Colt Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
Many years ago, a friend had a New Service that had the C prefix number on the right side of the frame. His was a .455 that had been re-chambered to .45 Colt and had that caliber marking applied to the barrel overstamped on top of the original .455 Eley caliber marking. I was a former British military weapon.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
Based on picture #3 of the rear face of the cylinder, I would say it was originally a .455. Note the small countersink areas around each chamber mouth. They are exactly like the ones on my revolver, which chambers .45 Colt but is still marked .455 Eley. The .455 round's rim was thinner than the .45 Colt rim, but also just a wee bit bigger in diameter, so the countersink was done to allow the thicker rim to seat further into the cylinder. The alternative would have been to machine off the entire rear face of the cylinder, as was done with the .45ACP conversions, but that would have removed the markings from the rear face of the cylinder. By doing the countersink, the revolver will now chamber and fire both the .45 Colt and the originl .455 Eley round. The countersink allows both to headspace properly.

Somewhere I have information, but I can't find the docunentation just now, that some of these New Services were purchased by Great Britian for the World War and were later sent back to Colt's for refurbishment and then on to Canada in time for the Second World War. Mine has the British markings, as seen on yours, as well as a "C" with a Broad Arrow in it (Canadian marking) on the right side of the frame and an "E" under the stocks.

These were originally bright blue, but mine has a dull, sort of bead blasted blue finish, and is also marked BB7 on the cylinder and on the frame under the stocks and 7BB on the crane. I have often wondered if this is a rebuild marking indicating bead blast and a number to keep the fitted parts together.

It sounds like you may have one that has a similar history, with an additional polish and re-finish after its military service was over.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top