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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello. I just purchased a nice Colt Police Positive 38 last week from my local hardware store's gun shop but I'm confused on the markings. According to the serial number proof house is saying it was made in 1908. The barrel says COLT POLICE POSITIVE 38 but the frame has the rampant horse with the circle going around it saying Colt's New Police. Is this because colt took the 38 S&W round and called it 38 Colt New Police and changed the bullet to a flat head? Or is this gun a parts gun made from older parts assembled into a new revolver?:confused: All of the numbers match. Both grips are marked underneath with the serial number on both panels. Also, the cylinder release is the older flat style. Grips are in very nice shape without any cracks or gouges. It still has bright fire blue on the top and back of the hammer and some on the trigger. Bore looks good but I haven't shot it yet. I basically bought it because a few years ago a friend of mine gave me 300 rounds of Remington 38 Colt New Police ammo that was made in the 70's. Only problem was, I knew it would not chamber in any of my 38 specials and I didn't have the correct gun for the ammo. Now I have one and it fits in nice with my police positive special. Any help is greatly appreciated!

Will
 

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I'm bet it is a transition gun. I think the New Police was made up until about 1907. Colt introduced the positive lock about that time and hence the Police Positive. Colt was probably just using up old frames. Interesting Colt.
 

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Hello. I just purchased a nice Colt Police Positive 38 last week from my local hardware store's gun shop but I'm confused on the markings. According to the serial number proof house is saying it was made in 1908. The barrel says COLT POLICE POSITIVE 38 but the frame has the rampant horse with the circle going around it saying Colt's New Police. Is this because colt took the 38 S&W round and called it 38 Colt New Police and changed the bullet to a flat head? Or is this gun a parts gun made from older parts assembled into a new revolver?:confused: All of the numbers match. Both grips are marked underneath with the serial number on both panels. Also, the cylinder release is the older flat style. Grips are in very nice shape without any cracks or gouges. It still has bright fire blue on the top and back of the hammer and some on the trigger. Bore looks good but I haven't shot it yet. I basically bought it because a few years ago a friend of mine gave me 300 rounds of Remington 38 Colt New Police ammo that was made in the 70's. Only problem was, I knew it would not chamber in any of my 38 specials and I didn't have the correct gun for the ammo. Now I have one and it fits in nice with my police positive special. Any help is greatly appreciated!

Will
Hi Will,

Some images would be fun to see!

From what you describe, all sounds right - the earliest 'Police Positives' were made using a Barrel which said "Police Positive" and the Circular Text on the Frame, which read "Colt's New Police"....which was soon replaced with the 'Rampant Colt' emblem in a stylized "C", then the "Stylized C" was dropped by 1912 or so, leaving just the Rampant Colt Emblem.

Should be a sweet little Revolver!
 

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Shooter91, you may be onto something with your question about the ammunition. Colt gave the same name to both a revolver and to the ammunition. I have a 1906 .32 Police Positive and a 1907 .38 Police Positive, each with the COLT'S NEW POLICE stamp. The New Police revolver was .32 caliber, only. The Police Positive .38 has a larger frame, and I don't think the sideplates are interchangeable.

Colt75, they're called transitionals, all right, (the Blue Book even says they command a 10% premium--they refer to them as being 'double marked') and I'm certainly no expert, but around 1909 Colt changed to the stylized C stamp. TBOCF, on page 381, under Markings states, "On the left side of the frame, rampant colt encircled by: #COLT'S# NEW POLICE (through c. 1909)."

So, I'm wondering if any forum member has a pre-1909 Police Positive .38 that isn't stamped Colt's New Police? I can't compare my sideplates because the .38 still has the old style stepped triggerguard with a corresponding step in the sideplate, while the .32 has the contoured style. But, if Colt is going to refer to the .38 S&W round as the "New Police," why not continue the use of that stamp on the frame?

Dick

Hi, Oyeboten,

Every time I try to "Refresh" the computer to see if someone has posted ahead of me, my reply goes away. So, I quit doing that and apologize for stepping on you.
 

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I have a nice Pocket Positive that is marked New Pocket around the Colt on the side plate but the barrel is marked Pocket Positive on the right side. I opened it for cleaning and inspection/loobing and verified that it is a "positive". It dates to 1907, chambered in 32 Colt.
Interestingly enough, I also have a Police Positive dated to 1906 that is not a transition gun. Interesting variations exist in interesting ways.
 

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Interestingly enough, I also have a Police Positive dated to 1906 that is not a transition gun. Interesting variations exist in interesting ways.
Hi, MMCSRET--Is that 1906 PP a .32 or a .38? And, what is stamped on the sideplate?

Thanks,

Dick
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi everyone. Thank You all for the help. I was researching into my old reloading books from my father and found out some good information about the ammunition. I have to say this is one of the few revolver rounds which I ever studied. Anyway, Smith and Wesson introduced the 38 S&W round. When colt developed the police positive revolver in 38 caliber, they didn't want to mark 38 S&W on their gun. So what they did was take the existing 38 S&W round and change the bullet from a round nose to a flat head and make it 150 grains instead of 148 grains which is what the 38 S&W was originally loaded with. The case is the same however. The rounds are the same but have 2 different names. The revolver is defiantly a transition revolver. Oyeboten, I will gladly post some pictures when I get my new camera. It will be a few days. I think I'm going to take it out for a walk in the woods tomorrow and put a few rounds through it. I'll keep everyone on this thread posted within the next few day with pictures. Thanks again everyone! I appreciate the help.

Will
 

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1906 PP is a 32 Police, 6" barrel. The only thing on the side plate is the Rampant Colt.
 

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1906 PP is a 32 Police, 6" barrel. The only thing on the side plate is the Rampant Colt.
Can you post some images of it so we can compare it to the OP's once they get their images Posted?

Does it have the Flat Latch? - and the 'straight' Barrel form, no swell at the Barrel where it meets the Frame?
 

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Hi everyone. Thank You all for the help. I was researching into my old reloading books from my father and found out some good information about the ammunition. I have to say this is one of the few revolver rounds which I ever studied. Anyway, Smith and Wesson introduced the 38 S&W round. When colt developed the police positive revolver in 38 caliber, they didn't want to mark 38 S&W on their gun. So what they did was take the existing 38 S&W round and change the bullet from a round nose to a flat head and make it 150 grains instead of 148 grains which is what the 38 S&W was originally loaded with. The case is the same however. The rounds are the same but have 2 different names. The revolver is defiantly a transition revolver. Oyeboten, I will gladly post some pictures when I get my new camera. It will be a few days. I think I'm going to take it out for a walk in the woods tomorrow and put a few rounds through it. I'll keep everyone on this thread posted within the next few day with pictures. Thanks again everyone! I appreciate the help.

Will
I bet it turns out to be a fine shooter!

I do not have one that early, but, I have one which is circa 1909 and it is very accurate and easy to make very tight groups with, off hand. It is really too small for my Hands, and yet somehow I can just nail the Target with it...really a sweet little Revolver.
 

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I am unable to load pics in this forum. The latch is the rounded, checked latch common to all my PP revolvers as well as my PPS guns. The barrel is not straight, it is bossed into the frame and tapers to the muzzle.
If I could figure out the pic situation I'd be happy to show you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Revolver Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Starting pistol Gun Revolver Trigger
Oyeboten, here are some pictures for you to look at. I havent had a chance to fire the revolver yet. It still has the hanging tags on it from the gun shop. It does have the old style flat latch. Notice the frame marking and barrel marking. Let me know if you need anymore pictures. I will gladly post them. Thank You for your help!

Will
 
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