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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Long ago I saw a double action revolver of foreign make that was peened between the chambers very much like this one.
I only got a brief look, but it had some unfired cartridges that were smaller then the chambers.

The peens allowed the smaller cartridges to be sort of supported and "fired"?? in the larger caliber gun.
This was clearly a Third World attempt to keep a gun working even though correct ammo was not available.
People in these types of countries will do strange and unsafe things to have a gun.
I was able to find some 45 LC to see how they fit in the cylinder. I was only able to find two chambers that would except the 45 LC. See pic below...not much metal in between the two and the cylinder wall. Kinda crazy to think it even could with stand black powder rounds back in the day.
20210608_211708.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
That is an issue conflicting with my earlier posts. I originally speculated the "44" was the caliber but, either the overall diameter of the cylinder is smaller or the chambers larger....there should be more 'meat' there if it is a Colt cylinder. There is a number on the periphery of the cylinder which would not be there if the cylinder had been reduced in diameter. Or, the number was applied after the cylinder was reduced. As pointed out earlier the maker of the cylinder really doesn't make a difference at this point as the gun is a relic. It is an interesting piece though with the various and variety of numbers etc. on the parts. Regards.
I was under the impression that only Colt did the cylinder bushing and the copys had no such thing?
20210608_211651.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
No offense, but the gun was originally a decent gun, not up to Colt standards, but after over 125 years of being rode hard, I would not judge it so harshly. I would add that the border at the time was more on paper than reality. Guns of this type often ended up with banditos who mistakenly plied there trade across the border. It could even have turned up in Brownsville later.
No offense, i think its cool to hear everyones questions and comments. Ive obtained more information in the last 3 to 4 days then I had in the last 15 years.
 

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I think the firing pin protrudes to the point that it contacts the cylinder anytime it is rotated. The marks appear to have been made over a long period of time to me. FP rubbing enough to allow the cylinder to turn causing the wear. The more I look at it, the more I think the cylinder may actually be a factory Colt cylinder. There is so much damage, corrosion, and pitting that it makes it difficult to be sure.
 
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I think the firing pin protrudes to the point that it contacts the cylinder anytime it is rotated. The marks appear to have been made over a long period of time to me. FP rubbing enough to allow the cylinder to turn causing the wear. The more I look at it, the more I think the cylinder may actually be a factory Colt cylinder. There is so much damage, corrosion, and pitting that it makes it difficult to be sure.
The firing pin won't contact the cyl when it's rotated because u move the hammer back to rotate the cyl & the cyl won't turn w/the hammer down.
 

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The firing pin won't contact the cyl when it's rotated because u move the hammer back to rotate the cyl & the cyl won't turn w/the hammer down.
Thanks Jim. You are correct as always . I had the part about the cylinder not always locking with the hammer back on my mind. Brain fart !
 

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I was able to find some 45 LC to see how they fit in the cylinder. I was only able to find two chambers that would except the 45 LC. See pic below...not much metal in between the two and the cylinder wall. Kinda crazy to think it even could with stand black powder rounds back in the day. View attachment 740974
That metal in the cylinder walls has been pounded many many times from the overly LONG firing Pin. It displaced metal to move into the Cylinder walls You can trim it down and reshape it. I would use a half round file and work slowly until all cylinders ACCEPT a Cartridge. and then maybe polish with a small rubber Diamond dust Dremel.
 

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That metal in the cylinder walls has been pounded many many times from the overly LONG firing Pin. It displaced metal to move into the Cylinder walls You can trim it down and reshape it. I would use a half round file and work slowly until all cylinders ACCEPT a Cartridge. and then maybe polish with a small rubber Diamond dust Dremel.
Why? Would you seriously try to shoot this gun? Just leave it alone and enjoy its history .
 

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Why? Would you seriously try to shoot this gun? Just leave it alone and enjoy its history .
Who said SHOOT it?? He tried putting (Looks like loaded Cartridges) in the cylinder. Only Two fit. I would make it so it could Hold all 6. Even use just dummy loaded cartridges. Why Not?? I Never said I'd Shoot it, just fix it. Wall hangers don't have to be as found, they can be functional and decorative at the same time.
 
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