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Hell, I am new to this forum and new to considering the purchase of a Colt NS in 45 Colt. I simply like this old caliber (have a Ruger Bisley in it) and am thinking about the NS.

I see from other posts that it will handle cowboy-action ammo fine. Is there other factory loaded ammo that it will handle OK. How do you tell if a factory round will be OK or not in this gun?

What do you look for and look out for in a NS before purchasing one?

Thanks! Dick
 

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Any Colt New Service chambered in .45 Colt will handle any standard factory .45 Colt loadings.

In purchasing a NS, look for originality and condition. Buy as much of each as you can afford. I personally like the long barrels in late guns, but they are all nice if original. (Actually, the New Service Targets are my favorites, but they are scarce and much more costly.) The NS revolvers are so old that many are altered and refinished, so be careful.
 

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First,welcome to the Forum. The New Service is a strong gun,and will digest regular Winchester & Remington 255 gr. and I think Federal makes(or made) a nice 225 gr lead HP,that I used to carry in a 4 1/2" N.S. along with WW Silvertips before I reloaded. I would NOT use any of the Corbon or other hi speed ammo,besides the New Service will shoot low with its fixed sights with 200 gr. or less bullets. Your ahead of the game,as you want a "shooter",not a high priced pristine collector piece. I would make sure the barrel marking says "New Service .45 Colt". Some have been rebarrelled with 1917 Army barrels that will say, "Colt D.A. 45". This might be OK for a shooter-BUT-the cylinder is the key! Bring an empty .45 Colt case with you to make sure that it is a .45 Colt cylinder-NOT- for the .45 Auto! Some of us can tell bu seeing the depth of the chamber ridges and the space between the rear of the cylinder and the frame,but make sure you check. The N.S. will have a stiff double action pull,but single action will be great. Pull the hammer slowly and see that the as the gun cocks the cylinder is fully locked. Many older Colts will not fully lock until the trigger is pulled. As long as this is a tiny amount its OK. Check that the there is no gap between the crane & the frame when the crane is closed. There are other checks,but hard to explain. Unless you have a very large hand,usually a grip adapter will help. In my case,the older "L" shaped cylinder latches,until around 1926,can lacerate my thumb,but I think this is my hold. Good Luck! Bud
 
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