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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the guns pictured below I purchased direct from an old Colt Employee.
I was told by the gentleman that it was a salesman's sample. A gun that a salesman would have brought around to shops to see what the general feeling/interest was for the gun.
The gentleman I purchased it from no longer worked for Colt.
He had purchased it at was known as the Colt Employee only Christmas Sale many years ago.
I asked him what that was and he told me that Colt sold off their odds and ends at Christmas time.
They (COLT) would send out a list to employees and the employees had an opportunity to purchase dealer demos and salesman samples that they wanted out of their inventory. The list was very basic and only showed the item name, serial number and finish for the most part.
The guns were sold as used guns and at a discount as most didn't have boxes and so forth.
He handed me a copy of the Colt Christmas sale paperwork confirming that the 2-tone Python was on the list and that the serial numbers matched that on the list.
After I purchased the gun from him, I later had ordered a factory historical letter from Colt.
When I finally got my letter, it confirmed that the Python was indeed purchased at Christmas time from the employee I had got it from. The dates and names matched, however, the letter stated is shipped out as a blued 6 inch Python and not a 2-tone gun. I called Beverly at Colt to ask about the gun and letter.
Beverly was very nice and had told me that Colt never produced a 2-tone Python.
I explained to her that my Python was a 2-tone gun and that it was purchased through the Colt Christmas sale and that the Christmas sale paperwork stated it was a nickel & blued gun with the proper serial numbers.
Beverly then stated that now that was possible and that the Historical department didn't always show things that the custom department did. She explained that the gun could have been done up as a salesman sample and that her paperwork didn't show it. She also told me that the historical department didn't have any of the Christmas sale paperwork through the years.
She told me that my paperwork and documentation was better than what she had on file.
I'm telling you guys this so that if you do find something odd and it does not letter, that the historical letter is NOT the end all be all. Document what you can, the best you can.



Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 

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I was thinking about doing that with one of my shooters but with polished stainless. Nickel and I do not get along. Those remind me a bit of the old S&W Pinto Revolvers. Always thought it was a classy touch
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have a Diamondback that is done the same as yours. Do you suppose it could be a Christmas revolver also?
FYI: They are not and were not done for Christmas, they were done as a salesman sample to see what gun shops and the public reaction was. Only a couple were made. If you have no documentation, you may never know.
I have the serial numbers of the Pythons that were sold at the employee sale. I don't recall any mention of any D-backs being done like that.
Remember, anyone can have their Colt sent back to the custom shop and have it done in any way they want.
If it was not documented though, all you have is a 2-tone Colt.

Good luck, Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 

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Really nice guns. I have several S&W revolvers in what was referred to as "Black & White" back in the early 70's. They were special ordered with nickle frames and blued cylinders and vice-versa.
 

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Early this year I bought a 1964 Colt Cobra that is a "Pinto". Obviously,not a factory job but it is some type of hard chromed barrel and cylinder[the seller was not a gun dealer and had no knowledge of who,what ,when or where.The frame shows minimal use but close inspection of the cylinder shows some evidence of "pitting" or "dropped on concrete" damage. I'm guessing the gun was put up in a wet holster or went through the dropped scenario.The plating is blast or brush finish making the damage almost impossible to see.The barrel has no damage and the roll marks are perfect, almost belying a re-finish. The fascinating thing to me is, the brave 'smith that removed the steel barrel from the alloy frame did the blasting and put it back together. The front sight registers perfectly and the frame shows absolutely no warping or disfigurement.Many 'smiths won't touch an alloy frame gun for barrel R&R so, my hat is off to the gent that did this work. I wish I knew who he was. One last thing, I am a .45 auto man,through and through,and have never been comfortable with .38 SPL for defense but this little booger is dead bang accurate and is growing more in my favor each day. Nick
 

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I had a colt mk3 which was nickel with gold hammer,trigger and cylinder latch but it also had the floots gold plated. It was new and had never been fired. I purchased it like that and was told it was original. But my youth got the best of me and I ended up selling the gun since I thought there is no way colt would have done that. Oh well such as life.
 
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