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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hello, new member. saw this pistol in a shop and wanted to seek out the opinions of other colt enthusiasts on its condition. does it look original to you? whats up with the stamp on the barrel chamber, and the (what appears to be) british crown stamp in several locations seen in the pictures i took? thanks! -Nick

also-im not sure that the magazine is correct for this pistol, but im not familiar with specifics on a ww2 contract ace. it is a solid color, if im remembering correctly, it was a matte finish. i think it had service model ace stamped on the floor plate but thats going off memory and im not sure of it.




 

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Finish appears to be the original Parko-Lubrite. The markings on the slide, receiver, and barrel are London Proof House British commercial proofs applied after 1954. From your description the magazine sounds correct, but the body should be a dull blue.

The stock on the right side could be a Keyes instead of a Colt. If a Keyes it will have a K in a star in addition to a one or two digit number on the back. If so easy replacement.
 

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Nice gun, if the asking price is reasonable to you buy it. I have an early blued one, but I would love to add a parko-lubrite finished one to the collection. More pics please!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
is there a recorded history of these trainer pistols having been send to england as some sort of lend-lease? supposedly a british officer who was stationed over here in the US at pearl harbor had this pistol in his possesion, but of course thats just story passed on by word of mouth and information can get skewed etc... over time and as its passed along.
 

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The Service Model Ace was manufactured in August/September 1945, and President Truman quickly ended Lend-Lease almost as soon as the war ended.

Production of the SMA had ended in late 1942, and didn't resume until April of 1945. Most of the late production SMA's went to the Navy, with the last shipment gong to Springfield Armory in September of 1945. If the SMA shown was shipped in August it went to the Navy, and if in September it went to Springfield Armory and would not have been Lend-Lease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
ok, thank you for the specifics! so theoretically, how would it have come to had the london aresnal stamps on it?
possibility that it went to someone in the navy who wound up stationed in england, and somehow the pistol wound up staying in an english armory until being discharged, sold, and making its way back here?

i suppose if it went to the navy, there is a chance that the story of the british officer being stationed over here and having it could be true as well, again in theory, and if hed somehow been able to take it back to england it would have eventually wound up with the proof marks, or something?

again supposedly, the previous owner of the pistol was given a small pamphlet that somebody had printed up in regards to this specific pistol, containing a bunch of back ground information that they had acquired either through information handed down, or through research, but was unfortunately lost during a move. so the story goes...
 

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Good Looking Colt you have there. I would be proud to own it, even with some of it not quite being original.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Good Looking Colt you have there. I would be proud to own it, even with some of it not quite being original.
thank you for the comment! besides the possible mismatched grip panel, and probably the magazine, are there any other parts that are apparent in the pictures already posted to be non-original? thanks for the info guys! still wondering about the British connection...
 

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The earliest it could have been proofed in England was in 1955 which gives it a long time span in which it could have been proofed. It could have been purchased most anywhere by a British arms merchant, returned to England, and had to be proofed before it could be sold commercially.

Some of the Colt 1911A1 pistols that were Lend-Leased to Canada in 1943 were sold to an arms merchant after WWII and shipped to England. In England they were commercially proofed to be sold, and some were returned to the U.S. market.

It is not unusual to find Korean War era M1 Rifles with British commercial proofs. The rifles were purchased somewhere over the globe, shipped to England, and proofed to be put on the commercial market.

Being produced at the end of the war or even after the war ended probably reduces any military connection with the British commercial proofs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The earliest it could have been proofed in England was in 1955 which gives it a long time span in which it could have been proofed. It could have been purchased most anywhere by a British arms merchant, returned to England, and had to be proofed before it could be sold commercially.

Some of the Colt 1911A1 pistols that were Lend-Leased to Canada in 1943 were sold to an arms merchant after WWII and shipped to England. In England they were commercially proofed to be sold, and some were returned to the U.S. market.

It is not unusual to find Korean War era M1 Rifles with British commercial proofs. The rifles were purchased somewhere over the globe, shipped to England, and proofed to be put on the commercial market.

Being produced at the end of the war or even after the war ended probably reduces any military connection with the British commercial proofs.


ah, thank you for the explanation, that helps me understand it much better. so, the proof marks arent necessarily a positive thing as far as collect-ability goes, but they do give some idea of where the pistol may have been at various points in its past.
 

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hello, new member. saw this pistol in a shop and wanted to seek out the opinions of other colt enthusiasts on its condition. does it look original to you? whats up with the stamp on the barrel chamber, and the (what appears to be) british crown stamp in several locations seen in the pictures i took? thanks! -Nick

also-im not sure that the magazine is correct for this pistol, but im not familiar with specifics on a ww2 contract ace. it is a solid color, if im remembering correctly, it was a matte finish. i think it had service model ace stamped on the floor plate but thats going off memory and im not sure of it.
bookit89,

Welcome to the forum!

Is that price in picture three $3499.--? If the rest of the pistol looks similar to what you show in your pictures,---most likely, some of us would not have left the shop without it.!?

Best Regards,
 
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