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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Could the frame be Colt? Also, is there an assembly number under the frame (inside the gun) that matches any on the inside of the loading gate?

Only numbers that match are on the barrel and frame. The loading gate did have a number at some time, but cant tell what it is. Looking more like a mexican copy...
20210508_115919.jpg
 

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I just looked through my IILUSTRATED ENCLCLOPEIDA OF HANDGUNS and didn't see any thing like this, other then the Colt, which this isn't.
It certainly doesn't look machine made but as we know Belgium as well as Spain were notorious for the plethora of copies of US handguns.
 

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Mexico, ca. 1890-1920. I had an example of one of these in .44-40 many years ago, very cool late frontier revolvers. Also, anything produced by Colt would not fit...
Keep it as is as an interesting object from a very turbulent time in the American SW around the turn of the last century.
 

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Here is the sunburst Republic of Mexico mark on an old 1875 Remington. It is the same mark on the cylinder of the OP's gun. It is possible I guess that the Mexican Army would have used such a crude weapon as the OP's gun, but I still believe the cylinder came from a "real" Colt SAA that was owned by the Government of Mexico. It's condition is much worse than the gun itself which to me reinforces the idea that the cylinder is not original to that gun.Thanks.

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What is the purpose of the cylinder rear face peen marks between each chamber? It looks like they were intended to prevent a correct diameter cartridge from being inserted. An early way of deactivation, perhaps?
 

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The thickness or lack thereof of those cylinder walls is pretty scary. I think GRI has nailed it regarding the manufacturer, but I have seen better worksmanship on some of the Khyber Pass hand made copies of guns.
 

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I agree with Walter Rego that the chambers look way oversize for that cylinder. I can't see enough spacing between them to even chamber two rimmed cartridges.
 

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What is the purpose of the cylinder rear face peen marks between each chamber? It looks like they were intended to prevent a correct diameter cartridge from being inserted. An early way of deactivation, perhaps?
I think they are dents caused by the firing pin hitting between the chambers.
 

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The thickness or lack thereof of those cylinder walls is pretty scary. I think GRI has nailed it regarding the manufacturer, but I have seen better worksmanship on some of the Khyber Pass hand made copies of guns.
That is an issue conflicting with my earlier posts. I originally speculated the "44" was the caliber but, either the overall diameter of the cylinder is smaller or the chambers larger....there should be more 'meat' there if it is a Colt cylinder. There is a number on the periphery of the cylinder which would not be there if the cylinder had been reduced in diameter. Or, the number was applied after the cylinder was reduced. As pointed out earlier the maker of the cylinder really doesn't make a difference at this point as the gun is a relic. It is an interesting piece though with the various and variety of numbers etc. on the parts. Regards.
 

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I might consider one firing pin impact if the timing could even be off that much and still consistently index the cylinder. But six impacts with no cartridges loaded may be stretching it a little.
 

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Long ago I saw a double action revolver of foreign make that was peened between the chambers very much like this one.
I only got a brief look, but it had some unfired cartridges that were smaller then the chambers.

The peens allowed the smaller cartridges to be sort of supported and "fired"?? in the larger caliber gun.
This was clearly a Third World attempt to keep a gun working even though correct ammo was not available.
People in these types of countries will do strange and unsafe things to have a gun.
 

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I'll say a few things here, none of which will contribute to anyone's knowledge about this ol' revolver.

First, welcome to the Colt Forum. And what a great way to begin your membership! Such an interesting thread, and with enough well done photographs so that all the knowledgeable members here can really see what's being talked about and to state well-informed opinions.

I don't believe anyone's mentioned the grips yet? Smile. Not exactly what we think of as checkered, are they? But they took a bit of hand work, I think. The lines are straight and the design is well-spaced. And take a look at that grip screw!

Lots of folks would say that gun and its condition don't merit a second look. But it sure sparked an interesting discussion, and brought to light some things that a lot of people, myself included, didn't know about.

Post #16 here hits the nail on the head for me. I wouldn't mind being "stuck" with that gun, myself. And kudos to the OP for hanging on to it for so long.
 

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No offense, but the gun was originally a decent gun, not up to Colt standards, but after over 125 years of being rode hard, I would not judge it so harshly. I would add that the border at the time was more on paper than reality. Guns of this type often ended up with banditos who mistakenly plied there trade across the border. It could even have turned up in Brownsville later.
 
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I'll say a few things here, none of which will contribute to anyone's knowledge about this ol' revolver.

First, welcome to the Colt Forum. And what a great way to begin your membership! Such an interesting thread, and with enough well done photographs so that all the knowledgeable members here can really see what's being talked about and to state well-informed opinions.

I don't believe anyone's mentioned the grips yet? Smile. Not exactly what we think of as checkered, are they? But they took a bit of hand work, I think. The lines are straight and the design is well-spaced. And take a look at that grip screw!

Lots of folks would say that gun and its condition don't merit a second look. But it sure sparked an interesting discussion, and brought to light some things that a lot of people, myself included, didn't know about.

Post #16 here hits the nail on the head for me. I wouldn't mind being "stuck" with that gun, myself. And kudos to the OP for hanging on to it for so long.
It really interesting to hear everyone's comments and questions. The wood the grips are made out of was once beautiful. Have know idea what type of wood, but additional pics added.

20210607_222616.jpg
20210607_222550.jpg
 

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Jim, I am having trouble visualizing how the cylinder would rotate with the hammer down. In that case I would also expect the damage to be from a lateral wiping action with the displaced material predominately in one chamber. The cylinder picture shows what looks (to me anyway) to be a vertical impact from some type of punch that displaced material into both chambers. Please realize that my question comes from only observing a properly functioning SAA.
 

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Not that I am a ”smith,” but in my opinion the problem with the cylinder was caused by a combination of bad cylinder timing and FANNING the poor gun. If they do it in a movie, don’t try it at home.
 
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