like CC!) Such guns are what make unmolested examples worth so much. However, after seeing a chromed military M1911 bring many hundred dollars on one of the auction sites, it proves that there are fools out there with strange tastes and values. I would not buy it unless for parts.
 

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I guess it depends on whether or not you want a collection piece or a shooter. I've always liked the long-barrelled New Service and recently bought one in .45 LC w/7.5" barrel at a gun show. The gun was all matching and the timing was good. It had been nicely reblued. The lanyard ring was gone and the hole welded up before blueing. The yoke was just a tad loose, but tightened up when the trigger was pulled all the way to the rear. I gave $240 for it, which I figure was about what it was worth. It shoots great and that long barrel makes 100-yd shots on pig silhouettes do-able about half the time. The point is that the gun you're looking at, like mine, has no real value beyond the fact that I'm willing to pay $240 for a nice .45 LC shooter. A new S&W 625-5 will set you back twice this amount. If you're itching to have a nice shooter (and they're great fun to shoot) then offer $300 or $325 and see what happens.
 
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