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Discussion Starter #1
The front sight on my recent Colt find made in 1906 in 38WCF appears to have been filled down considerably. It shoots some 6" high at 10 steps. Is there a cheap and easy way to build it back up so it shoots to point of aim?

700855
 

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Will let the 'smiths answer as to the sight. In the meantime, if you load, you might be able to use lighter bullets (.40 S&W 155/165 grain) which will impact lower.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm loading a cast Lee 401-175TC loaded with Grafs FFg and filler. I use same load in rifle so over all length is a consideration.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just a low amp, fine line of weld will make it look perfect with some filing.
Don’t use stainless or else cold blue won’t stick.
You ain't seen my weld! Bad even old farmer standards.

Any tips on trying to heat sink the area around the blade?

I was thinking a chunk of copper with a slip fit slot to push over the sight blade. Or make a copper bushing to fit over the end of the barrel with a slot to press aginst the base of the blade?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Fill the case with b.p. to the base of the bullet. No filler.
My main occupation is Cowboy Action Shooting. Can't kill a steel target any deader with more power. 1cc of black powder is the minimum per SASS standards. Compressed full loads are pretty stout. The people running the match get tired of resetting targets knocked down with "warthog" loads.

I have a Cimarron Model P old model in 38WCF that shoots POA with these loads. Don't laugh at the grips, I made them by casting rein. Used a steak knife to cut in fake cracks. I need to add another notch for another "clean" match.

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I've seen one gunsmith mill the front sight out and then press another in it's place that is the proper size for the caliber and year of manf. He did it that way to preserve the blue on the barrel from welding. It looked very slick and if he hadn't told me he did it I don't think I would have noticed it. Pretty seamless.
 

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I am finally having my 1909 SAA front site fixed. Mr. Jim Cornwall is replacing mine. He makes a copy of the first gen site. He explained to me the differences between welding, soldering, and using gunsmith solder etc. . Once I get my shooting iron back I will post before and after pics.
 

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I’ve found those sights are next to impossible to get out on those 1st Gens, so my solution has been to file them right down to the barrel and mill the old base out.
It makes sense because the milling only needs to be the same size as the new base going in. Then I shape a new front sight and pressure fit the base into the wedge and use the appropriate solder. On a no finish gun like your 38/40 this method works perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
701007


The short sighted Colt is on left. A Cimarron Model P old model in 38WCF center in center and second generation Colt SAA in 45Colt 71 vantage is on right. Looks like the Model P has about the size and height I'll need.

How's this idea strike you? Take a chunk of stock like pictured and cut off about an inch, cut a notch to fit the contour of the short sight. Then see if my TIG welding neighbor can weld the two parts together. Then adjust point of aim and profile.

There is about 80 thousands differences in heigh from the short sight to the one on the Model P. I'm thinking that would be a lot to build up with weld.
 

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Precision welding on an extension to the sight would work well, depending on the skill of the welder.
The trick is to get the extension on straight and not tilted in any direction, and to leave no seam once the filing is done.

If it's done slowly with cooling time between beads, just welding up the sight also works.
Sort of 6 of one, half a dozen of the other.

As part of the heat sink or just as protection for the surrounding metal, make a shield that covers everything but the actual sight itself.

For heat protection, as above allowing plenty of cooling time between beads, and use of a copper heat sink and some "Heat Stop" paste from Brownell's will provide adequate protection.
But the best method is taking time to do it in small stages with cooling time between.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Precision welding on an extension to the sight would work well, depending on the skill of the welder.

[QUOTE="dfariswheel, post: 3191522,

My neighbor is now an engineer at the local nuclear power plant. He worked his way through college as a welder. Before moving on to professional engineering work, he was a welding trainer. He still has a love of welding and has all sorts of metal work equipment. He has welded a couple of parts for me - one building up a warn spot on a carrier in an antique Winchester 1887 shotgun (first year production). And more recently, repaired a crack in the hammer on this same gun.

In the first minute of this video, I show the hammer that he repaired the crack that I made knocking out the old cam. I'm happy with his work.

 

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You ain't seen my weld! Bad even old farmer standards.

Any tips on trying to heat sink the area around the blade?

I was thinking a chunk of copper with a slip fit slot to push over the sight blade. Or make a copper bushing to fit over the end of the barrel with a slot to press aginst the base of the blade?
Find someone that can TIG weld properly.
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Find someone that can TIG weld properly.
Dennis
Well, I know Lever Action Bill could and would do the job. He's rebuilt two Colt hammers for me and one he installed in the gun and adjusted the action. But he's a two day drive one way or go through the agony of shipping. Besides, he's likely covered with work.

Next time I see my neighbor that can TIG weld, I'll see if he thinks he's willing to give it a try.
 
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