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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another member who goes by the handle "wehii" posted this in the Old Colt advertisement photo thread. I told him he should post it here instead to get more feedback on it but it doesn't appear that he comes to the forum very often so I wanted to go ahead and do it for him. I hope he doesn't mind. I was just too curious myself to see what other experts here think of this document. I'm thinking if it is the real deal it is certainly worth several thousand dollars. I've never seen one before. Here is what he wrote on the other thread:

I found the attached document while going through papers that belonged to a gentleman who passed almost 25 years ago. He was a serious percussion Colt collector who owned a Texas Paterson which was acquired in the mid 1960's. This was with copies of the letters documenting the Paterson when it was acquired. The paper would have been acquired no later than the mid 1970's. I have not seen this previously and would appreciate any comments.

 

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Back when it was purchased, all manner of 'faux-aged' paper was on the market - Wanted posters, Civil War Recruiting posters, Confederate paper bills, Slave auctions, and so on and so forth.

As far as I know, they still are.

I have a couple of the Recruiting posters - this looks exactly like those - all artfully torn and displayable...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Back when it was purchased, all manner of 'faux-aged' paper was on the market - Wanted posters, Civil War Recruiting posters, Confederate paper bills, Slave auctions, and so on and so forth.

As far as I know, they still are.

I have a couple of the Recruiting posters - this looks exactly like those - all artfully torn and displayable...
Indeed. Seems worthy of taking it to an expert to see if it is authentic.
 

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The text is identical to known printed instructions. The drawing seems crude in comparison.
Colt Paterson loading instructions.jpg

Expert forensic analysis of paper and ink would be very helpful.
 

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The text is identical to known printed instructions. The drawing seems crude in comparison.


Expert forensic analysis of paper and ink would be very helpful.
It's not identical at all. The text is in cursive, and the title block is also hand written. The other example is typeset print.
 

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I do not believe that Colt used the word "wedge" back then. This part is named the "key" on a number of patent drawings.


Very true. In fact, Colt was still using the word "key" in his 1858 catalog. But the Broadway address documents were the work of Ehlers, not Colt.

This is from the New York Historical Society Quarterly, reprinted in Serven's Colt Firearms:

Colt Paterson rifle directions.jpeg
 

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It's not identical at all. The text is in cursive, and the title block is also hand written. The other example is typeset print.
I'm sorry if I was not clear. The words are the same. The fonts in which they are reproduced are quite different, as you point out.
 

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I agree with twaits, I believe the first one is a faked document. I remember like he said, all kid of faux paper documents that were out because of Civil and Revolutionary War reenacting. I have a couple from back then, so I recognize the technique. The second one, IMO, is correct, but only a true document conservator or Colt paper expert would know for sure.
 

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The document would need hands on examination. It is marked as printed by Narine & Co., Lith 11 Wall St N.Y. (Lower left hand corner)
This was a printer active at that location 1839 - 1843. The paper looks ok, the foxing looks right. The printing looks right for an early 19th century lithograph. It has the correct slight bleed, and there is no sign of any pixelation comparable with modern offset printing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree with twaits, I believe the first one is a faked document. I remember like he said, all kid of faux paper documents that were out because of Civil and Revolutionary War reenacting. I have a couple from back then, so I recognize the technique. The second one, IMO, is correct, but only a true document conservator or Colt paper expert would know for sure.
I didn't say I thought it was faked. I said it ought to be looked at by expert eyes
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I do not believe that Colt used the word "wedge" back then. This part is named the "key" on a number of patent drawings.

Rio
The printed example from a Julia auction uses the word "Wedge"
I assume the one from Julias is a verified original document.
 

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The New York store on Broadway was run by John Ehlers, the treasurer of the Patent Arms Manufacturing Company. He used the term “wedge”, rather than Sam Colt’s preferred word “key”.
Here is an Ehlers ad from the 1845 Doggett’s New York City Directory. From the H.G. Houze Collection, Cody, Wyoming, reprinted in Samuel Colt: Arms, Art and Invention.

Colt Paterson  directions.jpeg
 

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I would like to thank twaits for transferring my original post to this thread as well as all who have commented. As I noted this document has been stored in a briefcase since 1995 and I just recently happened upon it. I too have seen the wanted posters, Confederate money and other reproduction items but this does have a somewhat different overall appearance. Like so many my initial question was whether it is fake or original and I assume this will persist unless we have it evaluated by a document examiner. What is unusual, particularly if it is a reproduction, is that it certainly is not in wide circulation. Thank you again for the research and assistance and if we do get any expert evaluation I shall add it to this thread.
 

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Hi wehiii
I don't think you will find an expert on what you have there, as they don't exist. You have there a nice find and is a nice piece of Colt early history. Have you tried contacting Colt, they may be more helpful in there findings. Thanks for posting a good bit of information via twaits.
Kind regards, ALSS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi wehiii
I don't think you will find an expert on what you have there, as they don't exist. You have there a nice find and is a nice piece of Colt early history. Have you tried contacting Colt, they may be more helpful in there findings. Thanks for posting a good bit of information via twaits.
Kind regards, ALSS.
But he can find an expert in the age of the document which is what is most important. If the document is verified to be made in the 1830-1840 time period we can be rest assured that it is not a fake.
 

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I apologize, but I agreed with your assessment, my assessment is that it is a fake. I should have separated the two statements to make them clearer.

I didn't say I thought it was faked. I said it ought to be looked at by expert eyes
 
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