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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first post on the Forum, but I have been reading it for a couple of weeks now. Normally I can find answers to my questions from previous posts. I have always been a collector of semi-auto firearms and Civil War weapons. Recently, I have gotten involved with Revolvers; both Colt and S&W. Still, the Colt is my No. 1 Revolver! Now, I have a question I can't find and answer to, so here goes:

I purchased a Colt Officer's Model, heavy barrel revolver with a S/N of 3440XX. On the top of the barrel are the patent dates with the last one of 1926. On the left middle is the stamp of COLT, Officers Model, 38 and under this is Heavy Barrel. The front sights are adjustable for windage and rear sight is adjustable. The revolver is in approximately 92-94% condition.

According to the S/N, it is a 1912 revolver, but the last patent date being 1926, it can't be a 1912 manufacture date. I will attempt to add a couple of photos. I appreciate all the help to clear up the date of manufacture. I also look forward to sharing updates and assisting others.

Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Gun accessory Product Metal Revolver Gun barrel Pipe Cylinder Tool accessory Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Gun accessory
 

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The Consummate Collector
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It appears that someone has changed the barrel on your revolver. The stocks are from the 1912 era so I assume they are original to the frame. The heavy barrel didn't appear on these until 1935.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thecoltguy,

Thank you very much for the information! This is the only answer that I had come up with, but being new to revolvers I was not sure and wanted confirmation of my assumption. Yes, the grips are original to the frame S/N. Whoever performed the barrel change did an excellent job, there are no indications from scratches, or dings the barrel was replaced.
 

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The Consummate Collector
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thecoltguy,

Thank you very much for the information! This is the only answer that I had come up with, but being new to revolvers I was not sure and wanted confirmation of my assumption. Yes, the grips are original to the frame S/N. Whoever performed the barrel change did an excellent job, there are no indications from scratches, or dings the barrel was replaced.
It was probably sent back to Colt for an upgrade sometime after the Heavy Barrel was introduced. It looks to be in great condition and should be an excellent shooter. Enjoy!
 

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where did you check for mfg date? did you check on proofhouse.com or coltmfg.com? looking at the picture that gun looks all original. the wear on the barrel matches the rest of the gun. if that is a rebarrel it must have been done a long long time ago. colt factory maybe?
 

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Beautiful in any case. Mine is in nowhere as good a condition. Shoots great though... best trigger in my stable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Bob Wright,

As to your question, there is a small screw on the right side of the front site, and I thought this may be an adjustment. It may be a locking screw????

On the serial number, I checked both proofhouse.com and coltmfg.com and they came up with the same date. This is where I thought the barrel did not fit the date of manufacture and after chcking many thread on this Forum, I needed help to resolve my question. It definetly appears that the barrel was changed after 1935. I don't know if Colt did this work or not, but the revolver does not appear to have been reblued. Does Colt mark their firearms if reworked at the factory?

I really do appreciate the comments and help for all of you. i have also obtained more Colts and, pardon me for this, a few Smith & Wessons too! I will make some photos of more Colt I have and post them on the Forum. One of favorites is a 1878 Double Action in .45 LC made in 1892. The odd thing about this one is there was never a Lanyard Loop installed. I have the book on the 1878 and it states there was only two shipped in that year with ejector and no lanyard Loop. One went to an individual and the other in late 1892 to Simmons Harware in St Louis, Mo. The serial number 304465. I hope to make up some BP rounds and fire her soon.
 

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As to your question, there is a small screw on the right side of the front site, and I thought this may be an adjustment. It may be a locking screw????
The front sight adjustment is for elevation. Any adjustment for windage or left to right, if you will, on your revolver if it isn't quite dead on is a side to side and is accomplished with the rear sight adjustment screw. Here's a thread the discusses sights on a .22 OM but is relevant for other calibers.

http://www.coltforum.com/forums/colt-revolvers/41279-adjusting-sights-officers-model.html
 

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Those stocks are fantastic!!!
I have a note (with a question mark behind it) stating that those stocks, with both Rampant Colts facing the same direction, were available from 1913 to 1923. I have an identical numbered-to-the-gun pair on OM 451xxx (1920) but I think I made that note from a thread on a SAA with forward facing Colt medallions. So, the dates may refer only to the medallions.

Dick
 

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Collect older handguns from Colt and S&W primarily
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Abwehr,

An outfit called Ten-X makes cowboy action shooting ammunition and you can get black powder .45 Colt loads from them. I've used them on several occasions; once in my Colt Army Model 1909.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
MtnSpur,

Thank you so much for the link on how to adjust the sights on my revolver! I copied this information just so I don't forget, LOL!!!

DS326

Thanks for the information on the stocks! I have been collecting firearms for 45 years. 90% of these have been WWII Military German and Axis weapons and the remainder are Civil War Cavalry Carbines & Hanguns. I think my intrest in the Civil War got me started on the Colt Revolvers first. I have 1849 Colt Pockets, 1851 and 1860 Colt revolvers. I also have my GGG's Cavalry carbine, Sword and Whitney revolver he brought back when the war ended. He was in the 4th SC Cavalry and was one of approx. 12 that survived the entire war and never surrendered. I had never been interested much in revolvers until I had to have some for the Civil War collection. I feel like a "babe in the woods" right now and I am glad I found this Forum. I first try to find information I need in my book collection or internet. I am getting some books on the Colt revolvers so I can understand the details of this fine firearm. I do confess, I am getting a few S&W's too, but don't hold that against me, LOL.

LaVistBill,

Thanks for the information on Ten-X. I have also been into cowboy action shooting and use the Ruger New Vaquero in .45 LC. I try to be as authentic as I can so I load my own .45 LC rounds; in Black Powder. I also use Black powde,r brass case shotgun shell in my Colt Double barrel. I love the smell of Black Powder! I need to check out Ten-X for other cartridges for shooting in these older revolvers, especially the 1877 and 1878 revolvers!

All you guys have been a great help to me and I hope to learn enough soon to help you out sometimes too!!!!!!
 
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