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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
NEW OLD COLT OWNER
What does the Colt Revolver become after it leaves the factory with 3 US proof marks... All marks, US and British are on left side of frame.
The serial # at the crane (68xxx)
7
then
1 at the front of the trigger guard, VP inside a triangle the
2nd at the rear of the trigger guard, the number 3
3rd on the frame under the grips, capital letter E

And 5 British proof marks...
1. On the breech area, the rear of the cylinder, are I think inspection and acceptance markings
2. On the left rear of the frame (just below the hammer). Broad arrow government acceptance mark on top.
3. Under that is a Crown
4. Then under that is F9
E
5. The cylinder also has inspection/acceptance mark on it facing to the rear

It also has Bone Grips that appear to be original. There is a #7 penciled on the inside of the grips that "seem" to correspond with the #7 stamped under the factory serial #.
Also there are no markings on the frame at the butt by the Lanyard Swivel as US Service Revolvers have.

Barrel was modified at some point to a 8 1/2" smooth bore

Any help in deciphering just what I have would be greatly appreciated!

View attachment 430714 20171112_194326.jpg 20171112_114920.jpg 20171112_114551.jpg 20171120_112251.jpg

Thanks in Advance!
 

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The 'broad arrow' indicates British military ownership. The 'crossed pennants' mark was common of WW1 era private purchase revolvers, but beats me what it means here. I am interested in seeing the mystery unraveled. Not likely it started off as smoothbore with stag grips, It has what looks like an Enfield military proof mark, but it also does not seem to have all the commercial British proofs that got stamped on them after WW2 when the most of them were surplussed.
 

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The 'Crossed Pennants' are another piece of the inspection - 'Sold From Stores' marks look like ><.

What you have is someone's surplus revolver project built on a WWI contract New Service - nothing 'military', beyond the convenient platform to build on and nothing 'factory' at all.

Thousands of good service revolvers that are now collectable suffered the same fate, but when this was done, these didn't bring $35.
 

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The crossed pennants are British government acceptance marks, and the Crown/F9/E are Enfield inspection marks. The rest of the history was removed when the barrel was changed.

The VP is Colt's internal proof/acceptance mark, and the 3 on the back of the trigger guard identifies the Colt final inspector.

I certainly don't know the law, but I think the shot barrel classifies the weapon as "Any Other Weapon" under the NFA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input....just trying to get an idea of what it all ads up to....
I don't look gift horse's in the mouth!
Thanks again!
 

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Look 'carefully' down the barrel.

If it's truly smoothbore, it 'may' have been built prior to the Gun Control Act of 1934.

This means nothing - other than to provide context with a different era - and it would be illegal.

That said, a scribed line of 'rifling' has saved a number of otherwise collectable guns from being cut up.

It may have been done this way for snakes - or aerial target shooting - there's no rhyme or reason 'why' guys modify guns.

You could search for the appropriate rifled barrel and have it installed - they're out there.
 

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It appears the cylinder was modified to fire 45 colt. And it will still fire 455. If you take the stag grips off, you may see a large "E" for England. This gun was probably one of many sent to the British forces from 1914-17.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes I have taken the grips off....There is an "E" stamped on the frame.
And the grips have a #7 pensiled in on them.
There is a #7 stamped "under" the serial # also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
It is definitely a smooth bore.... had no intention of keeping it this way. Currently looking for a period correct 5.5 inch barrel.

That being said.... do you know what might have been the reasoning behind scoring around the "Outside" of barrel 1 1/2" back from the tip ?

That's got me puzzled!!
20171121_050043.jpg
 

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Almost assuredly the correct barrel for your gun will be marked 455 Webley. Since this gun appears to be altered for 45 Colt ( have your tried a cartridge to see if it chambers and the cylinder rotates?), you can also use a barrel marked 45 colt or even a barrel from a 1917 revolver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As of now I haven't....some time in the next week or so I plan on geting it thoroughly cleaned up and take'n some measurements.
 

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Originally, it was a .455 Colt New Service built for and sold to the British in 1914 for service in WWI.

They were supplanting their Webleys and expanding their arsenal in anticipation of need.

Beyond filling that order and arriving at the shipping dock, Colt won't have a clue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the info....now the wait's over.
I was kind of thinking it was.
At least I know more now than I did when I started..
Thanks again
 

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The crossed pennants are in fact the British military marking to show that the weapon has passed a military proof. The military used this mark in WW1 and through WW2 right through to the 1980's and beyond. I have seen several Ingram MAC 10's in 9mm with this mark electric penciled on the bolt, in the reserve collection of several British military museums.

The Enfield mark is an inspection mark, if this is in conjunction with the broad arrow this serves as an acceptance mark as well.

Regards

AlanD
Sydney
 

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The British Purchasing Commission was a WWII organization. It was originally the British and the French, but when France was taken by the Nazis it became the British Purchasing Commission and was based in New York for the purchase of all types of goods needed in the war.


 
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