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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
i bought a colt saa 44 army the gun has only had a couple rounds threw it very tight. the guy who owned it quick drawed it a couple hundred times has bad holster wear. little pitting on cylinder not real bad. should i reblue it or keep the way it is. it is from 1973 checked serial number to verify.
 

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According to Wilkerson, the 2nd Generation .44 Special chambered SAA was only produced from 1958 to 1966. In the 2nd Generation, .44/40 was only chambered in the 1975 Peacemaker Centennial. Something doesn't add up.
 

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The 2nd Generation SAAs were produced until 1975. I would suspect a re-barrel and re-chamber of a .357 2nd Generation SAA.
 

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i thought it was second gen my mistake. it was built in 1973 so must be third gen. i dont know much about it as i said i just bought it
Short answer yes, no reason not to have refinished because it appears to have little originality. "IF" by someone who specializes in Colt SAAs, or it could come back looking worse!

Also, have the action checked out before committing money to a re-finish. Quick draw even w/o ammo is a lot harder on the action parts then shooting it with live ammo. It's actually abuse in a gun not modified for quick draw.
 

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I would clean it, oil it, shoot it as is. refinish adds nothing to a shooter and a shooter should have character imho. If you refinish it you will be less apt to put it in a holster again, which would be a shame. You will most likely also zip tie the hammer so that it wont get a turn line. Nothing wrong with pretty as long as you are willing to live with making it not so pretty in the future through use. Light it up and enjoy it
 

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Jeez, this is the second thread in as many days about wanting to refinish a slightly worn 2nd gen SAA.

It kinda comes down to what you want to do with it; if you want a shooter (and to me, most any SAA is a shooter) leave it as is and shoot the heck out of it. If you want shinny looker, sell it to someone who will use it and buy a NIB 3rd gen; LOTS of them out there. With the possible caliber switch, you have a gun that already has a somewhat compromised value, if you refinish it the value will drop even more. Most (but probably not all) collectors/accumulators avoid refinished guns unless they are rare or the price is so low that they can't pass it up. Obviously it's your gun and you can do what you want, but you posted the question here, so my advice: Don't Refinish.

Best regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i dont know how anyone got 357 out of my post. it IS all original and it is a 44 special single action army colt. all the action of the gun is tight only real problem is the blueing wear. i tried to post pic must be to big jpeg wont allow me to post it.
 

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Keep it as is. You will use and enjoy it more. I have a SAA NIB and it is useless except as an investment. I don't recall the last time I even saw it.
I am going through cancer treatment and reassessing my priorities. Giving the kids the things I want them to have and pondering shooting the guns which have been safe queens a long time.
Like my 4 inch Python the second one I owned and have never fired one.
I did shoot my stainless Mitchel Arms American made Luger though.
I sold my Browning High power which was LNIB and picked up a shooter a long time ago it is now history as well.
So keep the 44 as is and shoot and enjoy it.
Just my opinion.
Steve in Wisconsin
 

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I wouldn't pay $350 or whatever to get it re-casehardened and blued. That's paying to lower the value of it. The finish wear sounds minimal. But I prefer blue worn guns to new shiny ones anyway so I'm biased. How long is the barrel and does it in fact say .44 special?
 

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I've got a 7 1/2 .44 spcl that I won in the 1960 Calif. state championship w/the backstrap engraved w/the title on it,I've worn the blueing completely off the bkstrp & almost all of it on the trgstrp,the left side of the front of the bbl. & the right side of the ejector housing has no blueing & I'm proud of all the wear I've put on it & would NEVER re-blue it.As soon as I got it home I tuned the action & I'm still shooting it,it has over 100,000 rds.thru it,w/only one mainspring replacement,[it got tired] the rest of the parts are the ones that came in it so u can see why I'm proud of it as is so don't worry about refinishing yours,just shoot it as is & I hope u get as much enjoyment out of yours as I've had shooting mine.John Taffin featured it in one of his Colt books along w/some of my other Colts.
 

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It depends solely on you and nobody else can answer for you. For me, it depends. If it was my father's or grandfather's old Colt that had been carried and used for years and years and showed the kind of tender loving wear only honest use can provide, I wouldn't refinish it. If the sixgun was procured second hand and the wear was from an unknown source, I would certainly consider refinishing. If the wear appeared to be from less than reasonable care, I would certainly consider refinishing. If the sixgun was less than what I wanted, I would make it right. I really don't care what anyone in the unforeseen future thinks it's worth. Life is short, do what makes you happy. If it were me, I'd strongly consider Turnbull's pre-war finish. Bevel that cylinder, perhaps install a dovetail front sight, color case harden the frame/gate/hammer and carbona blue the rest.

Or you might want to have a little more done.

Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Gun accessory
 

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i dont know how anyone got 357 out of my post. it IS all original and it is a 44 special single action army colt. all the action of the gun is tight only real problem is the blueing wear. i tried to post pic must be to big jpeg wont allow me to post it.
The 357 is speculation because according to the authorities Colt did not manufacture a 44 Special SAA in 1973. Therefore, since it's currently chambered for 44 Special, it had to be converted from some other caliber, most likely 357 because that caliber is less popular than 45 Colt. Your SAA looks all original because if a conversion is properly done, there's no way to tell that there was a caliber change, short of obtaining a letter from Colt.

Shoot it, enjoy it, leave it as is.

Best regards,

My opinion is free, and worth every penny of it.
 

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Exactly as Monsai52 noted. If the .357 cylinder is bored to .44 Special the cylinder will still number to the gun. In 1973 Colt was only chambering the SAA in .357 and .45 Colt. The easiest way to get a 1973 .44 Special SAA would be to re-barrel and re-chamber. This would explains how you have a 1973 SAA in .44 Special that looks correct.
 

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In reading the posts about when the .44 spcl. wasn't being made I remember seeing that statement made before but I have to disagree w/it.I have 2 unfired 7 1/2" blue c/c .44 spcls in my collection,one was made in either '72 or '73 the other was made in either '76 or '77 i'd have to dig them out to see which year,one of them has the white plastic box,no outer cover & no box for the other one,I think they must have been special ordered which is not beyond possibility.I'm pretty sure John Taffin featured both of them in one of his books,one of the books was nothing but .44 cal's so that may be the one.
 
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