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Mike,

That's AWESOME!! Even the ivories are matching #!

Supposedly not chambered in 44 RF until 1880. This one changes the books. Or was it 44 American since it's stamped 44 Cal. instead of 44 RF and converted to 44 RF?

Is it #16 in the 44 RF serial # range or one of the 6 reported in the regular SAA serial # range?

Does it have a pinched frame rear sight?

Perhaps the one that didn't go to Mexico! Not with those names on it.

One inscription reads 187?, WHAT'S THE LAST DIGIT, a 3? Not a fast mover, that's for sure.

Can you post a photo with hammer cocked to show the rim fire firing pin?

Had it long? Where did you dig that one up?

What are the paper wedges behind the cyl for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The 44 Rimfire series were built in 1875 to 1876 and were very slow sellers some being returned to the factory several times due to them not selling so they will letter well into the 1880s. The Kopec book has a lot of good information but the Wilkerson Hoyt book gives some history of sales by looking at the factory records. This one will not letter as there is record of it in the books. The date inside the grips looks like 1876 to me. 1800 some guns were built in their own serial number range with the last 100 or so being converted to 22 rimfire. I first saw this gun maybe 30 years ago when it came into the shop for a few questions. It then went back home with the owner. It then came back a couple of years ago for sale as the former owner had passed away. It came with a very worn holster and belt, nothing fancy. I don't know what you are seeing a paper wedges, maybe the background through the cylinder gap? The markings on the gun are 100 percent correct for a 44 rimfire. It looks like every piece is original to the gun.

IMG_0544.JPG IMG_0546.JPG IMG_0564.JPG IMG_0566.JPG
 

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Mike,
thank you for the story and the additional photos, very interesting. Makes one wonder if it was in the deceased gentleman's family all its life. Was his surname either of the two names on the gun?

With standard rear V sight it's clearly in the 44 RF serial range.

This is the photo but now I see on closer inspection at full size, that's apparently the side of the flat firing pin:



Thanks for sharing that one!
 

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One of the neatest guns we've seen here in a while I think. Quite the treasure. Thanks!





Thought it interesting that even on an original gun that is this early (1876?) they were at times using glue in spacers for the ivory.

 

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Just my opinion, but the engraved name on the backstrap looks like W. C. Scott. That was the name of the company in England that made shotguns. Maybe the SAA was special order to that company/owner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The name and initials on the backstrap are definitely W P Scott The P is a very odd shaped letter and it takes a glass to see it clearly. At first glance and maybe even 2 or 3rd it will seem like a C but upon close examination it can only be a P. Since this gun does not letter there is always the fact that it could be a New York Nickel and Ivory gun gun. Out of the 1700 or so 44 rimfires only a couple of hundred were factory nickeled. It is a shame there is no history to accompany this gun. The shop this walked into is just a small shop on the eastern part of Maryland. Here is a link to what walked in on Friday of this week! You will be very pleasantly amazed!

https://www.thefirearmsforum.com/th...ded-winchester-73-deluxe.177244/#post-1632327
 

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Hi There,

The name and initials on the backstrap are definitely W P Scott The P is a very odd shaped letter and it takes a glass to see it clearly. At first glance and maybe even 2 or 3rd it will seem like a C but upon close examination it can only be a P. Since this gun does not letter there is always the fact that it could be a New York Nickel and Ivory gun gun. Out of the 1700 or so 44 rimfires only a couple of hundred were factory nickeled. It is a shame there is no history to accompany this gun. The shop this walked into is just a small shop on the eastern part of Maryland. Here is a link to what walked in on Friday of this week! You will be very pleasantly amazed!

https://www.thefirearmsforum.com/th...ded-winchester-73-deluxe.177244/#post-1632327
WOW! That is a great piece! Is it for sale and how much?
I LOVE old Winchesters and the '73 is a particular favorite
of mine. The $15,000 is a reasonable guess (I cannot estimate
any closer without a personal inspection). Where in MD is it?

A very fine old girl! I'm interested!!!

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The Winchester is Sold either to my coworker or myself. It will get no further. I posted it there for Bert, he is a former Cody Historian / Curator. The man when it comes to Winchesters.
 

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Hi There,

The Winchester is Sold either to my coworker or myself. It will get no further. I posted it there for Bert, he is a former Cody Historian / Curator. The man when it comes to Winchesters.
You're just a tease. I hope you don't cheat the Lady.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb
 

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Dang! That is some 73. Congrads to who ever becomes the newest owner.

Since this gun does not letter there is always the fact that it could be a New York Nickel and Ivory gun..
My thoughts exactly with the spacer on the ivory. Really nice gun. Would have been a wonderful gun to shoot bitd. If I was living in 1876 it and a '66 to match would have been a pair of guns I'd have wanted. That would have changed again in '77. But in '76 the pair would have been some serious armament.
 
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