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Found this Colt 1855 "Root" at a gun show in Lakeland, Florida. When we walked into the show a gentleman asked where we were from. When I told him Arkansas, he said he would have a gun for me the next day.
This factory engraved Model 1855 Colt Root revolver was made in 1855. It is a .28 caliber. The ivory grips match the other numbers on the pistol. On the grips you will see the name JRH Scott. It is for Confederate Captain John R. Homer Scott, 1st Battalion Arkansas Cavalry. He also served as 1st Lt in the Mexican War. Captain Scott is from a prominent Arkansas family with roots in Missouri. His father, Honorable Andrew Scott was appointed United States Judge, of the Territory of Arkansas. Judge Scott brought the family to Arkansas (Pope County-Russellville) in 1819 at the organization of the Territory. I have a lot of information on the family including a dual which was fought between Judge Scott and Judge Joseph Seldon. The dual was fought on an island in the Mississippi River near Helena, Arkansas. Judge Scott was unhurt. Judge Seldon died.


 

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Beautiful, you never cease to amaze with the guns you find. Do you know why the issue the two Judges were trying to settle with the duel?
 

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A Magnificent Historical Artifact From the Confederacy of Southern States (1861-1865)...with provenance to a true warrior and his patriotic family.

I stand in awe Sir...!!






Map of the Division of the States Involved in the American Civil War (1861—1865)



Blue indicates the Northern Union states.

Light Blue represents five Union states that permitted slavery (border states).

Red represents Southern seceded states in rebellion of northern aggression... also known as the Confederate States of America.

Grey areas were U.S. territories, with the exception of the Indian Territory (later Oklahoma).


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beautiful, you never cease to amaze with the guns you find. Do you know why the issue the two Judges were trying to settle with the duel?
Both judges were on the territorial bench as judges of the Superior Court and had a dispute. I don't remember the cause. On June 18. 1828 Judge Scott had another encounter which ended in the death of General E. Hogan. Hogan was a big man weighing over 270 pounds. They say he had herculean strength. Judge Scott weighed around 130. Hogan attacked the judge and when Judge Scott regained his feet, he pulled his sword (which was a gift from Major William Ball) and inflicted four wounds. Before Hogan died, he took the sword from Judge Scott and stabbed him through the neck. Judge Scott survived and immediately surrendered to the US Marshall. His case was examined in the proper court and discharged. The killing was ruled justified.
 

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Randy.
Congratulations on finding a real treasure. It would make a fine one gun display at the upcoming CCA in Frisco. Factory engraved with ivory and a most interesting history.
 

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WOWSERS !!!!!! Love it and the great history. Thanks for sharing it with us here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Forgot I had posted this one earlier. It is an interesting piece. Thanks for resurrecting my old original post.
 
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